Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#1
Hand Loading for Long Range Ch 4: Powderin’ the thing.

Here we are again. We’re all fired up about hand loading like the big dogs. We got our brass about as perfect as we can & primed, our bullets are in perfect little sorted piles and their noses are clean. We got a great overall length to start with. Now for the last big part- fueling that baby.

But before we get going here let me reiterate a SERIOUSLY IMPORTANT safety note. One of the things we are going to do as upper level hand loaders is to use the book as a guide- but we’re going to decide what the max load is for our own dang self! HA! (insert Tarzan yell)

<span style="color: #FF0000"><span style="text-decoration: underline"><span style="font-weight: bold">And in doing so it is imperative you understand this.</span> </span></span> <span style="font-weight: bold">In the last chapter we learned how to come up with a great starting point in overall length. We found where the bullet was just kissing the riflings, and we extended that position + .010”. So in experimenting with powders and ALL the below instructions we are going to do so WITH EVERY ROUND .010” JAMMED into the riflings. IF YOU DO NOT FULLY UNDERSTAND WHAT IS BEING SAID HERE & WHY- DO NOT LOAD (near) BOOK MAX, MUCH LESS OVER!!! If the load starts with the bullet jammed into the rifling with all other things being even you WILL GET significant more pressure levels. So it’s okay to find ACTUAL max (possibly beyond book max) WITH THE BULLET JAMMED. Because when we later experiment with final overall length, we may end up with the bullet seated out of the riflings, or the bullet jumping from the case into the riflings. “Jump” does not give a pressure spike like being jammed. So we can go from JAMMED (A pressure spike situation) TO JUMP because our chamber pressure will DROP.
</span>
<span style="text-decoration: underline">But if a person were to experiment with max ++ loads with the bullet NOT engaging the riflings, they would ERRONEOUSLY think they found this particular rifles safe max load. And then if they decided to jam it in search for a better shooting load, with thet the associated pressure spike from being JAMMED- and that MAX or MAX PLUS load- he’ll likely lose his eyeballs, some fingers, his hearing a good portion of his face and potentially his life. Got it?
</span>
<span style="color: #FF0000"><span style="text-decoration: underline"><span style="font-weight: bold">START JAMMED- Work *towards* JUMP! DO NOT GO THE OTHER WAY</span></span></span> with near max, max or max plus loads!

Got it!? No? do not proceed! So onto the fun stuff.


I’m gonna walk you through perfoming a ladder test. The ladder test is in my & many precision shooters opinion –the- only way to work up a long range load. It typically saves times, componants and barrel life. How’s that? Because we are only going to shoot -1- round at a given powder charge! Each single round is a rung of the ladder. Sounds like a farce? Keep reading, you’ll get it. There’s only one hang up for the ladder test- it really need to be done at least a decent distance. If you have a place to shoot at least 300(+)yards do a ladder test. 300 minimum, 600 is great, 1000yd ultimate, but it's easy for the wind to blow your hits off paper which knocks the test in the head.

The first thing we need to do is decide on a -or preferably several powders to experiment with. This is done by talking to successful shooters familiar with your cartridge, reloading manuals, Sierra bulletsmiths (800-223-8799) etc.

So how do you do a ladder test? Glad you asked. Let's take say Reloader 15 powder for a hypothetical .308 load. My Sierra manual states 35.8 is a start load and 41.3 is max. I like round numbers. So we’re gonna call it 36g. START, 41g. MAX. Great.

Each single shot load experiment is going to be in 1% increments starting at minimum load and getting 1% hotter with each next round. So what is 1% of our max in this example? Let’s do the math.

41.0 x .01 = .41 So we are in this first coarse test jump .41 grains between each load. Again this first ladder is a coarse (but HIGHLY INFORMATIVE) test. So to save time let's bump it up to full half grain intervals, .5g.

Now make a list of the loads you would load to have a single round from start, to max plus in .5 grain jumps. Write them down.

1\ 36g
2\ 36.5g
3\ 37g
4\ 37.5g
5\ 38g
6\ 38.5g
7\ 39g
8\ 39.5g
9\ 40
10\ 40.5
11\ 41g. BOOK MAXIMUM
12\ 41.5 !MAX plus!
13\ 42g !MAX PLUS!
14\ 42.5 !Max Plus!

<span style="text-decoration: underline">*** write the load number, powder type, and grains on each case of loaded ammo with a sharpie marker. <span style="color: #FF0000">For max and max plus loads i color the neck of the case RED.Don’t skip this.</span></span>


So now you have a mere LESS THAN 14 rounds to shoot and you will obtain VOLUMES of info. <span style="font-weight: bold">MORE SAFTEY ADVICE:
For shots #10 and on proceed with caution, looking and documenting well any signs of excessive pressure. STOP shooting when you detect the least sign of pressure: cratered primer, shiny marks on case head, Extractor/ejector marks, sticky bolt lift etc.</span> WRITE DOWN the actual max load for this powder, this bullet,for this particular rifle in your loading manual and several other places.

Having max and max plus loads will let you know what the actual MAX load is for your particular rifle. My 300 win mag 1000yard rifle does not show pressure with some powders until I'm -three full grains- over book max. <span style="font-weight: bold"><span style="color: #FF0000">ANY loads deemed too hot to be safe to shoot should be pulled apart/unloaded right there at the range for safety</span>.</span>

So now pack up and head to the range. At the range we are going to need a large piece of paper. I keep a roll of brown paper painters paper on hand for all my range shooting. It’sa bout 36”wide and many feet (120'+ ?) come on a roll. Last time I bought some it was $9 @ my local Lowe’s / Home Depot)

We are going to shoot the start load first, and the MAX PLUS load last, all at the SAME AIMING POINT on the paper. So we are going to get a TALL vertical string. So no skimping on paper. From a good solid shooting position shoot each load at THE SAME AIMING POINT. And for once in your life in long range shooting you can ignore cross winds.

Now the creative part you going to mark each bullet hole by it's shot number- referenced by it's powder charge after it's shot because you will have overlapping holes. Shoot one mark one.

There are several ways of doing this whether it be shoot one and walk down and mark it, to really strong spotting scopes (always seems to screw up my ladder tests and I have to start over) DIY target cams, or coloring coding shots by coloring the bullet with a red, green & blue markers accordingly and shooting at white paper. The marker will transfer to the target paper. I'd still not shoot more than 3 before walking. Me?? No- I'd certainly not want it to ever be said I have a faithful & trusted shooting companion down range with a marker standing off to the side of the target board a safe distance and we "shoot one, mark one" as a expedient team.

So what's happening on paper? You will get a vertical string of hits. (don't worry if they shift left and right with the wind, that is irrelevant right now, trust me.) First thought is that it's increasing velocity that makes the hits climb up the target, and that is true to a point. What is also happening for the most part is the bullets are leaving the barrel in a different state of barrel flex, or vibration.

You need to understand this. When you fire your rifle, your barrel flexes in a sine wave pattern. What your getting in the ladder test is the bullet is exiting the muzzle shot to shot, with the barrel flexed more and more up.

BUT, ahah! We got some groups anyway! You will get a few shots that cluster, or actually make a decent group on your target, despite their each one having a(get this) differing powder charge!

ENTER THE "NODE." The node is the very top of the wave and very bottom. For ultimate accuracy, you want your bullet exiting the muzzle precisely when it has flexed all the way up, STOPPED [for a nano second] before it begins it journey flexing back down. This is why you had a decent group or two during the ladder test, despite differing powder charges.

So now your looking at the ladder test target. You got shots all over the place vertically, but some formed nice clusters, or groups.

Note each powder charge that grouped. Let's say for this test, bullet holes 2,3,4 formed a group, and 7,8,9 formed a group.

So this is awesome. In a mere 11 or so shots, we learned at what powder charges the bullets actually leaves the barrel when the muzzle is not moving(vibrating) around wildly.

So now we go home sip a beverage and study and DOCUMENT our findings.
We see 36.5, 37 & 37.5grains shoot in the node of the barrel.

We now take these and do a refined but smaller ladder test. (We do this for the other clustered shots too! Don't neglect to further ladder test any loads that formed a cluster/group.)

So now we are going to load rounds for another ladder test.

Let's jump in finer, .3grn increments now, we are refining things now. Let's go a little outside* this accuracy window (our shots that grouped), powder charge-wise though just for good measure;

1\36.3*
2\36.6
3\36.9
4\37.2
5\37.5
6\37.8*grains

So now we have a good lot of charges with overlap a little each way from the accuracy cluster of the first ladder test. We only loaded one of each charge again. Now go repeat the ladder test/target, and again in a mere 6 shots you will have volumes MORE information. [Don't forget to do this second ladder test for every accuracy cluster/group that showed up on the first test]For each ladder, it is optimal to back up -at least- another hundred yards from the last distance.

You will get another accuracy cluster, all the more dead-on the barrel's node. Let's say shots 2,3,6 again formed a group.

Now you go back and load 5 SHOT GROUPS for each of these:
5@ 36.6 grains
5@ 36.9 grns
5@ 37.2 g.

One of these will prove overall best. Now you got your powder charge! And it is the LEAST sensitive to shot to shot velocity variations due to being at the node.

Now go back with this same powder charge in every round but play with bullet seating depth.. Your at .010” jammed right now. Try a 5 shot group @ - .010 JUMP (not touching the riflings.) Keep trying groups as you move your OAL .010”. You’ll see the rifle perk up and shoot one of these lengths best. Now you got your load.

If you want to try to shave the last couple of thousandth’s off your groups average, play around again the powder charge- load a 5 shot group just slightly under –THE- load and just slightly over and see if things get even better still yet. It may or may not.
Then if you want to be super anal, and can get out to at least 600yds go run primer brand testing too! You might get even more uniform muzzle velocity

This is how 1000 yard bench rest loads are worked up & records broken. You may not choose to refine it to the n'th degree, but running at least 2, ever finer ladder tests as described here will get any rifle shooting nealry as good as it practically can.

I just ran ladder test 1(course) and test 2 (refined) with my .300 win mag (FACTORY savage tac) I'm to where I need to move to 5 shot groups. But, for my 3rd and most fine/narrow ladder test I moved back to 500 yards. I fired two identical rounds to warm my bore and verify my point of impact on the 500 yard target, using a load from the middle ladder test that was already showing a good powder charge. My buddy who was not down range, not helping me from no where near the target board called back on the radio and said "Damn, don't change a thing, sighter shots 1 & 2 are within 3/4" of each other!!

Okay fine! I’ll throw in a picture…

This picture below was the last ladder test I did with my .300 Win Mag Savage Tactical rifle. Each shot was .5 grains hotter (H4831SC powder) than the last.





It's really easy to see exactly where the node is on this target. Shot 1-9 are in the photo but #'s 10 & 11 strung on up the target out the top, not in photo.

Remember that no two of these bullets holes where fired with the same powder charge, but shooting in the node is where it's at- the "four shot group" shown here, #'s 6,7,8 & 9 formed a 3.130" group or .63 moa group @ 525 yards from a factory Savage, with all differing loads. (And obviously in the picture- this was all from wind. I was disregarding and shooting right through wind gusts. There's only .949" of vertical dispersion here or .19 MOA @ 525 laser'd yards.)

Going back and trying my 5 (identically loaded) shot groups should theoretically at least shrink this by half, most likely quitea bit more and identify my rifle's ultimate load with a 210 VLD bullet, and H4831SC powder. From what I have seen thus far with this rifle I'm looking for at least SUB(!) .35 moa 5 shot groups in the end. I'd sure take .2_ moa numbers.
[Note since originally writing this piece- using the processes in this series I have written, I have ended up with two loads (H4831SC & H1000) that are .25moa shooters @ 400 yds.]

Gentlemen and ladies, this is THE way to work up a load, and it won't even take a full box of bullets to do so.

In the next chapter we’ll talk about inspecting loaded ammo. Hope you enjoyed this instructional.

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This instructional took considerable time & effort. It is presented here for free. Enjoy! However if any one feels motivated to express appreciation a donation can be sent to the paypal account nativemant@yahoo.com. No big deal. Thanks! TresMon
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#3
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Thanks bro,

it's a little choppy in the reading. I promised myself I was going to come home & go -straight to bed- (2 hours ago!)

lol.

I'll fix it later.
T
 
Mar 24, 2010
34
0
0
28
Thief River Falls, MN
#4
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Great write up! I do have one question though... In all of your other write ups you are very meticulous about thousandths of an inch, just as you should be while reloading. You say that you should write on the case with a sharpie, and even color code the bullet. Writing on the case with a sharpie could easily add .002", maybe even .003" to the case. Even coloring the bullet could, and most certainly will, add.002-.003". Do you not find any problems with this?
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#7
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it


Thanks fellas.

Jordan H: no sir. Writing on metal with a marker does not add ANY measurable surface height until you move to non standard measuring equipment that reads in (far) finer graduations that a .001".

So for our use here, color away, it makes no difference.
 
Mar 24, 2010
34
0
0
28
Thief River Falls, MN
#8
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Alright, I didn't think it would make to much difference. only reason I ask is because when we would surface tool and die halves and our squareness was off more than .0005" we could sometimes get away with adding a little mark from a paint pen on the bottom of the material to adjust it up. It was tricky, but if you had alot of practice with it, it worked great. We'd also use it to touch off our surfacing wheel by coloring the top, then touching off the wheel until it just surfaced the paint off, then you knew you were at the top of the block. This worked great when grinding gas vents in mold halves where the depths could be as shallow as .0005" Again, like you said, we're talking plus/minus .0001". I might have been a little high on my measurements in my first post. Thank you!
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#9
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Jordan, I have been laid off from the tool & die shop for two years. <span style="text-decoration: underline">It's good to hear someone speak my language.</span>

Yeah, PAINT pen paint makes fine, ultra fine shim stock!
But I have not been able to measure the difference in a sharpie pen mark without going into the gage lab and using a .025 um (0.000001” millionth-inch) super mic!

And if your a tool & die man, you know fire arms are simple and not precise machines. A sharpie mark is the least of your worries!
 
Mar 24, 2010
34
0
0
28
Thief River Falls, MN
#10
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Yes you have to lay a paint pen on fairly thick to get.002" out of it! I played around with a sharpie today for the hell of it and didn't see any change. Also, It's unfortunate to hear of your lay off. The industry has definatly been picking up, hopefully you'll be back out there soon!
 

vman

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 23, 2009
3,728
0
0
34
Australia
www.google.com
#11
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

TresMon do you mind if i collate all of this data into a word document to share around with hide members and perhaps even made into a sticky link?

Im currently in the process of doing this for myself as I like to have lots of reading material around
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#12
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it


Sure, just add my name and e-mail address on a credit to line at the end of the doc.

Happy to help,
Tres
 
Aug 3, 2009
176
0
0
45
Advance, MO.
#13
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Again, another awsome read. Im band new to reloading so all these great articles are a huge bonus. Like Vman, Ive been copy and pasting to a word doc, printing them and taking them with me on the road, so when ever I get a chance, I can squeeze in a little learning. I cant do anything practicaly yet as I work abroad, but will be back state side in a few weeks for a month to try my hand at this. Im sure with all the advice and knowledge that guys (and gals) like your self have to offer, Ill get some good loads sorted (got a new AIAW 300wm just waiting for some TLC).
Cheers.
 
Oct 28, 2008
273
0
16
Colorado
#14
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Tresmon,

If the node is the resting point of the crown at the top of the sine wave is the "anti-node" the opposite resting point of the crown at the bottom of the sine wave? Why is the node preferred to the anti-node? I don't see where it would make a difference.

BTW-Great stuff, this series is very worthwhile.

DVC
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#15
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Mendocino,

The anwser is simple- at the "up" node, you get free bonus elevation.
And this is a long range forum. My limited understanding of physics has a antinode a little different thing than our purposes speak of here.

But let's make this real simple. You want the bullet exiting the muzzle when the barrel is at max flex up. This is good for accuracy, and just so happens to be free elevation.

If a man were to time his ammo/bullet to exit the muzzle at max down flex, thats just all the more elevation he would need built into his scope, or base.

If this was 300 meter benchrest, I would not have mentioned either as being preferred, just needing to be at one or the other.
 
Oct 28, 2008
273
0
16
Colorado
#16
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Roger that. I thought the "bonus" elevation was the reason. I would also like to understand the relationship between barrel length, twist rate, projectile length (engaged with the rifling--I can't remember the technical term), chamber pressure, and barrel contour as it relates to the amplitude of the sine wave relative to the barrel's resting state. I'm sure these equations exist, I just don't know where.
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#17
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it


When you get your head wrapped around all that, write an article!!
I'm waiting...
 

308sako

Gunny Sergeant
Feb 15, 2008
1,194
0
36
118
Brothel Nevada
#18
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Sir, you have once agin done the community a great service. Your extremely well explained and delievered methodology should cost the bullet companies money!
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#19
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

LOL,

So tell Sierra & Berger to send me the equivalent of .01% of the quantity of bullets they sell this year to me half .224" bullets and the other half .308"!


Thanks!
 

clmayfield

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 14, 2008
2,066
1
36
43
San Antonio, Texas
#21
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

The truth is that we don't really know that much about barrel harmonics. The old theory was that you wanted the muzzle to be at the node of the wave because that is where the muzzle is "still." That is actually wrong. The problem with the muzzle being at the node is that while that point on the barrel is still, the trajectory of the bullet is changing at its maximum. So if the bullet is travelling a little faster or a little slower than average, it will be slung at very different trajectories.

If the muzzle is at the top or bottom of an anti-node, however, then the barrel is at max flex and the muzzle actually stops moving as it is changing direction. So if the bullet gets there a little early or a little late, it will still be flung at roughly the same trajectory.

I am not sure about this "bonus elevation" theory though. It is not extra velocity, so the only "bonus elevation" you get is the equivalent of pointing the barrel up an extra minute or so. If you want "bonus elevation," just dial in an extra couple of clicks. I don't think that it matters that the muzzle is at the top or at the bottom of the wave as long as the barrel is at max flex.

Now that is the theory. But does it matter? The point, as Tres demonstrated so eloquently is that at certain MV's, the POI is less sensitive to changes in charge weight and MV. This is one of the arguments against weighing the powder down to the kernel. If you have a properly tuned load, that extra +/- a kernel is not going to matter. I do it anyway because I am anal, BTW... but don't let my neuroses ruin the point. A properly tuned load will allow you to fudge on certain factors that would normally be detrimental to accuracy and still maintain pretty good accuracy.

Tres' Audette ladder demonstrates the point beautifully.
 

High Binder

Resident Tribologist
Jun 18, 2008
514
4
0
Occupied Colorado
#22
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jordanh</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Writing on the case with a sharpie could easily add .002", maybe even .003" to the case. Even coloring the bullet could, and most certainly will, add.002-.003". Do you not find any problems with this? </div></div>

HAhaha, 2-3 Thou... really what kind of sharpie are you using?

I can barely see a .0001" indicator jump when I hit Dykem and Dykem is inherently way thicker than any sharpie could ever hope to be.
 
May 8, 2003
3,037
0
0
78
Mississippi
#24
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Ran your ladder program today with interesting results. Will try to fine tune it this next week or so. Thanks for the write ups. Most of my horizontal problems seem to be "shoulder mirage". FNP
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#25
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it


Happy to help brother!

Tres

Shoulder mirage? That's a new one on me... ?
 
Aug 10, 2009
980
0
0
Ohio
#26
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Is this still possible if you only have 170 yards or should I figure out how to take my reloading bench with me to the range. The range I shoot has the distance(up to 1 mile plus) but it is two and a half hours away.

By the way very well written
Thanks
 
Aug 10, 2009
980
0
0
Ohio
#27
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it


I guess I answered my own question
100yards is not far enough away to get a good read
1-32.5
2-33.0
3-33.5
4-34.0
5-34.5
6-35.0 max
7-35.5 over max
8-36.0 over max
9-36.5 over max Still no signs of pressure but stopped

The dot is 1 1/4 inches



I guess now I have to figure out how to get my reloading equipment to the range
 
Jun 1, 2006
565
0
16
45
McMinnville, Tennessee
#29
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Cool stuff Tres, I am going to have to reread alot of this.
Thanks for your time and interest in the sport enuf to put all this out there for guys like me that dont have the knowledge.
 
Jan 30, 2010
133
0
0
58
Texas
#30
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

On Breeze67's photo, what's going on with shots 2, 3, and 4? I have not tried a ladder test, yet, and only have access to a 200 yd. range conveniently. But, it looks like some kind of node there, even at 100 yards. Is that correct, or am I missing something?
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#31
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it


just two close (range) to make a call. Sure a few assumptions in vertical could be made, but their assumptions.
 
Aug 10, 2009
980
0
0
Ohio
#33
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Breeze67</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I guess I answered my own question
100yards is not far enough away to get a good read
1-32.5
2-33.0
3-33.5
4-34.0
5-34.5
6-35.0 max
7-35.5 over max
8-36.0 over max
9-36.5 over max Still no signs of pressure but stopped

</div></div>

Same loads as before plus 10-37.0 over max
This time the distance was 300 yards
8-9-10 look real good even though they are "over max"

 

mdesign

Gunny Sergeant
Nov 2, 2004
2,089
2
38
Nebraska
#40
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

In the first post it talks of identifying more than one powder to test.

What should be the condition of the bore when the test is begun, fouled with the type of powder we are testing and then cleaned between types of powder?
 

Captain Moroni

Well armed easily annoyed
Jan 20, 2007
1,324
1
0
39
Pocatello ID
www.highdeserttactical.us
#43
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

Thank you for that write up! that is the best description of a ladder test I have ever come across, I hear people talk about "the ladder test" and they have never been able to give me a reason why you would do it other than "thats what the benchrest guys do" and most people I have seen doing it have been shooting 100 yards.

My eyes are open now
Thanks Tucker
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#46
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it



Your welcome.

I'm thankful of all those that helped me along the way over the years.
T
 
Mar 17, 2009
50
0
6
48
phoenix,az
#47
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it

I need some help here. I just had a custom barrel put on my rifle & just tried to do a ladder test. All my shots stayed in about a 3 inch vertical plain at 300 yards. They did'nt climb up the target. They all stayed in the same area on the target. I shot 4064 powder from 41.0 to 44.0 with 175 smk (.308). I did 1 shot of each charge .3 of a grain apart round robbin low to high, high to low, low to high. 3 ladders. From the lowest charge to the highest there is no real vertical change. I've done ladders before & the shots climbed up the target like they should. I got velocities from 2640 to 2830fps.

Is 300 yard just not enough to tell with this barrel? This is my first custom. It's a Shillen 28 inch heavy varmint.
 

TresMon

Gunny Sergeant
Dec 3, 2007
1,147
19
38
NW USA
#48
Re: Hand Loading for Long Range 4: Powderin' it


Yeah, push your range on out- but be excited, sounds like you have a forgiving barrel.
 
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