good,bad, or ok

riddle326

Private
Minuteman
Aug 7, 2019
19
4
6
I have just started shooting this last summer. I recently went to a friend of a frends range this last sunday who had a range that went past 200yds. I shot a 5 round group at 435yds and had a 2-5/8 in spread. Is this considered ok, good bad?? I know its sub MOA but not sure how to classify it yet.
 

Jack Master

Conquistador
Online Training Access
Belligerents
Minuteman
Aug 7, 2018
289
377
69
^^^ What he said. Hammer away and see if you can do it again.

My book goes like this...
Great = Less than 2.5"
Good = 2.5 to 5"
Okay = 5 to 7"
Ugly = More than 7ish.
 

Matt_KJ

Gunnery Sergeant
Belligerents
May 27, 2019
184
62
34
VT
Take it and continue to refine it. You’ll only get better with time!
 

CygnusX1

Sergeant of the Hide
Belligerents
Minuteman
Dec 22, 2019
130
80
34
Quebec, Canada
Man, thats a hair over 0.5 MOA at over 400 yds (y) (y)
The key is to repeat it regularly and to understand what might prevent you from repeating this, ....fix it.... and move to 500 yds

Less than 1 year shooting and you get this result ?
What are you shooting with ?

Share with the "Hide" ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: lead.rain

Tylerm713

Sergeant of the Hide
Belligerents
Minuteman
Jan 28, 2020
121
70
34
Houston, TX
If you can repeat that, it's great. I think just about anyone other than the most hardcore PRS guys would be happy with .58 MOA at any yardage. The biggest thing is to establish what accurate means to you. For some, it's being consistently at .25 MOA. Others (many) are happy to just be under 1 MOA.

Out of curiosity, what rig are you running?
 

lead.rain

Private
Minuteman
Feb 2, 2020
81
32
24
That's pretty damn good for someone who has only been shooting for under a year. There are a lot of people who would be happy with that group.
 

DownhillFromHere

Aim > Impact > Take a Nap
Belligerents
Minuteman
Nov 30, 2017
572
499
69
I know its sub MOA but not sure how to classify it yet.
If you already know this, skip it... but if not, here's how you classify.

A Minute of Angle (MOA) is an angular measurement equal to 1.047 inches at 100 yards. Emphasis on angular - so the farther you go from the muzzle, the greater the linear span the angle subtends (it's been four and a half decades since the last geometry class so my terminology may be off). So the easy math is to multiply each 100-yard multiple by 1.05, then divide your group size by the result. So:

4.35 * 1.05 = 4.6" ==> that's an MOA at your stated range (e.g., 100 yds = 1.047" , 200 yds = 2.094" , 300 yd = 3.141" etc.)
Now divide your group size by that result to get your group size in MOA: 2.625" / 4.6" per MOA = 0.57 MOA

As others have said, that's good shooting. I had a TAC A1 as my fist rifle; it was very capable and the only reason I sold it was to take advantage of an offer on a custom rifle I liked. Keep it up!
 

Sticks

That guy
Belligerents
Minuteman
Oct 5, 2018
265
79
34
Pondwater Colorado
Or the simple way to think if it is 1 inch group per 100 yards being... Meh, acceptable (never settle for less). That turns into really good if you are keeping a 8" group at 800 yards (sub MOA by the math lesson above).

The farther out you go, the more variables you have to deal with, and the more impact to the POI from little influences you have, like simply having to squeeze the rear bag a little harder than usual.

When I get out to practice, I keep my plates at 1.50 MOA or less. My 735 plate is an 8" circle.

If your groups are flat and wide (400 yard group is 1" tall x 4" long), especially at longer distances, then you are doing really good, just need to deal with either wind, or your shooting position.