How to control/manage muzzle jump

stradibarrius

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When I watch videos of shooters I notice that the rifle appears to recoil straight back with no muzzle jump. When I shoot I have a muzzle verticle jump and some lateral movement. This requires me to have to reposition the rifle and even the bi-pod. Any help would be appreciated.
 

Steel head

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When I watch videos of shooters I notice that the rifle appears to recoil straight back with no muzzle jump. When I shoot I have a muzzle verticle jump and some lateral movement. This requires me to have to reposition the rifle and even the bi-pod. Any help would be appreciated.
You mean like this?

For me it’s a mix of fundamentals and rifle setup.

Getting the cheek and butt pad just right and abandoning the concept of getting my scope as close to the bore of the rifle helps me.
 
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stradibarrius

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yes exactly, i have tried several shooting positions. Directly behind th rifle, slightly angled. I have tried moving the butt plate up to get th bore line more in a straight line with my shoulder. It must be the way I'm setting up , my technique.
 

Steel head

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yes exactly, i have tried several shooting positions. Directly behind th rifle, slightly angled. I have tried moving the butt plate up to get th bore line more in a straight line with my shoulder. It must be the way I'm setting up , my technique.
The cheapest quality instruction you’ll find Is the online training Lowlight does here.
those vids and discussions are truly awesome.

It’s not just rifle set up or technique, it’s a combination of both.
I found by learning technique find my perfect rifle fit got a lot easier.
 

Rocketmandb

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yes exactly, i have tried several shooting positions. Directly behind th rifle, slightly angled. I have tried moving the butt plate up to get th bore line more in a straight line with my shoulder. It must be the way I'm setting up , my technique.
I did three videos on recoil forces that can be found at the top of the list here:


More than likely you're tensing your shoulder or placing the stock against a particularly had part, like your shoulder blade. Doing so exacerbates any issues you have in positioning and technique.
 
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Reverie Ranges

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Usually position is the issue, but muzzle jump can be caused by other factors. Is there a compensator? Suppressor? Strait Barrel?
You can also try building a soft sled to rest the rifle in rather than bipod use. We built rifle rests out of wire hangers through sleeping mats and covered in duct tape for school use. Cup them in a U shape and attach to a solid surface (heavy rucksack) for extra stability. If the rifle still jumps, it's probably the rifle...
 

stradibarrius

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I am pretty sure it's my technique. It happens with my TRG22-308 with a brake and my Savage LRP12- 6.5 creedmoor, no brake.
 
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stradibarrius

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I did three videos on recoil forces that can be found at the top of the list here:


More than likely you're tensing your shoulder or placing the stock against a particularly had part, like your shoulder blade. Doing so exacerbates any issues you have in positioning and technique.
This is exactly my problem! the 3 videos i'm hoping will resolve my "jump". The first video had the the most helpful information for ME and my problem. These are worth watching more than once. Thank you!!!!
 

wade2big

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1. Heavy gun
2. small caliber
3. muzzle brake

You will have issues if you don’t have at least two of the three that I listed. Technique helps but will only help so much. It’s physics

@stradibarrius describe the rifle you are shooting.
 
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stradibarrius

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I have noticed even some skilled shooters shooting 50BMG with almost no muzzle jump. a 308 or 6.5 creedmoor are not large cailbers and bothe guns are relatively heavy
Thanks for your input!
 

wade2big

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I have noticed even some skilled shooters shooting 50BMG with almost no muzzle jump. a 308 or 6.5 creedmoor are not large cailbers and bothe guns are relatively heavy
Thanks for your input!
Do you have a muzzle brake? Are you shooting prone?

50bmg are very heavy and have muzzle brakes. They push back strongly. They do not snap like smaller rifles. Different animal.
 
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308pirate

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Do you have a muzzle brake? Are you shooting prone?
You can most certainly shoot without a brake and have the rifle come straight back. It is, in fact, the best way to learn to manage recoil and to get straight behind the gun.

For the longest time I shot an unbraked Howa 1500 varmint in 308 w/o a brake. I learned to manage recoil with that thing, believe you me.
 

wade2big

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You can most certainly shoot without a brake and have the rifle come straight back. It is, in fact, the best way to learn to manage recoil and to get straight behind the gun.

For the longest time I shot an unbraked Howa 1500 varmint in 308 w/o a brake. I learned to manage recoil with that thing, believe you me.
I believe you. Shooting prone it’s possible with good technique. Shooting seated at a bench it’s a lot tougher. The OP hasn’t answered what or how he is shooting yet.

Most videos that teach shooting position seems to show only examples of guys shooting rifles with brakes and they are always prone. Guys starting out may not realize the difference. That’s where I was going with that.
 

stradibarrius

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I'm the OP and it happens in prone and seated at the bench. The TRG22 has a brake the LRP12, 6.5 creedmoor does not have a brake.
 

wade2big

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I'm the OP and it happens in prone and seated at the bench. The TRG22 has a brake the LRP12, 6.5 creedmoor does not have a brake.
Yeah I cant help you there. A braked rifle in the prone shouldn't be an issue and the LRP 12 is muzzle heavy for sure. I doubt anyone can help you here. You would need someone to shoot with you.
 

308pirate

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Actually, a lot of people with analytical minds can teach themselves how to shoot correctly, given access to good information.

I have had very little formal training (most of it in clay shooting, very little in rifle and pistol) but am a voracious student and I know how to methodically think through and solve a problem.
 

Dthomas3523

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Brake or no brake. Bullet goes one way, rifle goes the other.

If anything else happens, it’s you.

Brakes just lessen the amount of proper technique needed.
 

hereinaz

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A good, dense rear bag is a great help. It keeps the rifle from sitting down and forces the recoil energy straight back so you can catch it.

Recoil management is a mix of 1) soft dead weight behind the rifle, 2) position, and 3) hand grip pulling the rifle back. In that order primarily.

1) If the rifle bounces off a stiff body, its gonna jump. Its the difference between the bounce of a dead blow hammer and ball peen hammer. Bone and tense muscles are the factors there.

2) if your connection to the rifle is askew, or you are pushing the rifle any direction, then the recoil isn't straight back. Recoil energy is going to be redirected where the rifle is directed.

3) a little rearward tension on the rifle keeps the recoil aimed rearward, and maximizes the amount of recoil absorbed by your floppy, almost lifeless corpse, as you lay there.
 

Pbgt

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I see a rear bad "on end" once in awhile, the shooter fires, bag essentially tips over like a domino and cheek pressure helps shove the rear of the rifle down.
 
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theLBC

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don't try to be a brick wall behind the rifle. make sure your shoulders are square to the target

if you don't allow the recoil to come straight back, it will try to go another direction (up).
 
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Steel head

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I see a rear bad "on end" once in awhile, the shooter fires, bag essentially tips over like a domino and cheek pressure helps shove the rear of the rifle down.
Whenever I see someone shoot higher than others that’s the first thing I look at.