First PRS Practice recommendations

Mar 3, 2013
68
12
8
#1
I’m shooting at my first PRS match at the end of next month and I’d like to get out and practice at least twice before the match. What would you experienced shooters recommend? I have access to tons of pallets I plan on using for barricades. Any specific drills that will help?
 

Rob01

Super Mod/Team Blaster
Staff member
Jul 9, 2001
9,514
443
83
NC
www.teamblaster.net
#4
Practice getting in and changing positions and getting on target fast. That is where most people lose valuable time in that they mess around trying to find the perfect spot for the shot. You need to find the good spot that will make the shot hit.
 
Likes: Timgunner
Jul 2, 2014
421
84
28
London, KY
#5
It's in the link, and mentioned by Rob, but it cant be over stated. Work on finding targets quick and remember your gun has a mag ring. My first match I timed out on 2-3 stages because I set the scope to 25x and didn't touch it again until it was over. The first piece of gear I bought outside of what I already owned for general LR shooting was a mag throw lever. Prone I can find anything in a heart beat even at 25x. Shooting support side of a 55 gallon drum laid down end to end; it's an entirely different ball game lol.

This may also sound stupid, but I always think P.P.E.W. right before I go up. P is picture (sight picture), then Parallax, E is elevation, W is windage. This is probably because my fiancé never says shooting and always asks if I'm going to pewpew when I leave the house with gear lol.
 
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Rob01

Super Mod/Team Blaster
Staff member
Jul 9, 2001
9,514
443
83
NC
www.teamblaster.net
#6
Yup scope power is very important and something a lot of newer shooters have issues with. Leaving it on 25x is going to cause issues for sure. I usually start a stage where I am shooting off something at one or multiple targets on about 12x. Usually works well and I can adjust if needed. For parallax i usually set it where it's in mid area for the targets to be shot and don't touch it.

Another thing is the scope caps. Seen a lot of people go up and then have to open them on the clock.
 
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Dthomas3523

Blind Squirrel
Jan 31, 2018
1,887
701
113
South Texas
#7
Yup scope power is very important and something a lot of newer shooters have issues with. Leaving it on 25x is going to cause issues for sure. I usually start a stage where I am shooting off something at one or multiple targets on about 12x. Usually works well and I can adjust if needed. For parallax i usually set it where it's in mid area for the targets to be shot and don't touch it.

Another thing is the scope caps. Seen a lot of people go up and then have to open them on the clock.
I made the 24x mistake my first match. Left it all the way up the entire time. I had no issues finding targets, but as the mirage got worse, I started missing more.

Next match I set it around 15x (or whatever power cuts the mirage down best, unless I’m looking for wind) didn’t touch it and had much better success.
 
Feb 14, 2017
28
1
3
North Carolina
#8
Good ideas on the magnification. Set that bad boy around 15 power unless you shooting one static target from one position (KYL Plate rack for example).

My biggest improvements came from me getting off of my stomach and shooting from all kinds of different height barricades. Dry fire is super important. My thought on this is that if you sneak in a hit from a bad trigger pull, you won’t improve. It’s not nearly as fun, so live fire too of course.

I got a game changer bag that I used to hate using, and now it’s the only thing I use. Put it on railings, barricades of all heights, and measure your scope wobble while pulling the trigger dry firing. If it’s always on the target, you’re good. Just keep playing around with positions until you can get stable. The speed will come with practice, but get your hits in before you focus on speeding up.
 

Dthomas3523

Blind Squirrel
Jan 31, 2018
1,887
701
113
South Texas
#9
Lately I’ve been practicing with positional natural point of aim. I’m finding(no surprise here), it’s just about the most important aspect if your trigger pull is g2g.

One of the big pluses I’m seeing whilst practicing npoa is that you also get practice making the most stable position posssible to achieve correct npoa.

I would get frustrated while practing making positions and shooting when I was focused on making the actual position, if that makes sense. Now, I just focus on adjusting to the best npoa for me, stop when I have it and look how I’m set up. Then I start working on the fastest way to get into that position.