Gun Safe?

Sep 16, 2011
260
5
18
36
Central Indiana
#1
Wasn't sure where to start this thread.

I am looking into a gun safe and have a budget of around $1,000. Been looking at Cannons in that price range but the more I read, the more I am tempted to spend a little more and go for the Liberty Fatboy Jr 48.

Anyone have any thoughts on this or any recommendations?
 

BurnOut

DDOJSIOC
Nov 24, 2013
1,005
97
48
Dallas
#3
A great bang-for-the-buck option in new gun safes is the Safe Guard line by Champion. Alternatively, you can search your local Craig's List (or similar) for used models.
 
Sep 23, 2007
27
3
3
44
Colorado Springs, CO
#6
A couple things to consider:
What is the value of firearms you intend to place in the safe vs getting gun insurance?
Why do you want the safe, i.e irreplaceable family heirloom weapons so you are looking to prevent theft, high value weapons, or are you just looking to keep honest people honest and kids/teens away. Do you plan on storing important documents, if so you will need to look at fire rating/duration?
Do you move often? If so, overall weight is a consideration. I have a 1K lb Browning Gold Safe and end up moving every couple years being in the Military. If I were to do it again, I would get two smaller safes, say in the 600lb class. The weight also limits where you can put it. Kind of tough on floors rolling a 1K safe over it and forget putting it upstairs or in a basement without a lot of work. Unless you have a bunch of lever action rifles, I would also half the number of guns the company says you can store. Again just things to consider that will help narrow down recommendations.
 
Likes: RickyRodney

Downtown

Full Member
Mar 1, 2013
429
30
28
#7
My apologies because this might be higher than your budget allows. I've more than one safe and the best I've found is Sturdy Safe. Buy larger than you think you will ever need. if I had taken that advice, I might not have more than one safe.
 

Bakwa

Sergeant
Mar 22, 2017
165
13
18
#9
Look up some videos on people breaking into $1000+ safes. Have realistic expectations for what you buy. I'm of the impression that if you aren't getting industrial grade, really high end, or going custom, then you might as well save some money and get a decently fortified safe for under $600. Just my opinion.
 
May 7, 2017
71
15
8
#10
Overkill is the way to go on gun safes. I wish I had over estimated my needs when I bought my second safe because there is not much room left in it either.
 
Aug 17, 2014
56
0
0
Tennessee
#12
A couple things to consider:
What is the value of firearms you intend to place in the safe vs getting gun insurance?
Why do you want the safe, i.e irreplaceable family heirloom weapons so you are looking to prevent theft, high value weapons, or are you just looking to keep honest people honest and kids/teens away. Do you plan on storing important documents, if so you will need to look at fire rating/duration?
Do you move often? If so, overall weight is a consideration. I have a 1K lb Browning Gold Safe and end up moving every couple years being in the Military. If I were to do it again, I would get two smaller safes, say in the 600lb class. The weight also limits where you can put it. Kind of tough on floors rolling a 1K safe over it and forget putting it upstairs or in a basement without a lot of work. Unless you have a bunch of lever action rifles, I would also half the number of guns the company says you can store. Again just things to consider that will help narrow down recommendations.
I couldn't agree more!! However, if you are not going to move often then determine what size you need and buy the next size up.
 
Sep 16, 2011
260
5
18
36
Central Indiana
#13
With my budget, I am leaning towards the Fatboy Jr. I am not planning on moving. I have around 15-17 long guns and some handguns.

This will be going in my basement. It is a walkout basement so I can get it to the back door.

Mainly looking for protection and keeping kids out.

I would like to buy the electrical insert that goes in the back so I can put my goldenrod in there. Anyone know much about the electrical outlets for them? Seems like a good idea but I dont want this to be a weakness in the construction or exterior of the safe.
 

cnk

Private
Aug 12, 2008
26
0
1
NJ
#16
I went with Liberty Fatboy and have been very happy with it. Like others have said, buy larger than you think you need because you'll end up filling the space one way or another. I would also halve whatever gun capacity is specified if you have rifles with scopes on them or bolt actions as those take up more room. Bolt it to the ground and make sure you consider things like how to minimize attack angles on the safe. For example, if you're putting the safe in a corner, put it as close to the walls as possible and if the safe opens from the left side, have the left side against the wall if possible. This makes it more difficult for someone to get a pry bar in there with leverage since the wall will be in the way. Some folks have built fake cabinets to hide the safe or have even gone as far as butchering an old refrigerator/freezer to cover the safe.

As for an electrical outlet, mine came with one. I just plugged in a outlet strip to it and have a mini-dehumidifier, LED lights with motion sensor, and a Golden Rod plugged into it. The access port for the electrical outlet is usually on the back lower right corner and it is sealed. Not really an attack point if you have it against the wall. Also, don't put power tools or other tools that could be used to help defeat your safe in the same vicinity.
 

Cartman

Bird Dogging Expert
May 5, 2007
1,384
0
0
NunYo SoCal
#17
I would like to buy the electrical insert that goes in the back so I can put my goldenrod in there. Anyone know much about the electrical outlets for them? Seems like a good idea but I dont want this to be a weakness in the construction or exterior of the safe.
Don't worry about drilling a hole in your safe. The Goldenrod has a detached plug. You run the wire through and then attach the plug end.
A $1000 gun safe can be cut open in moments. Likely with tools you have sitting in your own garage. For example, a $2 metal cutting blade on circular saw. Or drill a hole (very easy in that thin sheet metal) and stick in a $2 blade on a reciprocating saw. Even a cordless angle grinder will do it. It will cut through like butter.

Residential security containers in this price range are, as someone noted, only good for keeping honest people honest. Or for deterring the dumbest of crooks in the biggest of hurries. No one likes to hear this. Or like to believe something different. But that's the way it is.

As someone else was trying to suggest -- and OP, I appreciate that this may not necessarily apply to you, but I'll write this anyway for others who may come across this thread -- many people on this forum have collections worth over $100,000.00. It is false economy to cheap out on a gunsafe. If you check your insurance policy you'll learn that you actually have coverage for a very low value of firearms without a separate rider.

It is also incorrect to assume that because you bought a $5,000 fancy safe with thick steel walls, or a heavy door, from a big name maker, that you'll be protected. First, any safe can be cracked given enough time, skill, and equipment. Ideally, you'll have a real safe and an alarm system. And the police will get there before the bad guys get in. Thick doors do not equal good protection. One of the other five sides will be attacked. I quickly googled and came across this site. Looks like it will provide some good information and a reality check for many who assume they have more protection than they really do. http://gunsafereviewsguy.com/articles/myths-about-gun-safe-theft-protection/

If your "safe" is not UL rated at least TL-15, it can probably be gotten into pretty darn quick. The link above has an interesting discussion on UL ratings and RSCs. Worth a read IMO.

In my opinion, everyone with a considerable collection should be looking for a TL30x6. That means it stopped UL safecrackers armed with tools for at least 30 minutes of working time ON ALL SIX SIDES. I have no affiliation with either this retailer nor AmSec. http://www.deansafe.com/amsec-cfx-582820-amvaultx6-high-security-safe.html I think they have a model larger and another smaller. The protection here is provided by a high density concrete filled with tool breaking aggregate sandwiched between steel plate.

Additionally, people should understand a bit on how fire ratings are achieved in gun safes. The common solution is sheets of gypsum board. Drywall. As the safe heats, moisture stored in the boards starts steam. In a hot fire you can actually see the wet steam shooting out from around the door. This keeps the inside cooler and from burning. It also gets them wet. So if you're looking to protect papers and electronics you're going to have a problem. Your wood and steel guns are going to be in trouble too if they're going to sit in there for a while after the fire without having the moisture addressed. So water tight bags on your guns, I assume, would keep them dry. If I remember correctly document and data safes actually have beeswax in the door and walls. Do a little research if you need to protect documents and/or, say, hard drives or photos.

I think there's at least one company that insulates their safes like an oven. In my opinion a safe surrounded by a burning building is not like an oven and this solution will not work. If it has a UL fire certification I guess I'm wrong. If it doesn't have its claims proven by legitimate UL testing I, personally, would not buy it.

I hope this has helped some folks. If anyone has any questions let me know. I have done a lot of research about these things over the years. And am happy to help if I can.
 
May 2, 2017
42
0
6
#18
A couple things to consider:
What is the value of firearms you intend to place in the safe vs getting gun insurance?
Why do you want the safe, i.e irreplaceable family heirloom weapons so you are looking to prevent theft, high value weapons, or are you just looking to keep honest people honest and kids/teens away. Do you plan on storing important documents, if so you will need to look at fire rating/duration?
Do you move often? If so, overall weight is a consideration. I have a 1K lb Browning Gold Safe and end up moving every couple years being in the Military. If I were to do it again, I would get two smaller safes, say in the 600lb class. The weight also limits where you can put it. Kind of tough on floors rolling a 1K safe over it and forget putting it upstairs or in a basement without a lot of work. Unless you have a bunch of lever action rifles, I would also half the number of guns the company says you can store. Again just things to consider that will help narrow down recommendations.
+1 great advice

ETA: Funny, I just got an email for "Gun Insurance" after posting here. Not sure if these guys are competitive, but thought I 'd share.

https://collectinsure.com/what-we-in...ESSAGE_SUBJECT
 
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Primus

Gun Snob
Feb 13, 2017
467
162
43
Vancouver, WA
#19
I wouldn't spend alot on one. There are a couple trains of thought here.

1. Buy an expensive "real" gunsafe (AMSEC BF w 4GA liner at a min) and trust that... $5K+
2. Buy an expensive "real" gunsafe and insure your collection.......$5K+ $1K/yr+ policy for $75K worth of shit.
3. Buy a mid range RSC that can be cracked open in less than 5 Mins..... $1500-3500
4. Buy a cheaper safe to house your guns while providing some form of theft barrier $500-1500
5. Buy a cheaper safe + fully insure your guns $500-1500 + $1K per year for $75K worth of shit
6. Scatter your shit all over and just full insure your shit for full value $1K+ per year for $75K worth of shit.

Personally, I would go with #5 or #6 unless you have so much disposable income that it doesn't matter. Even a real TL rated safe CAN be broken into(not to mention someone holding a gun to you or your kids head demanding the combination), and the contents may be destroyed in the event of a fire depending on severity.

Bottom line, First step should be full insurance. After that you can decide how much you want to spend to look pretty or organize all your shit. I don't see the value in an expensive gun safe when I get full replacement value on anything lost/stolen/destroyed. I would much rather build a nice gun room with a quality steel door and alarm, then try to shove all my shit into a heavy steel cage.
 

Cartman

Bird Dogging Expert
May 5, 2007
1,384
0
0
NunYo SoCal
#21
In California, much, perhaps most, of my collection is not replaceable even if insurance were to cover the loss. Of course I'll open anything and eat sand were my kid threatened, but there is the question of securing things while away from home.
 

Primus

Gun Snob
Feb 13, 2017
467
162
43
Vancouver, WA
#22
Primus has a point. For ha-ha's I got an estimate from the place above, a $30K policy was <$300 per year.
Not all insurance is the same. USAA has a no questions asked replacement value for lost, stolen destroyed ect. They are also not some small boutique outfit that may try to deny you claim based on some BS. My only claim with them was painless and money was in my bank account within 24 hours of initiating a claim.
 
Likes: D. Hargrove

308Gunner

Full Bird Private
Jan 22, 2013
639
19
18
47
W TEXAS
#24
Not all insurance is the same. USAA has a no questions asked replacement value for lost, stolen destroyed ect. They are also not some small boutique outfit that may try to deny you claim based on some BS. My only claim with them was painless and money was in my bank account within 24 hours of initiating a claim.
I can attest to this my, I had a claim and had money in the bank in 3 days it took longer because it was a weekend.
 

Mordamer

Professional Know It All
May 11, 2010
614
141
43
Hooker, OK
#27
Get the most steel for your money. I believe the top 2 ways to have your guns stolen from a safe are, 1. Whole gun safe is stolen because it wasn't bolted down, and 2. Safe door is defeated by a prying attack.

Look at companies like Sturdy Safe which make products that emphasize more steel in their designs and are almost impossible to pry into. I will not buy a safe that doesn't have a plate door unless I just need it to keep guns out of reach of kids.

Sturdy may be out of your price range depending on the options you want, but their base model safes are some of the most hard to get into safes for the money.

 
Jun 1, 2017
214
17
18
NC
#28
I would consider the fatboy to be a mid tier safe. There are definitely lower quality ones out there and there are a lot better ones out there too. I agree to buy the most steel you can. Liberty is also running sales on their safes right now i think. With anything else in life you get what you pay for.
 

Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
2,450
673
113
42
Pierce County, WA
#29
Yeah, I got some advice. First is find a safe/vault DISTRIBUTOR, they'll cost much less. Then find "scratch and dent" but be careful because many have glass relocker plates inside and you don't want that damaged. It can be inspected by opening the door that inside the door (it's a panel on some). What scratches and dents some of these safes is the same amount of force it takes to rip a car in half. Know also that dents can mean damaged material inside, as again, many are either lined with drywall or filled with concrete. Drywall for fire, concrete for fire and protection. The concrete will be that vibration settled high psi concrete. Many today, RSC's and high end safes, come with Palusol (sp?) strips along the door frame that swell and expand to seal the door during a fire. But know the concrete using the higher end TL rated safes will offer more protection than will drywall. That said, some use drywall in addition to the concrete because drywall is mostly water and doesn't burn. Know that a gun "safe" isn't technically a safe. It's an RSC, or "residential security container". This means it's been UL listed to stop a 5 minute attack against (I think it's always 2 big men, 6' 200lb. types) using HAND TOOLS with SHORT handles. Five fucking minutes against two assholes with hand tools. I bet you keep the hand tools and the safe in the same room so I wouldn't even have to bring my tools. Buy this to keep your kids out and to protect items against house fires that will be put out "soon". I say soon because with RSC's, they vary from none to fairly high fire ratings. RSC's may have a plate door and you may thing that's sufficient, but I'm here to tell you, thieves don't do doors. They go through the side. It peels open like a tuna can. I'm not kidding. If your door is laminated, I can peel that one too. A SAFE or VAULT as described by UL is put in a category based on protection. They go TL15, TL30, TL30X6, etc. "X6" is an upgrade rating, and highly recommended --it means the walls are the same rating as the doors, so I can't peel these fuckers open. The ones with higher ratings than that are torch proof and then blast proof. You WILL pay for one of those. But for most firearms owners, any one of those would be sufficient and far better than any RSC. Hands down. Problem is you'll need to buy the biggest one usually and they ain't cheap. Expect to spend $6000 for a TL30X6, that's scratch and dent for a dual locking vault. Six inches of steel hardened steel and reinforced concrete... Six tons of fun! In addition, TL rated safes have UL listings like RSC's but in several categories, or rather, the test dictates the category it'll go in. Here they have two big men using hand tools with long handles and powertools of their choosing. They deliver a sustained attack, if one guy takes a break, the other literally steps in without missing a hit. If they defeat it before 15 minutes. it'll be some type of high end RSC I imagine. If it takes longer than 15 minutes, it gets TL15 rating. If it takes 30 it gets a TL30 and so on, up to 90 or 120 IIRC. So it's obvious which one you want --you want a TL30X6. Or even a used bank vault, like from an older, smaller bank. I missed out on an awesome 8' vault with 2ft. thick door --building's new owner just wanted it gone, but I had no way of cutting that bastard free. These are killer deals because if someone has one of these and doesn't need it, it's like a giant fucking rock in the middle of the room! SO, look on CL! Have patience. I bought a used safe on CL, it was too small for rifles but is good for most other stuff (this is a typical problem, most of these safes aren't made for rifles but some of the bigger and nicer ones are and even have interiors). Then I got my big beast of a motherfucker later on. I won't go in to detail, sorry, but lets say attacking it is probably a waste of your time. The risk vs. reward here isn't worth it, I have multi million dollar protection for a multi thousand dollar investment! Overkill isn't a word used to describe safes, but I suppose you could infer that. On the safe, you can get different locks. I forget the name of the UL rated lock, the higher end Sarget-Greenleaf manual combo lock. If you can, get one with dual locks, combo and key. If I have enough time alone with your safe, I don't even need tools, I just need a pad of paper, a pencil and a steth. would be nice. If you have a key, doesn't matter if I can crack your lock or not, I'll still need the key. And they're not normal keys either, can't get 'em cut at the store and they have eight inch handles just to fit in the lock and they have to go through spring loaded shutters. These won't be picked, not unless that's been your 9-5 for the last 20 years or more. Now for tricks. One thing you can do is say "fuck it" and build a vault. If you are handy at construction, just build a hard to get to, solid concrete wall and pour it around a door you pre-purchase. Now you'll have a nice walk in, rating those is more difficult but also rarely necessary. Here you'll be able to dictate the entire project. If building a new house, this is definitely the way to go. If saving money and forced to go with an RSC all is not lost. The doors, though only having one lock, are usually pretty tough. If you install the RSC in a corner of a brick or concrete room and build a concrete wall on the opposite side (such that the safe is in a nook with only the door being accessible) this adds considerable protection, especially if the concrete is reinforced with rebar at least. IF you have the right setup, you can even forgo the safe and use concealment only. But this has to be shit tight. It can't be accidentally found or dead space reckoned from the outside (bigger on the outside than the inside for example). Buried cargo containers and shit come to mind as do false walls, etc. I left a lot out because I could go on forever on this. PM me if you need any specific advice regarding safes. If in Western WA or Northern Oregon I can point you to a good distributor. Yeah, you do in general get what you pay for but know that those ratings are those ratings, period. Some safes go in excess of what they test for, but the maker didn't pay for that test. Or they make it to 29minutes, 29 seconds and the stopwatch stops. It's not a TL30, it's still a TL15. This is a good thing to know, to know how they rate safes and vaults. These UL rated safes also have limits on what can be insured inside, so a large TL30X6 may be good for in excess of $5million? Small TL15 I think was good for $500,000 but times have changed. Most insurers demand or require you to have an X6 rated safe. Good luck, just go into this well informed because I promise you, most all of the guys selling these know fucking jack all. If you go to a distributor, you have a higher chance of finding someone that does know the product, probably find someone that knows 'em inside and out. Call around to lockpicks, on occasion they get free stuff including safes. Some resell them, some know where good ones are sitting for a good price. It'll be costly, but it'll be worth it in the long run. The better you get, the better off you'll be, the better you'll sleep. Finally, buy a goldenrod dehumidifier and one of those Driz-air or whatever the fuck they call it that uses pellets to suck the water out of the air. The combo of the two does pretty well at preventing rust. You want to use 'em both together because neither is totally reliable but the two together work pretty well. When installing wires in a vault, be very careful (you don't want a fire inside the damn thing) and you don't want a large hole in the vault for the wires. No hole is best, but I think 3/8" is the maximum size a hole can be in one. Just enough to fit a small piece of romex and a couple phone wires, enough for light and security. JB Weld the shit out of this hole, inside and out and pack it in good.
 

bikeracer

Formerly Robb57
Aug 10, 2011
134
30
28
61
#30
I just bought a Amsec TL 30 used for $3000 including delivery and boltingit to the floor - it's amazing what you can find if you have a local locksmith who sells used safes. This is a 60x32x30 with 1" steel plate at the sides and back and a massive 3" door. This is a bank safe - not a gun safe. They will put a new coat of paint on it, a new S&G dial lock and pull the door and service the hinges. The retail on a safe like this is probably close to $10K without delivery. I bought a used TL15 about 15 years ago for $2K. I don't care about finish or the interior so for me a used bank safe is the way to go.
 
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Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
2,450
673
113
42
Pierce County, WA
#31
I just bought a Amsec TL 30 used for $3000 including delivery and bolted to the floor - it's amazing what you can find if you have a local locksmith who sells used safes. This is a 60x32x30 with 1" steel plate at the sides and back and a massive 3" door. This is a bank safe - not a gun safe. They will put a new coat of paint on it, a new S&G dial lock and pull the door and service the hinges. The retail on a safe like this is probably Close to $10K without delivery. I bought a used TL15 about 15 years ago for $2K. I don't care about finish or the interior so for me a used bank safe is the way to go.
LOOK FOR GOOD DEALS. Be patient. You can get a TL30X6 Original, the biggest one they make with dual locks delivered for $6000. Seriously, no shit. Just buy last years model, they're identical, and a "scratch and dent" (be careful on what constitutes a scratch or a dent!). $10k for a delivered TL15 is a bit high IMO/E. Oh, the Original I'm talking about comes with a few different interiors, including one for firearms --black carpeted shelves and racks. Very nice. Due to cost, get the biggest one they make. You don't wanna buy another later if you don't have to.

I have a TL15 or TL30 that's smaller, and yes, they ARE the way to go. IMO, "Original" is the better brand but I knock Amsec not! My smaller one is an Amsec and basic bank vault with no liner, just steel shelves. What you have is exactly what I was talking about (which some generous soul "disliked"). That persons should be more consistent and dislike all posts on here recommending TL rated safes.

A TL30X6 is the standard now, means the sides, top and bottom are as tough as the door. Finding large ones to accommodate firearms is sometimes difficult though. Locksmiths are a good source but IME large safe distributors are the best. Best selection, best prices, more deals and better access to other deals. They resell used ones too. FWIW, $6k will get you the largest TL30X6 Original makes with dual locks (combo and key).

Your Amsec TL30 is a FINE safe and far better than any RSC you'll find at any "gun safe" sellers.

Note that TL ratings come from a time test. If it is broken before 30 minutes, it gets the TL15 rating. If it breaks after 30 minutes or doesn't break at all and they stop after 30 minutes, it gets the TL30 rating despite the fact it may resist attacks for 45 or even 60 minutes. It depends on what the mfg. pays to have it tested and to which standard. But know some can withstand attacks quite a bit longer than they are rated for. This is seldom the case with RSC's, and if you include power tools on RSC's, you may as well use a shoe box as it's cheaper.

PS, on your safe since you said they are doing work on it, I'd make sure the lock spins freely and get the best lock in you can --SL makes a few different ones, they all look the same. They shouldn't be stiff --if they are they're harder to open and sometimes you have to do it over and over to unlock it. Mine is sluggish and I need to replace or clean it out.
 

bikeracer

Formerly Robb57
Aug 10, 2011
134
30
28
61
#32
To be clear - when I said $10K I was talking about a large TL-30 not a TL-15 - and yes they showed me a new TL-30x6 - incredible but more than I need - or want to spend. For anyone in Colorado PM me and I'll give you the details on where I bought mine - they deliver all over the Rocky Mtn. region.
 
Sep 14, 2011
487
32
28
58
#33
Whatever you get, make sure you bolt it to the floor/wall. Even the heaviest safe can be taken out of a house with enough people.
Yup, I moved an 800 lb safe by myself, even had to pick it up off the ground after I dropped it on its back off the trailer.
 
Nov 13, 2011
109
10
18
37
Dallas, tx
#34
Also be carful with fire ratings. There is no industry standard on how to conduct the tests, so you can not compare them Apple to Apple. As others have said think of why you are getting a safe. Fire protecection, theft, family etc?

i know some people got some good high quality steel lockers and use those
 
Dec 7, 2017
111
3
18
#35
The advice I would echo above is to buy bigger than what you think you'll need. You dont want to have to upgrade in the future after you've lugged one into your house and filled it up. Also make sure you buy a brand that covers your valuables in the case of a fire.
 

Thunderhorse

Sergeant of the Hide
Jan 31, 2018
201
63
28
Central MO
#37
I have a Fatboy 64 and I'll be running out of room after a few more purchases. Gun safe capacity ratings are very optimistic; if you have all shotguns or Ruger #1s then maybe that many will fit, but bolt knobs on bolt action rifles or even handles on semiautos will take away space to set them next to each other, pistol grips and optics take up room in front of and behind. I would divide the advertised capacity by 3 to get a realistic number of guns a safe will hold
 
Likes: Spblademaker

Ep1985

New Hide Member
Feb 18, 2018
89
33
18
Oklahoma
#38
Everybody told me to get bigger than I needed and I didn't listen. Now my safe is full and I am having to get another. Get as big as you can possibly afford. BEAR safes in oklahoma are amazing.
 

Average_Joe

101st ABN, Combat Vet.
Oct 20, 2017
5
3
3
#39
Do not waste your money on a $1000 safe. It will offer you zero protection from anything aside from your children having access to your guns.

ALL Liberty Safes are crap, especially the fatboy. 14-16 gage steel can be defeated with a claw hammer! (Sorry boys) Liberty does NOT even make a “safe.” They make residential security containers. They have a very effective marketing team.

Sturdy, Superior and America Security offer actual “safes”, but they will exceed $5k. These are Class-B and above rated safes. (1/2 doors, 1/4 side plates)

Do your research. Save your money for a real safe and get insurance on all your guns.

Here is what I saved for and purchased. Class-B rated. That means a professional can get into it in about 5mins. It will most likely take the average crackhead with power tools 30mins to get into it. By then, my alarm will have the cops there. Moreover, if the guns are stolen, I have additional insurance to cover my noise makers.

Good luck!
 

Attachments

Jul 17, 2008
52
7
8
34
Salem, NH
#40
I own a Cannon 64. When we originally bought our house I didn't have one and was storing everything in a closet with a lock until I had some extra $$$ to finally pick up a safe. Got it from Tractor Supply on a Black Friday special for $699. I hated the fact that the interior was tan, so I used black automotive carpet paint and re-sprayed it. Surprisingly it came out great, along with a set of Torchstar lights from Amazon it is like a new safe. You will def get what you pay for though, the material is super thin, took about only a few seconds to run a drill through the back of it to run power into. Im happy with it overall for now, someday when I buy my forever home I will throw down good money on something of quality, but for now the Cannon isn't all that bad.
 
Likes: RickyRodney

nitemask

New Hide Member
Feb 13, 2018
4
0
1
#43
I have a Hollon. 10 Gauge steel and less expensive than some of the others. i swapped out my SG for the Securam whcih allows both electronic keypad as well as manual dial backup.
 

D_TROS

Flag-Sword-Cross
Aug 19, 2010
1,331
109
63
North Denver, CO
#44
dang....anyone want a good deal on a Liberty??

I feel like running home and taking everything out of the safe lol. if you woulda said you could break in with a axe I woulda called you a liar. ugh
:sick:
 
Apr 11, 2010
28
10
3
35
Fresno, CA
#48
Wasn't sure where to start this thread.

I am looking into a gun safe and have a budget of around $1,000. Been looking at Cannons in that price range but the more I read, the more I am tempted to spend a little more and go for the Liberty Fatboy Jr 48.

Anyone have any thoughts on this or any recommendations?

I have the Fatboy and unfortunately you'll end up filling it faster than you think. "Unfortunately" because looking back I wish I had something with more long gun capacity. Whatever safe companies tell you for long gun capacity (i.e. holds 24 long guns) feel free to cut that in half as you don't want your guns rubbing up against each other if you've got nice wood on them without using some kind of rifle sock. I think I could get 24 rifles in there if they were all the size of my first rifle...a Chipmunk 22. Otherwise cutting the number in half is good practice. I also purchased a different shelf as the shelves that come with the Fatboy aren't really easy to get rifles in and out. Personal preference but I prefer the shelf shown here on the bottom of this page:

http://www.libertysafe.com/flex-interior-installed-lm-3-p-39.html

On my Fatboy I also really like the door organizer with all the pistol pouches. It's nice to be able to open the safe and see my pistols and not have to reach in to grab one (I know, lazy, right?).

One more thing that I would highly recommend...make sure you get a power outlet inside the safe. I believe the Liberty's come with one as I have one in my Fatboy but I'd check to make sure. It's nice because the lights that come with your safe (that are motion activated) chew through batteries like crazy. So I'm in the process right now of buying an LED light strip and mounting it inside the door frame of the safe so it provides light throughout. The Liberty light strip is really expensive and an LED light strip from Amazon is cheap.

I also bought the S&G D Drive lock because the reviews said they're more reliable. But to date I've never heard of the standard lock failing on those safes.

Anyway, good luck on your search. Hopefully this info helps.
 

Thunderhorse

Sergeant of the Hide
Jan 31, 2018
201
63
28
Central MO
#49
I have the Fatboy and unfortunately you'll end up filling it faster than you think. "Unfortunately" because looking back I wish I had something with more long gun capacity. Whatever safe companies tell you for long gun capacity (i.e. holds 24 long guns) feel free to cut that in half as you don't want your guns rubbing up against each other if you've got nice wood on them without using some kind of rifle sock. I think I could get 24 rifles in there if they were all the size of my first rifle...a Chipmunk 22. Otherwise cutting the number in half is good practice. I also purchased a different shelf as the shelves that come with the Fatboy aren't really easy to get rifles in and out. Personal preference but I prefer the shelf shown here on the bottom of this page:

http://www.libertysafe.com/flex-interior-installed-lm-3-p-39.html

On my Fatboy I also really like the door organizer with all the pistol pouches. It's nice to be able to open the safe and see my pistols and not have to reach in to grab one (I know, lazy, right?).

One more thing that I would highly recommend...make sure you get a power outlet inside the safe. I believe the Liberty's come with one as I have one in my Fatboy but I'd check to make sure. It's nice because the lights that come with your safe (that are motion activated) chew through batteries like crazy. So I'm in the process right now of buying an LED light strip and mounting it inside the door frame of the safe so it provides light throughout. The Liberty light strip is really expensive and an LED light strip from Amazon is cheap.

I also bought the S&G D Drive lock because the reviews said they're more reliable. But to date I've never heard of the standard lock failing on those safes.

Anyway, good luck on your search. Hopefully this info helps.
FWIW there are 2 fatboys-the 48 and the 64. I have the 64
 
Oct 30, 2017
101
5
18
Colorado
#50
After actually going through a fire a couple years ago I would recommend not going with a cheaper safe. We had a couple smaller middle of the road Liberty safes like you would pickup at cabelas and a 1980's double door Meilink safe I bought for a really good deal but didn't know much about. First off how long it takes for the fire department to get to your home makes a difference and where in the house/garage the safe is located is huge. I'm in a rural area so response time was around 35 minutes (kudos to our vfd because that is a good response time for the distance they traveled). One of the Liberty safes was very close to where the fire started and that was in the middle of the garage/house so the fire burned there the longest and didn't get water very quick. The other two were near an exterior garage wall and the FD was able to get water on them pretty quick and keep the temps down somewhat. The liberty safe in the middle was toast and so were the guns in it. Anything synthetic or rubber melted completely off and finishes were destroyed from heat and smoke. Optics were completely destroyed. The liberty safe near the exterior of the garage was burned bad but the guns inside for the most part only showed smoked damage except for a few heat damage spots near the seam of the door. The Meilink near the exterior wall showed no heat damage inside but some definite smoke damage. Where the handles and locks were gone or damaged we just cut into the safes to retrieve the guns and it was interesting what we found. Safe in the middle of the house/garage had virtually no gypsum board left intact. Most was crumbled up and laying in the bottom half of the safe between the shell and liner. The liberty safe near the exterior had some pretty major compromises in the gypsum liner but was intact for the most part. The Meilink was a different deal. Once the outer shell was cut we found a solid concrete type poured in insulation. Besides smoke damage because it's door seals were old and shrunk up there were no real signs of excessive heat anywhere. So my take away from this experience is that a safe needs to have some sort of poured in concrete fire liner and a two stage door seal system. The first seal needs to seal out smoke till the paulsol heat expansion seal gets hot enough to expand and seal. A metal liner is a big plus for theft deterrent as well. Keeping the smoke out is a big deal. I have never seen something so corrosive as smoke from a house fire!!!!!! Hope this information helps and I hope you guys never have to go through it!!
 

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