IFAK's - Kit List and Information

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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
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IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/29/2015 by tucker301
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Due to recent events with an injury from a ND, there was a conversation of creating a thread with information on a good IFAK. The contents vary a bit based on training. The list I am including is for those with limited or no training. You must read about the equipment and have working knowledge of it prior to an emergency arising. Reading a simple guide to first aid is good, taking a class, be it TCCC or something less involved is better than just a book. These classes can be expensive. We justify a metric shit ton of expenditures for all sorts of things. Many of us own firearms specifically aimed at keeping us safe. This knowledge and kit can be and often is life saving if the moment arises, it is up to you to decide what you or your shooting buddies life could be worth, or even that of a complete stranger.

KIT LIST:

Tourniquet - CAT, SOF-T - the other brands I know of do not easily allow for it to be tightened well enough to be effective. Both of these are one handed operation - key element.

Quickclot Combat Guaze -There was a study of all available hemostatic dressings. They used pigs and did real time tests on clotting. This one came out way above in all categories. No messing around. You want the Z-folded guaze, not a sponge, not the powder. All other guazes are not the same.

Pressure dressing. I like 2 sizes, I use a 4" and a 6". I like the rolled variety. These are prepackaged a easy to use.

Halo Chest Seal - I do not know of another brand. They make vented and unvented. Proper use and knowledge of what to use come from the class.

Nasopharyngeal Airway 28F - this will fit most. This provides a way to keep an open airway in an unconscious patient with a gag relfex. You will learn about this in class. DO NOT FUCK around with this if you dont know. If there is further facial trauma with fractures going into the basilar skull, you could stick this into the brain. This will certainly kill them.

Trauma Shears - basic and cheap. Allow rapid access to wounds. Can cut tape, bandages, or whatever else. Nice Titanium ones can be found on Ebay or Amazon. They are nicer and stay sharper much longer.

If you shoot at a busy range, maybe throw some gloves in - keep yourself safe at all times!

Except for the shears, all items can be found at rescue-essentials.com There are other places, but they have a good selection, good prices, and flat rate shipping.

Unless you are actually an operator [(no, you are not)if you are, your employer usually furnishes this gear?], I recommend bright ass colors for your tourniquet, dressing packaging, and shears. Easier to find once you dump your IFAK, easy to see tourniquets are awesome on the receiving end, hard to miss.

There are many ways to store an IFAK. Most of the well known brands of gear aimed at the tactical crowd makes a kit especially for this. HSGI, blue force, 5.11, many others.

I use a cheap 5.11 6x6 MOLLE pouch or the next size up. Its all I need and my list is a bit bigger than what is listed above based on my knowledge.

Once you take a class, build a kit. Build a second one. Make your shooting buddies have one in their packs. If you feel the need for overkill, make a bigger one to keep in the truck.



I have no financial involvement with any of the companies listed. I have used a lot of this gear, in training or in life and appreciate it for its effectiveness and simplicity. If someone has information better than mine, please share. I do this for a living, I teach this for a living. That does not mean I know everything and I always love to learn.



I have the lists and links to view/purchase each of these, plus some of the fancier IFAK kits, but cannot cut and paste the google doc due to lockouts on my work laptop. If an admin (Tucker) would be willing to help with that, PM me and I can mail you the google docs.

Please be safe!


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IFAK Contents

US Army ISR Hemostatic Study

Practical Use of Tourniquet



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pmclaineXFirst Sergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015
(1 vote)
[HR][/HR]Awesome thank you.

The kits I posted elsewhere were a one step shopping excercise but I agree they contain gear beyond the basic goals of stop the bleeding, check for breathing, treat for shock, that almost anyone can employ with minimal training.

Thank you for taking time to post. Now I need to do some shopping. I think a modest expenditure of +/- $100 is not an exorbitant amount for responsibility and prep. Actually a lot cheaper than most of the stuff I buy in this sport.
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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015
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Pmclaine

If you look at the website, other than a bag to store it in on your person, the website listed is a one-stop shopping. Any smallish bag will work. A small fanny pack from Walmart will work. Just make it small and easy to find the gear is my best advice, the KISS principle applies for sure.

I might add, if you dont have to go all "tactical", make it a bright bag and mark it well.

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herofish

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015
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I have been having problems getting the quick clot combat gauze z-fold - where can I get this ideally in bulk?

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anb618XCorporal
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/28/2015 by anb618
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For anyone interested in buying a well thought out prepackaged kit, AR500 Armor sells their "Emergency Personal Injury Kits" or EPIKs that I think are very well thought out and priced very reasonably, especially the Pocket EPIKs and Pack EPIKs.

I purchased a Pocket EPIK ($29.99) and a Pack Light EPIK ($39.99) for range and work use.

The Pack Light EPIK contains;
(1) Celox 15g Hemostatic Granule Packet
(1) Swat-Tourniquet (Swat-T, Tourniquet, Pressure Dressing, or Elastic Bandage)
(1) H&H Thin-H Emergency Bandage (Compression Bandage, Hasty Tourniquet, or Emergency Sling)
(1) H&H PriMed Compressed Gauze Roll - 4.5" x 4.1 yards
(1) Waterproof Medical Tape - .5" x 2.5 yards (I replaced with 1" 3M Transpore waterproof tape)
(1) Pair Heavy Duty Black Nitrile Medical Gloves (Large)
(1) Re-sealable heavy duty aLOKSAK

The Pocket EPIK contains;
(1) Celox 15g Hemostatic Granule Packet
(1) Swat-Tourniquet (Swat-T, Tourniquet, Pressure Dressing, or Elastic Bandage)
(1) H&H PriMed Compressed Gauze - 4.5" x 4.1 yards
(1) 4" Compressed Bandage
(1) Pair Heavy Duty Black Nitrile Medical Gloves (Large)
(1) Re-sealable heavy duty aLOKSAK
(I added the 0.5" waterproof medical tape from the Pack Light EPIK in a void within the aLOKSAK without adding any bulk)

*This kit actually fits in my cargo shorts pocket when off-duty, and in my uniform pants cargo pocket without being unreasonably bulky. I realize I have no chest seal in either EPIK, but I have received basic SelfAid/BuddyAid training and know I can MacGyver a chest seal out of materials I already have on hand at the range and at work.

The two kits I bought are two of the more conservative kits since I have to weigh mobility and preparedness. Check them out if you're interested.
http://www.ar500armor.com/medical-kits-epiks.html

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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015
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@bisontactical - I dont know where to buy bulk, especially at a discounted rate. I would try contacting rescue essentials or even better, Quickclot.

The cheaper kits do add some benefits over nothing, but are not the best in my opinion. In the world of life and death, is it worth going cheap?

The Celox is an inferior product to the Quickclot combat gauze. I will get that study posted, then everyone can make their own decision regarding if the better product is worth the extra money.

The SWAT tourniquet will probably not work to control a mass hemorrhage. The nylon that tightens, then the stick that twists to tighten it is the key of a good tourniquet. That is why I only recommended the two I did, they are the best.

As for "making shit up on the fly" it is possible. Will it be as fast or as good? Be honest with yourself here. Its a $12-20 investment for the pre-made ones. So many of us on here function at a high speed when the shit hits the fan, we run at chaos, that we will be able to do what is needed in the moment. Making it as simple as opening a package stacks the odds in my favor. I work in a high level environment with all the staff, tools, and training to do this, we still use specific tools premade for the job.

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LRShooter101XGunny Sergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/31/2015 by LRShooter101
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Keep in mind, something is better than nothing, and with anything there are "Pros & Cons" and "Good, Better, Best".



In terms of Gear/Equipment

Tourniquet - SOF-T Wide

https://www.tacmedsolutions.com/product/sof-tactical-tourniquet-wide/

(Personally, I would NOT spend money on a CAT Combat Applications Tourniquet, high failure rate, Chinese fakes, etc)



Pressure Dressing

OLAES - https://www.tacmedsolutions.com/product/olaes-modular-bandage/

H Bandage - http://gohandh.com/multi-use-hemostat-and-compression-bandage



Occlusive Dressing

Commercial Chest Seals (Asherman, Beacon, Fox) - https://www.tacmedsolutions.com/category/airway-and-breathing/



Hemostats

Quickclot Combat Gauze - https://www.tacmedsolutions.com/product/quikclot-combat-gauze-military-only/

Celox, HemCon, etc - http://search.chinookmed.com/search...--searchtype-and--template-search--type-store

They all work well in the field, as long as they are NOT some form of Powder. Make sure they are impregnated in a Sponge or Gauze.



Notes on Gear Equipment:

- watch for Chinese Fakes especially on ebay

- many of these items like Hemostats have expiration dates. Arguments about how long past the date they are still good, when in doubt don't buy/use expired stuff!

- you can go to your local Dollar Store, buy gauze, ace bandages, and duct tape, and that will go a long way. You can improvise Tourniquets. You can use any plastic for an occlusive dressing. Keeping people alive, comes down to having some supplies, but knowledge and technique are ultimately the critical component.



Below is the way that we teach our people, it seems to work the best for most people without high levels of medical training.

There are 5 primary penetrating traumas that you are going to need to address based on location of the injury and treatment procedures:

Extremities / Arms & Legs - Gauze, Ace Bandage, Tape, Commercial Pressure Dressing, Tourniquet

Start with direct pressure on the wound site, elevation above the heart level, followed by pressure points, if that all fails go with a Tourniquet. You can also use a Hemostat (Quick Clot, Celox, etc) with a pressure dressing, but if the bleeding is severe enough you are generally better off to just go with a Tourniquet if the pressure dressing is not working.



Junctional Areas / Pelvis & Hips, Shoulders - Gauze, Ace Bandage, Tape, Commercial Pressure Dressing

Start with direct pressure on the wound site, if that all fails apply a Hemostat (Quick Clot, Celox, etc), pack the wound and apply pressure and/or pressure dressing.



Chest - Occlusive Air Tight Material, Commercial Chest Seal, Ace Bandage, Tape

Seal the injury site with an occlusive dressing (air tight material). If you completely seal the wound, monitor breathing, if it becomes labored (air escaping from lung is filling the plural space), open the seal and "burp it" allowing trapped air to clear the plural space, then reseal it. If you use a seal with a valve, or leave a partial opening in the seal, the wound should "burp" itself as needed.



Abdomen - Clean Sterile Dressings, Ace Bandage, Tape

Manage large amounts of bleeding with direct pressure and pressure dressings. Cover any protruding viscera or organs with sterile dressings. Do NOT attempt to place anything back into the abdominal cavity. Most life threatening bleeding will be internal, and little to nothing can be done for that in the field.



Head - Clean Sterile Dressings, Ace Bandage, Tape, Airway Adjuncts

Manage large amounts of bleeding with direct pressure and pressure dressings. Be very careful with pressure if the skull or other bones are compromised. Monitor for signs of airway compromise, maintain the person in a position that will allow fluids to drain out of air passage ways. Place/Insert Basic Airway Adjuncts (Nasopharyngeal Airway).



With all injuries above, remember "MARCH"

M - Massive Bleeds, Stop Arterial Bleeding

A - Airway, Maintain Airway based on Position, use of Adjuncts

R - Respiration, if not adequate, Rescue Breathing

C - Circulation, CPR if needed

H - Hypothermia, remove wet/bloody clothing, keep dry and warm

Look for and manage SHOCK as needed



Military / National EMT Training - Tactical Combat Causality Care Training Program

https://www.naemt.org/education/TCCC/guidelines_curriculum



Question on anything, feel free to fire away.

My background includes 30 years as a Military & Public Safety Medic.

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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/29/2015 by tucker301
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LRshooter

Thanks for the info on the CAT tourniquets. I researched them, but have only used the SOF T.

Thanks for adding the info, I chose not to include it, but appreciate you doing it.

Tucker is helping me post the research study on the Hemostatic agents, I have emailed him the google docs, hopefully he can post them today.



[HR][/HR]
IFAK Contents

US Army ISR Hemostatic Study

Practical Use of Tourniquet




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DocUSMCRetired

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/28/2015 by DocUSMCRetired
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Take a class, or talk to someone with experience before you use some of this. Some of it can easily cause a reaction, or kill if not used correctly. Some of the clotting agents can cause serious burns, blindness, or if you allergic to shell fish. Death. If you are going to use, make sure you know which version you have. If you have the old school quick-clot that gets hot, you need at least a roll of gauze to protect you from it. You also need a set of tweezers. My wife, just last Sunday at the range, had to open ours, and pull the tweezers to remove an ear plug that broke off in another shooters ear. Things happen you wouldn't think of. Don't bother with having all kinds of sizes. Just get Israeli dressings and be done. If you need the gauze, you can rip the wings off, now you have gauze. Not as a substitute for roll gauze, but just if need some. Some other things to throw in. Triangle Bandage, cpr shield, silver bullet. A little burn gel. Some matches, an angiocath (for decompression). Don't waste your money on an emergency airway kit. If you need to hold the tongue out of the way, use a large safety pin, and pin it to the lip. If you need to make an airway, get some IV tubing. Take the drip chamber, cut it in half. Now you have a rather large needle, which can both make a hole, and they can breath trough, but you also don't need any tools. These can be manually inserted to create an airway without all the hassle. It is great to have the tools, but just like any tool, using them wrong can cause a world of hurt. Any bag will do, if your keeping this in your shooting bag, a ziplock bag is fine. On that note. If you want a couple of extras, like aspirin, sting swabs, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, mole skin, small gauze, Band-Aids, anything not life/limb/eye sight and what not. Toss those in a med roll. Leave all non emergency crap in a second bag. You don't want to have dig through crap, to save a life. 1 bag for SHTF, 1 bag for boo boos. If its something small, it can still be serious and small, then it doesn't need to be treated with the IFAK.

Note: Alcohol is for cleaning your gear/instruments. Iodine is for cleaning wounds. Don't worry about sterility if they have been shot, or have some other gaping hole. plenty of crap is already made it in. That's what antibiotics are for.

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TerryCross

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/28/2015 by TerryCross
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DocUSMCRetired wrote:
Some of the clotting agents can cause serious burns, blindness, or if you allergic to shell fish.​
Doc, we were recently told by our instructors and medical directors that all of the old QuickClot powder type agents are off the market due to issues that you mentioned above. Supposedly the new combat gauze and similar mainstream trauma products have clotting agents and suitable carriers that avoid most of the bad stuff.

Does this coincide with what you have heard?

I am a complete caveman on this and am just trying to get as many qualified opinions as I can.

Thanks,

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TerryCross

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/28/2015 by TerryCross
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Elija,



What is your opinion of the Olaes?

I was only recently introduced to it and it looked impressive. Also has a good track record so far. Small and multi-purpose.

We used them in scenarios in my last cert. Even my dumb ass could make sense of it in a hurry.

I dumped a couple of things to make room and added one to each of my kits.

Thanks,

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TerryCross

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2015 Last edited 08/29/2015 by TerryCross
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Something to think about maybe....



We were lucky to have access to the CAT and SOF-T. Used both for several days. The SWAT-T was there also but it was cast as a secondary.

Most of us found that the CAT was very good but the Velcro would be aggravating to deal with especially in the dark and/or one handed. The SOF-Ts we used were the ones without the 2nd buckle and clamp. I think those were mandated by Mil or something. Anyway, most of us preferred the SOF-T. The buckle on it allows easier application especially if applying to a limb that is trapped, pinned or inaccessible via sliding over the end. The CAT can be separated but is in my opinion more difficult to deal with reconnecting / feeding back through the buckle under stress.

I guess my point is that if you are going to spend your own $ on several of these to outfit your kits, I would highly suggest getting with your local Fire or EMT, etc... to personally review both. Pick the one that YOU feel you can use the best and purchase only that brand and style. Don't put a different style T in each kit.

I just never realized that all Ts are not made equal and darned sure aren't handled the same.



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anb618XCorporal
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/29/2015
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powdahound80 wrote:

@bisontactical - I dont know where to buy bulk, especially at a discounted rate. I would try contacting rescue essentials or even better, Quickclot.

The cheaper kits do add some benefits over nothing, but are not the best in my opinion. In the world of life and death, is it worth going cheap?

The Celox is an inferior product to the Quickclot combat gauze. I will get that study posted, then everyone can make their own decision regarding if the better product is worth the extra money.

The SWAT tourniquet will probably not work to control a mass hemorrhage. The nylon that tightens, then the stick that twists to tighten it is the key of a good tourniquet. That is why I only recommended the two I did, they are the best.

As for "making shit up on the fly" it is possible. Will it be as fast or as good? Be honest with yourself here. Its a $12-20 investment for the pre-made ones. So many of us on here function at a high speed when the shit hits the fan, we run at chaos, that we will be able to do what is needed in the moment. Making it as simple as opening a package stacks the odds in my favor. I work in a high level environment with all the staff, tools, and training to do this, we still use specific tools premade for the job.​
Everyone has their own opinions. The Celox has been proven to stop bleeding, and takes up less room in my kit than the QuikClot sponge, so for my use I prefer it.

Claiming the SWAT-T will not control arterial bleeding is completely untrue. There have been multiple independent studies showing that the SWAT-T is even better suited to stop arterial bleeding than the CAT tourniquet. Link provided to the "Military Medicine" article abstract below. The article shows that the SWAT-T is initially more effective than the CAT. They also claim that over time as muscle tissue relaxes, the CAT will become less effective and allow blood flow. The SWAT-T showed no signs of this issue.

http://publications.amsus.org/doi/abs/10.7205/MILMED-D-12-00490

The SWAT-T is recommended by plenty of reputable trainers and has plenty of successful applications in the real world to back that. It was recommended to me (and the rest of the group being trained) by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman. As long as it works (proven above that it does) the items size and weight are the following deciding factor in my equipment selection.

I'm aware that under intense pressure you will fall to your lowest level of training, and am not claiming I'm OAF or that I believe I'll always rise to the occasion. I'm merely saying that if that time comes and I can remember to use the factory packaged chest seal tucked in my kit, I could just as easily tear apart the aLOKSAK and tape it up over the wound on 3 sides. The only difference is one less thing in my kit taking up space and weight this way.

Just my $0.02. Please don't spread untrue information. The Internet has enough of it. ?

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tucker301

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/29/2015
(1 vote)
[HR][/HR]Links are now added. I'll make this one a sticky as well.
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Redmanss

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/29/2015
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***Disclaimer - I'm a past grunt and security contractor, not a professional medic. A few trips to CLS training is my professional medical education.***

That said, I've been on the operator end of applying tourniquets and have done so post attack before. The SOF-T is by far my preferred tourniquet due to ease of application under stress, long length for even the meatiest of wounded personnel, the aluminum windlass will never break or bend when cold or hot, and when you screw down the clamp it's going nowhere for sure. My company issued the cheaper CAT tourniquets, and they required more training and practice to get my TCN and LN guards consistent proper application of them, especially on self application. I bought my own SOF-Ts for both work and home because I've always felt they're a superior tourniquet, but either will definitely do the deed if properly placed.

I look at the SWAT tourniquet and it looks good, but it requires more than one wrap around the limb to properly apply and cannot be done one handed for self application. When I think to some of the trauma I've dealt with, that would require more patient movement than I would have wanted to do in comparison to one time feeding around the leg/arm with a SOF-T. Blast injuries are never single point trauma and I never wanted to aggravate spinal or neck injuries further due to me being rough on the patient as I'm cranked to full volume, so I would try to move the wounded as little as necessary while applying bandages and tourniquets. This may not apply to what civvies will see in the field or on the range, but I feel it still needs to be said.

After you apply a T, bandage, chest seal, etc., continuously assess the wounded and the treatments you applied as they will shift and/or loosen while being evacuated. This is especially important if you apply it over clothing or heavy bleeding, you really have to watch them like a hawk. Shock is a given.

Absolutely though, something is better than nothing and it's a heck of a lot faster to apply a real tourniquet than improvise one. Keep it as handy as you can and easily identified, not buried in your kit, and teach your mate/kids/shooting/hunting buddies how to apply one if they don't have the background already. If you having nothing else, at least have a tourniquet or four. I've seen more than I care to think about both live and die because of how fast they got a tourniquet on them.

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LRShooter101XGunny Sergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/29/2015 Last edited 08/29/2015 by LRShooter101
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If you want to keep up with the latest and greatest the Committee on Tactical Combat Causality Care are the ones to follow:

NREMT

https://www.naemt.org/education/TCCC/guidelines_curriculum

(scroll down to the bottom for the latest docs/links)



SOMA/JSOM

https://www.jsomonline.org/TCCC.html



On Hemostats, you basically have 3 types of agents:

- Kaolin based like Combat Gauze, activates intrinsic pathway of coagulation

- Smectite based like Wound Stat, absorbs fluid to form a clay like patching material

- Chitosan based like Celox & Chito Flex, cross-links red blood cells to form mucoadhesive bandage

Pros & Cons to all of them, if you want to really dig into the details of how they work.

Contrary to popular belief, Chitosan based Hemostats which come from shellfish, have not actually been shown to cause anaphylaxis/allergic reaction in people with a shellfish allergy. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22128651

When you are looking at Hemostats make sure that your info/sources are up to date, things have changed a lot since their introduction in Tactical Trauma Care over the last 10 years.



One of the best new things that we have found for really nasty bleeders in Junctional Areas is XStat & XGauze:

http://www.revmedx.com/#!xstat-dressing/c2500

http://www.revmedx.com/#!xgauze/chh1



NOTE! Some of these Hemostatic Agents are covered under Medical Practice/Liscensure, so a civilian will not be able to purchase them.



For the non-life threatening bleeding:

Dermabond (you can use Super Glue, NOT recommended!)

http://www.ethicon.com/healthcare-p...dhesives/dermabond-mini-topical-skin-adhesive

Bloodstop Gauze

http://www.lifescienceplus.com/bloodstop/general-gauze



Additional Links:

http://combatmedicalsystems.com

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KTDLS7

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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/29/2015
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Tucker, this thread is worthy of "sticky" - Thanks!

I attended a course titled "Range Response" presented by Lone Star Medics, in the DFW area. The target audience was RMs, ROs, and RSOs. Caleb Causey, instructor, is a professional, and did an outstanding job. We covered, and used many of the products and devices discussed. The comments below are a based on actually using the products, and I have no monetary gain from said products.

Reiterating comments in previous posts, it was stressed in class: Do NOT obtain products from E-Bay, due to counterfeit. Your life is not worth a few $.



IMHO:

Bandages - The Olaes is superior to other products. It incorporates an integral pocket that contains an additional gauze pack that can be left in place for serious bleeding, or removed and used for another wound. The unique feature is 1/4" strips of Velcro placed approximately every 6" across the elastic bandage. How many here have used an Ace bandage, only to have it slip from your hands and unroll across the floor? The Velcro keeps it from unrolling, helps retain wrap retention, and certainly facilitates "single-handing" a bandage. We used the others, but the Olaes was the one I preferred.

Tourniquet - Mentioned were the CAT, SOFT-T, and SWAT-T. We used all three (or attempted), with the exception of the SOF-T. We used the SOFT-T Wide, which has a slightly wider strap. We were required to deploy tourniquets on others first, and then ourselves.

o SWAT-T Agree to the comment above, the SWAT-T is NOT a preferred product. There is no adjustment, except wrapping tighter. "Single handing" is next to impossible for rapid deployment. Imagine a strip of thin inner tube and attempting to wrap with two, much less one hand. It does pack small, and something is better than nothing.

o CAT A good product, but the strap buckle is not easy to remove the slack, especially "single handing". The tension rod utilizes a clip, then Velcro to retain within the clip. As mentioned earlier, the Velcro retainer is doomed to failure if contaminated with blood and dirt, and you don't want this sucker coming loose.

o SOFT-T Wide Great product! The strap buckle for slack removal is easy with two hands, very doable with one. The tension rod retainer uses a positive plastic loop that will not allow the rod to slip. No Velcro is used on the this system.



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StrykervetXFirst Sergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/30/2015
[HR][/HR]
Don't forget a sharpie --I like the big ones for this and black, not red-- to mark up the body if need be. Like a big ass T on the forehead for "tourniquet" (med staff need to know about that NOW and they always look at the face first). You can also mark the blood type, allergies or other info in you have access to it. They teach this in CLS classes, where of course they issue all the above items (except the marker).

The gloves are a must have. So is betadine (I like the small, 4-6oz. one time use bottle), you can't use alcohol or peroxide in deep wounds.

They do issue an IV bag but you need to know how to administer a catheter and have the proper gear. For those of you that DO know how to administer one, they can be bought online at http://www.allegromedical.com/?&gcl...odztkFOQ&kwid=297347430x13819078349x197182469 and the IV bags can be had at http://www.mountainside-medical.com/. Lactated ringers is common but so is saline; you use different ones for different problems so make sure to pack the correct one. I carried 1L ea. of lactated ringers and saline. If you haven't stuck someone in a while, it'd be good practice to do so. Use a smaller catheter; they aren't exactly the best in a trauma situation but they are easier to administer when amped up and when the guy you are resuscitating has lost so much fluids that he's hard to stick.

A folding splint is another good item if you don't have that on the list. A lot of us don't go shooting at ranges, we go deep into the wilderness where more medical attention may be needed on the way to the hospital. We also carried a ded sled on our ruck with stuff packed in it. So what you carry is kind of dictated by how far away from the hospital/professional care you are time-wise. And of course your skills.

Note that any assistance outside of basic first aid could put you at risk for medical malpractice lawsuits if you further injure the individual or he's a just a dick. I wouldn't stick anyone I didn't know that didn't give me prior okay to do so. Just a heads up.

Community college my have a single course with much of the above covered. If you have zero medical knowledge, it would behoove you to do so as you can injure someone more by doing the wrong thing. If you are in the military, go to your sick call location and ask them about their next CLS class and sign up for it. It's about a week long and well worth it.

Oh, and many of the listed items can be found at surplus stores in sealed IFAK military kits for a steal. Some actually still have the meds in them! Some stuff needs to be thrown away and some replaced, use discretion.

Good luck guys, hope you never need any of this and it just expires and gets replaced like mine does.

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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
Rating: 3.3/5 this site
598 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/30/2015
[HR][/HR]
Awesome additions, thanks guys.

I will state That the gear I listed was selected for ease of use and based on research I had available that was conclusive in my eyes. I did not take the time to do a lit review of all studies. I did not mean to upset anyone by pushing for the "best", in my world, that is what I will accept.
My push towards prepackaged gear is that it is easier and faster when the SHTF.
My hope is we all have a badass IFAK and training and that shit never gets used except to practice to be comfortable using it. This stuff is just like shooting. Dryfiring will make it easier to do the real thing.
Take care

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SmokerrollerXSergeant
Rating: 3.1/5 this site
496 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/30/2015
[HR][/HR]Tagged. Thanks for the knowledge guys.
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txfireguy2003XSergeant
Rating: 3.1/5 this site
125 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/31/2015
[HR][/HR]
This is an excellent thread. As a professional medic, I've been upgrading my aid kit lately after I took a long fall at the hunting lease and realized what I had wasn't enough if someone gets really hurt out there. I'm looking at probably a half hour from the time we call until help arrives from town, then probably 45 minutes or better from the ranch to the nearest hospital unless we bring in a helicopter. That's from the time of the call, finding cell service will be another delay.

I too prefer the SOF-T over the others, but I'm issued the CAT because it's cheaper (govt low bid and all). I have access to catheters, IV supplies, combat gauze, chest seals etc, but that's theft. Getting some of that stuff simply by ordering it online is sometimes problematic, as many vendors only sell to agencies with valid credentials, not individual medics. Very few vendors will sell IV fluids and catheters.

The next hangup comes with, as mentioned, legal matters. I can get in big trouble for practicing when of duty, as my medical director only covers me on duty. On the other hand, better to take an ass chewing than to die or let someone die when you had another option.

Anyway, excellent thread.

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DocUSMCRetired

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.5/5 this site
1969 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/31/2015 Last edited 08/31/2015 by DocUSMCRetired
[HR][/HR]Their is a lot of good information here!

Yes the newer stuff is far safer than the older stuff. However be careful where you buy. Like anything (CAT had issues with Chinese knock offs) some places are just a bad source. Buy from reputable well known dealers. But also keep in mind things are changing at an extremely rapid pace. From the time we started teaching CLS (I was in one of the first classes out of Pendleton), to OEMS and other things that have really advanced. A lot of the old methods and ideas we had, have gone on to see serious improvements. So it is a good idea to stay on top of the latest information. But it is also a good idea to know what has been in the past, incase you run in to old gear. Some units, and agencies buy once, and let it rot. Same goes for some dealers. Know what you have, and how to use it.

It is always good to sit down with someone in the know. TCCC, OEMS, CLS, are good starting points to learn. But legally you can get in hot water performing some procedures without a license. This is where you have to choose, do I risk it.

I too like the Sof-T better. But CATs are not too much harder to use, and we used them plenty in Iraq. Something is better than nothing in the end. I have both on hand, simply because I was given both. So knowing how to use both is important.

Some things you don't have to spend a fortune on, and can improvise. Keeping your kit simple can help, if you are not training or practicing on a regular basis. We forget things rather quickly. On the other hand doing it can sometimes implant it in your muscle memory for a long time. So for some of you, a ride along can go a long ways. See if a local paramedic will let you tag along, and stay out of the way. Choose a day like 4th of July, New Years, Christmas, or Thanksgiving. That way you know someone will do something stupid.

Their is some great advice already listed here. Take a look at the old, and stay up to date on the new. Things like VetiGel are going to be game changers

Aside from that, you need to go with what works for you, and keep in mind the legal restrictions you may have to deal with. Doing something wrong could end up causing more damage, than leaving it alone would have. So train, practice, ask questions, and always seek help/advice if it looks beyond your reach.
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TerryCross

XSergeant
Rating: 3.7/5 this site
240 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/31/2015 Last edited 08/31/2015 by TerryCross
[HR][/HR]
txfireguy2003 wrote
The next hangup comes with, as mentioned, legal matters. . . . . . . . . On the other hand, better to take an ass chewing than to die or let someone die when you had another option.​
Same concerns were voiced in my groups and we were told "un-officially" to not let that stop you if there is a hole and puddle of rapidly increasing size.

The whole "scope of practice" thing (enforcement) varied greatly by jurisdiction and circumstances.

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ultrarunner7XGunny Sergeant
Rating: 3.3/5 this site
652 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/01/2015 Last edited 09/01/2015 by ultrarunner7
(1 vote)
[HR][/HR]
I'm an 18D and I approve is thread! Good shit gents. I see so many dudes at the range with all the wrong shit. They often have "cereal but no milk".
The SOF-T or SOF-T wide are awesome. I've used them both a lot. You have to watch the SOF-T though as the triangle clip will get caught on the screw which won't enable the alligator buckle to function properly. Food for thought. Also, have a plan for junctional bleeders(inguinal area and axe pocket(groin and armpit)). If you don't have a CROC or another junctional HEMCON device, you can take pole or long rigid stick, tuck one end under the belt. Tie the other end at the foot. Place a Nalgene bottle or large object on the junctional bleeder, then buddy splint the legs(tie them together)). Final step is be careful while transporting them as it can remove pressure.
Also, I taped up an intake manifold with a HALO chest seal on a Hilux in the middle of shitville. I drove it for a week until I RTBed and handed it over to a pro. Great dressing that sticks to anything. Ive thrown on a few guys over the years and I'll never forget what a trauma doc said to me once during a handoff. "Wtf is this?! I can't get it off!". My job is done here sir...
Also, they fold up nice and compact and there are two per pack...slightly imperative.

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strikeeagle1XSergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
385 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/01/2015
[HR][/HR]
Most states, if not all, have Good Samaritan laws to protect civilians against liability when your actions are in good-faith to medically assist others.

Googling your individual state Statutes regarding Good Samaritan laws may address concerns regarding how rendering first-aid to strangers may affect you. The Hippocratic dictum "primum non nocere" = "first do no harm" is a useful guiding principle for deciding when / how / how much to intervene. As a surgeon in Florida I do not recall ever hearing about a single incident wherein a civil negligence suit was filed against a first responder, trained or otherwise. If you are doing the best you can for the problem at hand it is also wise to step aside when the licensed professionals arrive-on-scene.

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txfireguy2003XSergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/01/2015
[HR][/HR]
Yeah, the good Samaritan laws can come into play, and I doubt you'd have much criminal trouble. Civil trouble wouldn't likely be too great either, except from the aspect of "practicing medicine without a license" if you were to do things beyond what a normal civilian would do. Because, in Texas anyway, I'm only authorized to perform medical procedures (iv administration for example) under the license of my medical director, if said MD does not agree to cover me when I'm off duty (she officially doesn't) then I'm practicing without a license. That's my understanding anyway. The other problem that may come into play, is with the department of state health services, who may decide to revoke or suspend my certification for practicing without the approval of a medical director.

All that being said, morally, ethically, if I'm equipped to respond, I feel as though I have a duty to act and will do so. Therein lies my problem though, "equipped", as so much of this stuff is restricted. Sure I can "acquire" everything I need and then some, but doing so would be theft from my employer, and I'm not willing to risk my freedom, my peace officer license, any of my other certs etc, over a 14ga angiocath, IV fluids etc.

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DocUSMCRetired

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.5/5 this site
1969 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/02/2015
[HR][/HR]Don't forget that you can file this stuff on your taxes. I built a med bag for the range, and wrote the total cost off as a work expense. This is "non-reimbursed equipment". They wouldn't have much of a leg to stand on, if they tried to say it was not. Almost every work place I have ever seen had a first aid kit/defib. Why would your vehicle (which is essentially your office at the range) not.
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pmclaineXFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.5/5 this site
4218 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/03/2015 Last edited 09/03/2015 by pmclaine
[HR][/HR]
The news this AM (Boston market) had a piece on the danger of counterfeit tourniquets.

They showed a medic trying to tension a counterfeit and the tension bar snapped. Thing looked rubbery before he even started to really put tourque on it. They are that bad?

It should be criminal to sell such crap knowing that it's use is going to a life or death situation. Shame on our govt for not going after such hacks.

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Wyfox

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
1306 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/04/2015 Last edited 09/04/2015 by Wyfox
[HR][/HR]
I highly reccomend the RevMed X inc. TX2 tourniquet. Uses a ratchet buckle like a ski boot and has a bite loop for self application. It's reusable unlike a CAT.

Plus look at their X-Gauze a 36" z folded dressing with embedded expanding sponges, stops bleeding fast when packed into a wound.

Another cool product they have is called a Parabelt. Mil spec belt with a built in tourniquet. Great for hunting.

revmedx.com

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strikeeagle1XSergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
385 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/05/2015
[HR][/HR]
Wyfox wrote:
I highly reccomend the RevMed X inc. TX2 tourniquet. ........... It's reusable unlike a CAT...........

revmedx.com
A CAT is certainly reusable, but unless one was in a dire situation wherein you would remove it from a deceased patient to apply it contemporaneously on yet another injured-in-need.......why would anyone desire to have a most likely blood soaked tourniquet of any brand, then cleansed / sterilized ? for replacement / re-use in your kit?

Medically, all tourniquets are quite inexpensive and should be considered a one-time use device just from the important standpoint of potential exposure to biohazardous bloodborne pathogens (HIV / hepatitis etc) between the secondary future usages.
 
G

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Wyfox

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
1306 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/05/2015
[HR][/HR]
strikeeagle1 wrote:
Wyfox wrote:
I highly reccomend the RevMed X inc. TX2 tourniquet. ........... It's reusable unlike a CAT...........

revmedx.com
A CAT is certainly reusable, but unless one was in a dire situation wherein you would remove it from a deceased patient to apply it contemporaneously on yet another injured-in-need.......why would anyone desire to have a most likely blood soaked tourniquet of any brand, then cleansed / sterilized ? for replacement / re-use in your kit?

Medically, all tourniquets are quite inexpensive and should be considered a one-time use device just from the important standpoint of potential exposure to biohazardous bloodborne pathogens (HIV / hepatitis etc) between the secondary future usages.​
I like to use them for training purposes too, if I reuse a CAT multiple times during training the nylon webbing gets stretched and worn. The ski buckle is simple, cinch the tourniquet ratchet the buckle a few times and then hit the release to take off. When actually used in the field and you apply it and after a bit needed to tighten the tourniquet you just give it one more click. They are priced around $35 so it's worth the extra $5 for that convenience to me.

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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
Rating: 3.3/5 this site
598 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/05/2015
[HR][/HR]
Wyofox
Have you tested how well it restricts flow? I know the company does testing, but working in the medical world makes me skeptical of corporations claims. I am a bit hesitant to jump on a tourniquet that doesnt use a windlass but would love to see one of these tested in real time. May have to just get one and play around with a doppler US and the US with color flow on the vascular head.
Keep up the great additions and comments folks, the best plans dont come from everyone agreeing, but different ways of approaching the common goal.
Be safe!

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Wyfox

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
1306 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/05/2015
[HR][/HR]
I haven't tested it like that but I can say it was developed by a Delta Combat Medic with alot of field experience.

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strikeeagle1XSergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
385 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/06/2015 Last edited 09/06/2015 by strikeeagle1
[HR][/HR]
Certainly agree that repetitive use in the setting of tourniquet training is expected.......in fact, a goal might be to train often enough to wear the tourniquet out.

An additional point to remember is that if a properly applied tourniquet is not adequate to completely arrest bleeding, application of a second tourniquet applied immediately above the primary one is usually recommended; the difficulties encountered in a high thigh / high arm wound is there may not be enough anatomic real estate on the extremity immediately below the groin / armpit for properly applying that second tourniquet; firm direct pressure over the bleeding site and extremity elevation above the heart may be suggested to assist in hemorrhage control. For those that have never attempted to apply pressure directly to arterial bleeding you have to press much much harder than you might imagine. Additional situations to consider in advance are those involving self-rescue, how easy is it to apply ? your brand of tourniquet one-handed to the opposite injured upper extremity (some are impossible, some are easy), should you carry two tourniquets when venturing out alone (hunting ?), select a storage / carry placement of the tourniquet that you can readily access it with either uninjured hand. A tourniquet that has been properly applied to stop arterial bleeding will hurt a lot....shortly after successful application, expect the victim to complain of severe extremity pain that is different and lower in the extremity than the injury site; the denial of blood nourishment to the tissues beyond the tourniquet causes the sensory nerves to complain very loudly. Finally, if it has not yet been mentioned, once the tourniquet has been applied leave it in place (noting the time of placement if possible) until you arrive at a qualified treatment center.....no peek-a-boo's to see if its still bleeding !

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DocUSMCRetired

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.5/5 this site
1969 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/08/2015
[HR][/HR]
strikeeagle1 wrote:
Certainly agree that repetitive use in the setting of tourniquet training is expected.......in fact, a goal might be to train often enough to wear the tourniquet out.

An additional point to remember is that if a properly applied tourniquet is not adequate to completely arrest bleeding, application of a second tourniquet applied immediately above the primary one is usually recommended; the difficulties encountered in a high thigh / high arm wound is there may not be enough anatomic real estate on the extremity immediately below the groin / armpit for properly applying that second tourniquet; firm direct pressure over the bleeding site and extremity elevation above the heart may be suggested to assist in hemorrhage control. For those that have never attempted to apply pressure directly to arterial bleeding you have to press much much harder than you might imagine. Additional situations to consider in advance are those involving self-rescue, how easy is it to apply ? your brand of tourniquet one-handed to the opposite injured upper extremity (some are impossible, some are easy), should you carry two tourniquets when venturing out alone (hunting ?), select a storage / carry placement of the tourniquet that you can readily access it with either uninjured hand. A tourniquet that has been properly applied to stop arterial bleeding will hurt a lot....shortly after successful application, expect the victim to complain of severe extremity pain that is different and lower in the extremity than the injury site; the denial of blood nourishment to the tissues beyond the tourniquet causes the sensory nerves to complain very loudly. Finally, if it has not yet been mentioned, once the tourniquet has been applied leave it in place (noting the time of placement if possible) until you arrive at a qualified treatment center.....no peek-a-boo's to see if its still bleeding !​
I know this is a terrible suggestion, but I have transitioned a casualty from a tourniquet to a pressure dressing. However this should only be done by highly qualified users, and I did this in a combat situation where he was going to pass 6 hours before he got the STP. While it can be done, I suggest only those with practice attempt it.
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strikeeagle1XSergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
385 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/08/2015 Last edited 09/08/2015 by strikeeagle1
[HR][/HR]
DocUSMCRetired wrote:
I know this is a terrible suggestion, but I have transitioned a casualty from a tourniquet to a pressure dressing. However this should only be done by highly qualified users, and I did this in a combat situation where he was going to pass 6 hours before he got the STP. While it can be done, I suggest only those with practice attempt it.​
The above is a good example of an advanced medical decision regarding tourniquets.​
For the readers at large, when circumstances are such ( outback hiking, medi-vac extraction not possible due to weather or military conditions on the ground etc.) that a tourniquet has been in place for 6-8 hours, the tissues beyond the tourniquet site have been seriously physiologically stressed. Such prolonged tourniquet application will cause the onset of early limb tissue death that may well result in gangrene and eventual limb loss. Why not just release the tourniquet and save your buddies aching limb ? The release of the tourniquet will typically have two consequences; resumption of bleeding, but almost more importantly toxins have been accumulating in the tissues below the tourniquet due to lack of circulation to the limb. Upon release of the tourniquet, those toxins will be rapidly returned to the general circulation of the victim and will rapidly cause the demise of the patient's organ systems furthering shock progressing to death. So, the advanced medical judgments regarding delayed prolonged tourniquet management can truly be those weighing life v. limb risks. Save the life to fight another day.​


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Str8shooterTxXSergeant
Rating: 2.9/5 this site
149 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/22/2015
[HR][/HR]
Excellent thread. 66H Capt USAR. Everyone should have a bare minimum IFAK. I tend to role with A and B bags depending on where and what I'm doing plus JEEP kit that covers staples, suture, lido, airway and cric kit. Hope I never have to use it in the civilian world. Well the staples got used a few times on drunk buddies. dumb asses.

Med kits are like condoms. Rather have it and not need it then need it and not have it! There ends the safety brief!



That is all...

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JuanMeanBurrito

XGunny Sergeant
Rating: 1.7/5 this site
660 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
11/02/2015
[HR][/HR]
I can't speak highly enough of Dark Angel Medical. Their kits are well designed and GTG, but more importantly their two day course is the best time and money you can ever spend.

darkangelmedical.com

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DocUSMCRetired

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.5/5 this site
1969 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
11/04/2015 Last edited 11/04/2015 by DocUSMCRetired
[HR][/HR]
JuanMeanBurrito wrote:
I can't speak highly enough of Dark Angel Medical. Their kits are well designed and GTG, but more importantly their two day course is the best time and money you can ever spend.

darkangelmedical.com
Even better than the pig lab and/or OEMS?

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JuanMeanBurrito

XGunny Sergeant
Rating: 1.7/5 this site
660 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
11/04/2015
(1 vote)
[HR][/HR]
DocUSMCRetired wrote:
JuanMeanBurrito wrote:
I can't speak highly enough of Dark Angel Medical. Their kits are well designed and GTG, but more importantly their two day course is the best time and money you can ever spend.

darkangelmedical.com
Even better than the pig lab and/or OEMS?​
The first rule of pig lab is that there is no pig lab.

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317millhand

X68 MONTHS
Premium Member
First Sergeant
Rating: 3.4/5 this site
2525 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
11/11/2015
[HR][/HR]
Does this one cover all the bases?
https://www.chasetactical.com/shop/enhanced-ifak-individual-first-aid-kit/

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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
Rating: 3.3/5 this site
598 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
11/13/2015 Last edited 11/13/2015 by powdahound80
[HR][/HR]
317,
It has a lot of what you need and even more of what you dont. The IFAK, imao, needs to be small and simple for saving a life, primarily your own. All the equipment for lesser injuries "Junks" up the kit when looking for the important gear during what will be a high stress emergency.
The extra items are good to have available and not part of what I would consider an IFAK. I keep them in a second and more complete kit in my vehicle.

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DocUSMCRetired

XFirst Sergeant
Rating: 3.5/5 this site
1969 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
11/19/2015
[HR][/HR]
JuanMeanBurrito wrote:
DocUSMCRetired wrote:
Even better than the pig lab and/or OEMS?​
The first rule of pig lab is that there is no pig lab.​
Even a decade ago the "live tissue lab" didn't "exist"....
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JerrrrstanleyXSergeant
Rating: 3.2/5 this site
322 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
11/22/2015
[HR][/HR]
I just made a large order of medical gear for our team. Oales, Halo's, Cat-T's, and rip away pouches. We already have Quickclot Combat Gauze, nasal pharyngeal's, and IV kits for everyone. Everything fits in a Condor Rip Away pouch that goes on our vests.

The one thing I might add with the Oales is when you are wrapping you can twist the bandage after a wrap or two and amplify the pressure directly over the wound. You have to twist it again on the next wrap so the velcro will be on the correct side. just make sure when you twist the bandage the twisted part goes directly over the little plastic cup so it directs all the pressure on the wound. As we were training the other day we wrapped it both ways and the twist added more than double the pressure.

We always have Medflight loaded with Coord's and ready to roll for our calls. If we expect lots of trouble we just have them stage close by. We have a medic (not me) on our team as well. He is aggravating as crap but he knows his stuff!!!



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DaveThomas83XSergeant
Rating: 3.0/5 this site
278 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
12/02/2015
[HR][/HR]
JuanMeanBurrito wrote:
I can't speak highly enough of Dark Angel Medical. Their kits are well designed and GTG, but more importantly their two day course is the best time and money you can ever spend.

darkangelmedical.com
Seconded. I spent 5 years as an EMT in a rural farming community. I have seen some...interesting...traumas. Kerry's class (well, Ross's, since he and Brandon taught this round) is a vital point of education. Even after improvising and adapting in the boonies, that class was a fantastic refresher/introduction. The kit now goes everywhere with me. When it's range time, not only do I have the D.A.R.K., but my squad level kit is firmly attached to my range bag.

The Dark Angel crew is solid, and the class is excellent enough that I already have next years' on the books.
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SARDogXPrivate
Rating: 3.0/5 this site
31 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
12/08/2015
[HR][/HR]
Has anyone heard any updates on the pre-hospital use of VETI-GEL? I see it is being used for studies during knee replacement surgery and some C-Sections. My guess is that DARPA is working with it in active combat zones but I haven't seen anything more for a pre-hospital application.

Just curious. Seems too good to be true but it would be a game changer for sure pre-hospital care of bleeding trauma.

For those that haven't seen it yet the inventor has good TED Talk. TED Talk on Veti-Gel



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powdahound80XGunny Sergeant
Rating: 3.3/5 this site
598 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
12/12/2015
[HR][/HR]
SARdog, I havent and I will look into it. Love learning about new stuff

FYI, police officer shot in Denver this week. Paramedics used two tourniquets to control bad hemorrhaging and he made it. According to the Denver Health chief of trauma surgery, Dr Moore, it was the deciding factor that saved his life.
I dont work there and have met Dr Moore a couple times ar conferences. Reminds me of Sam Elliot a bit, looks and demeanor.

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texasvetzerozeroX83 MONTHS
Premium Member
Sergeant
Rating: 3.1/5 this site
365 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
12/15/2015
[HR][/HR]
Did the Dark Angel class here a few months back with Kerry... Good class and Good Instructor. Would recommend it to others certainly.



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quietmike

X87 MONTHS
Premium Member
Sergeant
Rating: 3.2/5 this site
145 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
01/01/2016
[HR][/HR]I'll add a super cheap trauma kit. It's not as compact or advanced as some of the premade kits, but it's perfectly serviceable and cheap enough there's no excuse not to have at least this.

1:gallon ziplock bag- container for kit, becomes chest seal with tape.
2:1" medical tape-multiple uses
3: 2 rolls kerlix- can be bandage or dressing
4: latex or nitrile gloves
5: standard sharpie- writing medical info on patient, windlass for tourniquet.
6: 4" ace bandage- sprains, attaching splints, tourniquet with the sharpie.
7: emt shears

This was the redneck trauma kit we carried in our patrol cars for several years. They cost around $20.
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jeo556XSergeant
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Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
07/19/2016
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Just started to carry a minimal kit with me especially while shooting in the unfortunate event that something goes awry.

Based on the simplicity of use, and ability to use on myself/one-handed I decided to go with the RAT tourniquet. Reading through this thread I don't see anyone suggest it so I'm wondering why? I've tried it multiple times and could not locate a pulse while it was on, which is very trivial but seemed to suggest that it worked to my untrained mind. I'd love to hear if you guys think I need to trade it out for one of the above suggested tourniquets.

Thanks guys

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03DevLXPrivate
Rating: 3.1/5 this site
35 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/24/2016
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jeo556 wrote:
Just started to carry a minimal kit with me especially while shooting in the unfortunate event that something goes awry.

Based on the simplicity of use, and ability to use on myself/one-handed I decided to go with the RAT tourniquet. Reading through this thread I don't see anyone suggest it so I'm wondering why? I've tried it multiple times and could not locate a pulse while it was on, which is very trivial but seemed to suggest that it worked to my untrained mind. I'd love to hear if you guys think I need to trade it out for one of the above suggested tourniquets.

Thanks guys​
Because you will kill tissue by laying the wraps on top of one another in an emergency, plus its harder to use on legs than a SOFT-W and heavier than a CAT.

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jeo556XSergeant
Rating: 3.1/5 this site
464 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
08/28/2016
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Is tissue damage a significant concern when dealing with a situation catastrophic enough to require a tourniquet? I guess my follow up question would be if there is any evidence that shows the RATS doesn't stop bleeding? Thanks for the response, I appreciate the information.

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FilthyRamholeXPrivate
Rating: 3.0/5 this site
10 posts this site
Re: IFAKs- kit list and information
09/09/2016
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Mate i work for a very large euro ambulance service and our dressings and burns packs go missing all the time so the truck prep just make them out of belongings bags with stuff chucked in.

On a serious note if you're playing shooty bang bangs and are worried about a GSW:
Art tourniquet x1
OLAES dressing x2
Blast Dressing x1
Nightingale dressing x1
Chest seal x1
Mobile Phone
 
Feb 23, 2017
34
0
6
43
Salina, KS
#4
Excellent topic. I am a general surgeon and also serve as the Medical Director at a Level III trauma center.

I keep an IFAK in my range bag, have one on my battle belt, and keep a couple in my vehicle. We also keep tourniquets in our trauma bay at the hospital.

The American College of Surgeons launched a new national campaign this past fall titled Stop the Bleeding. The campaign is centered around teaching the public to stop traumatic bleeding with the use of direct pressure and tourniquets. The campaign stems directly from the Boston Marathon bombing where several of the fatalities may have been prevented with a rapidly applied tourniquet. Eventually, you may see a "Bleeding Kit" with gauze and a tourniquet on the wall right next to the AED that you frequently see out in public.

I think this is an excellent idea, and am excited to become an instructor and take this training to schools, 4-H clubs, Lions Clubs, church groups, etc.
 

usafa77

Full Member
Feb 18, 2017
346
12
18
#6
Just took the Dark Anget Medical class this weekend. Can't say enough good things about it. Kerry made things so simple and straightforward. Opened my eyes.
 
Sep 7, 2011
942
277
63
37
Golden CO
#7
PowerCatMD

So funny to read your post as I am heading to a couple high schools tomorrow with our TMD to teach this. Just creating some links and making sure I am familiar with the website for the presentation. I hope to teach it at my church and hopefully the youth groups there. I just opened the thread to post an update with the website.

For those who have read most or all of this thread, I am still a big advocate for the SofT and CAT touniquets. If you think you will apply it to yourself, the CAT is the meow for possible 1 handed operation. If you will be a 2 handed rescuer, its up to you. Learn as much as you can before hand.
I have personally seen people live who would have bled out if not for the tourniquet. I am sure many of our members here have as well.

Website is www.bleedingcontrol.org
 

NukeMMC

Damn Bubblehead
Mar 3, 2009
950
16
18
Harrisburg, PA
#8
Picked up a great AFAK from TacMed Solutions. Contains a 4" Olaes compression bandage, QuickClot gauze, NP airway & lube, shears, 14g needle, gloves, a Fox chest seal and their SOF-T wide tourniquet that you can apply to yourself one-handed. They give a MIL/LEO discount and they know their business. Founded by former 18Ds and staffed with plenty of experience. They were right down the road from my old house and took me in as a walk-in (not their norm, but I was moving out of state a week later).
Price isn't cheap, but my life is worth it .... is yours? Now for some refresher training.

Website: https://www.tacmedsolutions.com/category/tac-med-kits/
 

Strykervet

Gunny Sergeant
Jun 5, 2011
2,022
327
83
42
Pierce County, WA
#9
I can get almost all military aid gear at a local surplus, PM me if need be. Not many surgical kits, etc., but lots of CLS shit. It's in sealed packages, but can't guarantee the sterility, it's surplus. I look for the best though. Needles and other new sterile shit can be had from medical supply stores online; some of it is very expensive. This is how I'd buy it.

BTW, there is only so much you can do for someone before opening yourself up to a lawsuit --shove that breathing tube in the brain and you'll find out. Fuck up an IV and they can sue --hell, get it right and they can sue! Also, you don't want someone using some of this gear on you if they haven't had the class. Believe it or not, sometimes the best you can do is watch. I go by my instincts, I know what I'm capable of and if I can't do it without thinking much about it, I probably shouldn't be doing it.

Even if you have the class, it doesn't make you an EMT and you are still open to be sued.

Also, you should be able to use everything in a CLS kit with NODs on. If you can't, you still need practice. They also make an illum. device that illuminates blood, can be handy.
 
Mar 13, 2012
655
0
16
SLC, Utah
#10
I've been looking at all the IFAKs on the market and decided to make my own using some of the principles I use on all my pouches, plus my training from SOCM, treating a few bleeders here and there, and being a GSW victim myself. Main thing I wanted provisions for was a lot of hemorrhage control based on what I was trained and what I've seen for a blow-out kit you can carry on your fighting load.

I used daisy-chained elastic webbing, but have noticed that the current trend in med gear seems to be shock cord and cord locks, since the loops never seem to be tight enough, or too tight. We're always experimenting, so I have some ideas for using 1" elastic still that is adjustable for tension that I'll try.







 

pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 6, 2011
5,858
1,708
113
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MA
#15
It looks like 8/28/2015 I initially answered into this thread knowing that a good IFAK is something I need.

Well I dicked about until Jared above jumped and said he could do something about my lack of preparedness.

I took Jared up on his offer to communicate and assist.

I told him I have the need for three kits

1. To go on a plate carrier for work needs. Think gunshots and trauma.

2. To go on my range bag. Think gunshots and maybe the need to deal with a boo-boo.

3. To go on my hiking pack. More likely to be used dealing with the kids getting a boo-boo, maybe a burn of sorts, and possibility to deal with more serious bleeding if need be.

Jared hooked me up with three kits. Leatherman is an old vintage standard type for scale.....

P4267901.JPG

This is the plate carrier IFAK. In addition I had him send me two SOF-T style tourniquets for separate holders that came with my carrier. I think its pretty complete for my level of training and the extra gear is intended to have available to drop and go for someone to self help or others to provide immediate aid.....

P4267902.JPG

The range bag and hike kits are pretty similar and again they provide me with a good spread of treatment options from boo-boo to Oh Fuck.

P4267903.JPG

The care/triage cards are good adds I wasn't expecting.

Ill probably take these all apart and move some around here and their but from the conversations I had with Jared he provided what I asked and in well packaged kits. The canvas gear is made in USA and the contents are OEM not Chinese Ebay knock offs.

I wont go into pricing because what I asked for will differ from what you ask for. I will say that I dont think Jared is looking to get a share of your future earnings because you saved your life with this gear as some companies seem to be doing with their pricing.

Now Im sure real knowledgeable people can probably critique an IFAK and say "Why have that when you should have had this?" but I think that is counter productive.

All I see is the benefit that a guy that procrastinated for three years finally got off his ass and did something about his unpreparedness because someone with some knowledge, access and desire held his hand and made him do so.
 

pmclaine

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 6, 2011
5,858
1,708
113
50
MA
#16
Got them set up......

Hiking with the family.....

P5037908.JPG

P5037912.JPG

Range Bag.....

P5037910.JPG

P5037914.JPG

Work.....

P5037911.JPG

P5037913.JPG

Got some small things to add but Im much better prepped than I was.
 

Tack425

Sergeant
Apr 19, 2011
335
36
28
California
#18
I have been a medic for over 27yrs and am still in the field with my FD. I have had many many variations of kits and gear that has been purpose built by a guy that never has had any experience in what we do. I have found that in most situations the smaller and more compact my kit is, the more likely I am to having it right where I need/want it and not in my POV when I am out at the range. Below are some ideas from guys that have well thought out products that work.

I used the ISTM bags during the 2 week training I took with them. Well put together for the TacMed stuff. A bit expensive, but well thought out:
https://www.tacticalmedicine.com/istm-gear/

A few buddies really like this kit. I have yet to try the PHOKUS stuff but it looks well put together, this may be my next kit:
https://www.phokusresearch.com

This is my current carry as IFAK:
http://darkangelmedical.com

All in all you can't go wrong with stopping the bleeding, because ALL bleeding stops, eventually....Stay safe
 
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