Getting Started

RickyR

New Hide Member
Mar 12, 2018
3
0
1
#1
Yup another newbie, Not my fault guys the guy at Cabelas suggested I ask here. I'm looking into trying my hand at some longer shooting say 500+ to start with, if things go well further. I rather not dump a lot of funds at first to see how things go. I've googled videos on the subject looking for information and it was mentioned starting with a 223 since most people already have one. So I am going to start with a rifle I already have, a semi auto 223 with a 1-7 twist, 16" barrel. The rifle has a scope but after some reading on here the Vortex Crossfire 2, 2-7x32 isn't the optic to have.

I would like to do some varmint hunting, target shooting,bench rest, etc. If I can get the equipment more capable, then I can see if I can get the shooter up to speed. I would like to keep the price of a scope below $800, and from what I've read here to be more accurate first focal plane.

I went to the range last weekend to re-familiarize myself with the rifle because I've been shooting mostly pistol the last few years. I didn't do too bad for me but need lots of improvement. IMO

I was using Hornady Black ammunition 62 gr at the range to zero the rifle at 100 yds, my group was 5 shot 2" nothing to brag about, more point and laugh to you guys. As I said I've never really tried any distance shooting other than deer with a 30.06 and missed most of those...
 

diverdon

Online Training Member
Dec 21, 2011
2,770
928
113
WNY
#2
Let me address the first focal plain point you made. The purpose of the FFP is not to improve accuracy. The purpose of the FFP is so that the features of the reticle cover a constant angle regardless of magnification.

This can make it easier to communicate with a spotter or it can make it easier to use the reticle to range a target. Suppose you have a spotter, the spotter can tell you that your first shot missed my one mill right, if you have a ffp scope with a mil reticle just hold one mill left and shoot again. A SFP scope would only allow you to do that at one magnification.
 

steve123

Lt. Colonel
Mar 16, 2008
7,359
280
83
Flagstaff, AZ
#3
The best value I've seen at that price range is the Athlon Ares BTR 4.5-27x50. A friend has one on his 20" AR, it's a very well done scope.

Try some other 223 match ammo offerings, you might find one that'l do 1" or a little less at 100Y.
 

Bender

Something witty here
Feb 12, 2014
2,527
2,005
113
Cheyenne WY.
#4
That 1:7 might spin a 75g good. Check groups but it will doo 500+ with ease. Try looking at a SWFA fixed 10x. It would be awesome on a fast twist AR. Should get you to 700 or so.
 

spife7980

Full Member
Feb 10, 2017
3,506
576
113
TX
#5
Just a little info to hopefully help guide your choice.

The first focal plane reticle will scale at the exact same ratio as the target at all magnification levels, it is placed in front of the zoomy part so the angles it represents is always the same no matter the magnification.

A second focal plane scope stay the same with magnification while the target size will change relative to the reticle. It only truly subtends at one magnification, it is behind the zoomy part so the target grows while the reticle stays the same size. If it subtends so that at 10x a dash represents 1 mil at 5x that same line will represtna value of 2 mil. At 20 power it would be .5 a mil.

1520957754184.png


This does not change the center of the scopes point of aim or the value that the turrets adjust the scope. No matter what the reticle says .1 mil on the turret will always be .1 mil.
So if youre shooting at known ranges and know how much you need to dial then the zoom plays no part. However if you dont know how far exactly something is but can measure how far you missed with the reticle there is zero conversion for a front focal, what you see is what you dial. With a second focal plane you would either need to dial to the correct magnification to measure or you would need to be able to do the conversion to match your magnification level.
If you dont want to dial then you can just use the reticle to hold over, its only using the reticle to measure how much to dial that matters.
 

spife7980

Full Member
Feb 10, 2017
3,506
576
113
TX
#6
I would recommend a good variable scope like a 3-15 or something, a bit more zoom allows you to hold more precisely for shooting your paper targets where as the low powered you have now is a bit tough to be more precise with.

The 10x SWFA is a default recommendation as it is a solid fundamental scope. It doesnt have any bells and whistles but it works just fine. And its only like 300.

The 3-15 is a bit more adaptable with the same reputation for working, its a bit more pricey but it is solid on the fundamental functioning. The reticle kind of pales compared to other newer scopes but the newer scopes dont have the track record of performance yet.

A athlon talos btr is 300 and on the same price level as the swfa 10x only it is a 4.5-14 with a great reticle, I have one on my 22 and its pretty perfect in that application, it would be right at home on a budget 223 ar.

Weaver has a tactical 3-15 scope for 500 on natchez, its got a dated reticle and is heavy but it should be a good value.

There are some new offerings from nikon and sig that fit inthat price from well but are new and dont have the track record. Lots of options. Too many to list really lol
 

Rvpilot

New Hide Member
Feb 4, 2018
8
2
3
#7
I've had great luck with my inexpensive Weaver 6-24 power V Series Scope. It's on Burris Signature Zee rings with inserts to get more MOA adustment out of the 1 inch scope. Good for working up loads or varmints and shooting out to 700 yards on steel. On sale here. https://www.natchezss.com/
Runs around $360.00 most of the time. I really like mine.
 

RickyR

New Hide Member
Mar 12, 2018
3
0
1
#8
Thanks guys, I'll take all the information I can get. I gather from the focal plane information it really doesn't matter what focal plane a scope has, it's merely a matter of preference it isn't going to effect shooting ability of the scope. I'll check out the one suggested. I've hunted for years but this is the first I've heard of these scope manufactures, must just move in different circles. Thanks again.
 

spife7980

Full Member
Feb 10, 2017
3,506
576
113
TX
#9
it really doesn't matter what focal plane a scope has, it's merely a matter of preference it isn't going to effect shooting ability of the scope.
To a certain extent...

For PRS being able to rapidly make adjustments is a big deal with having to hit 5 targets in 90 seconds from different positions, a high powered second focal plane scope is like shooting yourself in the foot to some degree.

For benchrest it couldn't matter less, the target has the gradients printed on it so the reticle subtensions become less important. Thats also why many bench scopes are just a cross hair with a single dot in the middle.

Just like in golf you have different clubs for different scenarios, theres different scopes for different shooting scenarios and it takes an understanding of which scenario you see yourself in most often to know which club is the proper choice.
 
Top Bottom