Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Dan K-another fellow noob here!

Great post. I started working with DTA a few months ago with pretty limited previous experience. Now as a by-product of working here, I'm getting some exposure and time behind the guns.

Been a lot of fun. For me, the biggest determining factor in my consistency has been follow through-particularly pulling the trigger all the way through and not slapping it...looking forward to more!

p.s. been shooting the DTA covert with a 16 inch barrel in .308
 
Dec 2, 2009
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GEORGIA
Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1479256293/

Up to date precision rifle read called Precision Rifle B.I.B.L.E (Ballistics In Battlefield Learned Environents), with a lot of good info from US Special Operations Snipers.
19 chapters. Info in regards to revised fundamentals, wind (basic, advanced, mountain, and urban),various ballistics, kestrel, ballistic software, high angle, shooter myths, increasing precision, etc.
Check it out.
 

mouse07410

Gunny Sergeant
Jan 5, 2010
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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sniper33</div><div class="ubbcode-body">http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1479256293/

Up to date precision rifle read called Precision Rifle B.I.B.L.E (Ballistics In Battlefield Learned Environents), with a lot of good info from US Special Operations Snipers.
19 chapters. Info in regards to revised fundamentals, wind (basic, advanced, mountain, and urban),various ballistics, kestrel, ballistic software, high angle, shooter myths, increasing precision, etc.
Check it out.</div></div>
Is the any relationship between this book and FM 3-05.222?
 

Graham

Generalissimo
Oct 30, 2007
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Michigan
I know a great place to learn the fundamentals and they will actually pay you while you do it! The only cost is 4 years of your life.
Have they begun teaching the fundamentals again? Because I haven't seen it lately.

I'm siding with 1SJ: USAMU. That, or Rifles Only.
 
Jun 20, 2012
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Absolutely great info here! I've been infantry (USMC 0311 rah!) for over 5 years now and I still keep learning! Those basic fundamentals make such an enormous difference. I started off in boot camp as a Sharpshooter (M16A2), then dropped to Marksman on an M16A4 (ACOG). I blamed it all on the weather (40 degress out, 30mph crosswinds, and rainy). I didnt think that I was doing anything wrong.

This past rifle qual I asked one of our Scout Snipers to help me with my snap-in and mentor me. We literally changed everything: my bone support, trigger control, trigger finger placement, re-learned how to compensate for wind with my ACOG (qualled this time with an M4), and my follow through. I took it all to heart through the 3 full days of snap-in we did and it paid off. I shot Expert Marksman with all of my 500yd shots in the black. The only position that I had issues with was the kneeling (I shot better standing lol!)

Lesson learned: never think that youre not at fault and humble yourself and ask for help. There is no shame in admitting that you suck at something and that you need help to improve.

Hopefully this summer I can get my first bolt action rifle and begin my adventure with long range shooting!
 
Jun 27, 2010
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It's pretty sad to see so many people who think they can't be taught to shoot because they know it all. I don't often agree with Sterling Shooter but this thread is not one of those times.
 

CCCP2k

Sergeant
Nov 30, 2011
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Canada
My coach has a saying when he teaches people to shoot:
"There is no magic or hidden secretes in shooting. Advanced shooting is proper application of fundamentals plus practice."
I still hope that the old fox hides something behind his sleeve but I have not found anything yet. Maybe that is it.
 
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Dec 15, 2010
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Rayville, La.
Calling the shot was mentioned in the article and I'd like to add something to that comment. Forty years back the Russians did much research work concerning their Olympic shooters and vision. What they discovered was that if the non-aiming eye was closed there was a loss of visual acuity of up to 28% in the aiming or dominate eye. Many shooters do not focus their vision in the right location at shot break because the shooter has his/her focus upon the target and the reticule is seen by the secondary vision! This is not correct. The focus should be upon the intersection of the cross hairs at shot break and if this is done the shooter will learn how to make an accurate call as to POI! To avoid possibly double vision by keeping both eyes open...if need be the shooter should blind the non-aiming eye with some form of opaque blinder!
 
Feb 15, 2017
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Thanks guys. Great thread for the fundamentals and group therapy. I can now get 5 shots on a 1/2" dot and hit 5 of 6 hits on a slow and simplified dot drill but realize I still know almost nothing about so many things in the rifle shooting world. The issues I face seem to be shared by many and that is comforting but also reassuring me that even I can do better at more positions and under less than perfect conditions with the right practice. I'd head back to the range today (went yesterday) but hunting Easter eggs with my grandchildren seems paramount today.

Next, get off the bench and go prone.
 
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