Help ya sleep at night

Srikaleak

Sergeant of the Hide
May 11, 2018
287
113
43
#3
The plutonium that was stolen was a very small amount embedded into a disk the size of a poker chip. It is used as a control for a radiation sensor. The only way that plutonium would become dangerous is if you ate those chips.
 

softcock

novice judgmental prick
Mar 24, 2006
827
104
43
Oregon
#4
The plutonium that was stolen was a very small amount embedded into a disk the size of a poker chip. It is used as a control for a radiation sensor. The only way that plutonium would become dangerous is if you ate those chips.
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I guess it could not get any worse . We should let those guys handle larger weights of plutonium next week, so they can get redemption from there failed act of not securing and letting this smaller weight amount getting stolen .... LOL
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Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
2,454
683
113
42
Pierce County, WA
#12
Plutonium still needs uranium to start the chain reaction and it also requires an implosion device which isn't easy to make. But it could make a nasty dirty bomb. If it falls in the really wrong hands, and what N. Korea and Iran aspire to is the hydrogen bomb. In case you don't know or want a refresher on the difference between an atom bomb and a hydrogen bomb, one 5 megaton hydrogen bomb, not even a really big one, is more powerful than all the ordnance expended during WW2 including all three atom bombs.


Ivy Mike, the biggest US test, completely vaporized an entire island. The Russian 58 megaton Tsar Bomba was a scaled down version of a 100 megaton device. It was air deliverable. With the multi stage Teller-Ullam device, any number of stages can be added to exponentially increase the yield. Most are 2 stage, fission and a fission/fusion stage. The Tsar Bomba was a 3 stage IIRC. A 4 stage bomb could have a GIGATON yield. Nobody has ever built one but it's no harder to do than a 2 stage if you have the materials.

I figure we'll see one detonated somewhere, sometime. Probably an older atom bomb device or a dirty bomb but that's still significant. And it could start a bigger nuclear exchange. All weapons are fingerprinted, you can tell by the isotope not only which country it came from and who made it, but which factory made it. Black flag attacks are worrisome here.

Even if India and Pakistan and a limited exchange, it would still cause a nuclear winter causing all crops to fail and a worldwide famine, not to mention irradiated ash fallout from all burning cities. There's no escaping it, even it's halfway around the globe.

This is serious shit, and if anyone, even Hitlery, sold or facilitated sales of weapons grade nuclear material to an enemy or even an ally under the table in an attempt to circumvent non-proliferation, then her ass should be strapped in the same electric chair used for the Rosenbergs.
 
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Likes: Yasherka

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
4,270
1,298
113
#13
Didn't old children's chemistry sets from like the 40s or 50s used to contain uranium for kids to play with?
Being that the effects of radioactivity was a topic well known especially at that time, there’s no way. Probably the closest thing to packaged radioactivity was radium in the 20s and 30s. Read about the radium girls
 

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
4,270
1,298
113
#15
Plutonium still needs uranium to start the chain reaction and it also requires an implosion device which isn't easy to make. But it could make a nasty dirty bomb. If it falls in the really wrong hands, and what N. Korea and Iran aspire to is the hydrogen bomb. In case you don't know or want a refresher on the difference between an atom bomb and a hydrogen bomb, one 5 megaton hydrogen bomb, not even a really big one, is more powerful than all the ordnance expended during WW2 including all three atom bombs.

They really fucked up big time with a few of those h bomb tests. They completely underestimated the yield on at least one of them because they didn’t realize that one of the lithium isotopes would act as fuel and counted it as inert. As a result, they fucked up a ton of soldiers tasked with observing the blast. Totally destroyed the bikini atoll too and completely fucked over the natives there. Real cut throat shit. But if you want to see the biggest bomb ever, the Russians took the gold by far with the tsar bomba. Fucking 50 megatons dropped on the deserted island of Novaya Zemlya. The blast broke windows almost 500 miles away.
 
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Feb 21, 2013
982
135
43
TEXAS
#16
The control samples are in the micro Currie range, in most cases work extremely low enrichment. The deal with the nuclear materials is everything is supposed to be reported including these very small control samples. Structural/Pipeline X-ray trucks have significantly more material of a very strong gamma emitter Cobalt-60 on board. The good thing about nuclear materials is the ease of detection. I went with my buddy to the scrap yard to get rid of a bunch of scrap from a fence project, the rad monitors got us pulling in the gate with the contaminated drill stem on the trailer. Just some uranium from where the pipe was used, and the oil company didn't catch it.
 
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SilentStalkr

Wonna Be Badass
Oct 8, 2012
557
193
43
37
Somewhere in the US
#18
You guys do understand that there are at least 37 nuclear reactors in universities across the USA right. There is a lot more radioactive material out there than you may want to believe.
There is also certain amounts in highly specialized tools used everyday across the US. I won’t point out the tools for obvious reasons but it’s plentiful. And if you rounded enough of these tools up you could have enough to do something.
 

W54/XM-388

Online Training Member
Oct 1, 2005
2,105
1,557
113
Dallas, TX
#19
They really fucked up big time with a few of those h bomb tests. They completely underestimated the yield on at least one of them because they didn’t realize that one of the lithium isotopes would act as fuel and counted it as inert..
A few side issues, but in the end a most successful result, as that proved the concept and led to the eventual push towards boosted fission warheads which is what most of ours on standby are these days.
 
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