Eye fatigue while behind scope

lennyo3034

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I just swapped to a March F from a Nightforce F1. I like everything about the scope, except one issue that I noticed. After about 30 minutes of shooting, I notice sometimes my sight picture goes completely blurry. I know this is an issue with my eye, because I will look away from the scope, or close the eye and go back behind the scope to get a clear picture again. However it's annoying to have to do every few shots. Does anyone know what's going on? This did not happen with the Nightforce.

When I got the scope, I did not change the diopter since the reticle looked good. I have since adjusted it for my eye, although it ended up pretty close to where it was to begin with.
 

sinister

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It's normal. You may be getting eyestrain whether you are looking through irons or a scope.

Competition shooters will divert their gaze to the side at something closer (grass or data book) then go back to the scope. A competition string usually takes no longer than 30 minutes (unlimited sighters and 20 for score).

An angled spotting scope allows you to use your right eye in the rifle scope or irons while reading winds and spotting scores and impacts with the left.

Snipers should rotate off the gun every 30 minutes to prevent splitting headaches and eye strain.
 

g2gjoe

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Thank you for starting this thread, I've had the same problem sometimes. I would like to hear more answers also. Mostly when this happens I just take a little break. I have noticed that this happens more with my leupold than with my NF. I wonder if fatigue has anything to do with this. Sometimes turning on my illumination will buy me a couple extra minutes, but isn't always optimal when shooting for 100-300 yard groups. I don't know why this makes the target clearer for another minute or two, but it does help. Maybe because I'm putting less effort on the reticle, and a little more focus on the target.
I've also noticed if I haven't slept well, or been out drinking the whole night before, my focus lasts longer. But of coarse when I've tore it up the night before, my biggest problem is a not so steady hand, ie sometimes shakey. I've also wondered about caffeine before shooting, it does help my focus, but too much of that effects my steadiness also. Not bad for ringing plates, but I think it effects my small group paper punching efforts.
 

Ramius

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How old are you? When was the last time you went to an eye doc?

I've noticed I can't stay behind the rifle for as long a period as when I was in my 20's. You *can* train to prolong your ability to stay on the glass but we will all notice degradation of performance as we age.
 

lennyo3034

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In my 20s, just had lasik last year. 20/10 vision last time I went to eye doc a couple months ago.

In all fairness, I am sick as fuck right now and probably shouldn't be leaving the house, but I couldn't help it since I got a new optic. That may have something to do with it.
 

lennyo3034

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Drifter™;3128331 said:
Not sure if it matters, but curious if you are using the March at a higher magnification than you used with the NF F1...?

If so, what happens when you dial down the power?
Yes I am, was using 24X on the march vs 15 on the NF. As I recall, I also had the same issues when I had a SWFA 16x42. Do you think exit pupil has something to do with it?
 

Drifter™

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Yes I am, was using 24X on the march vs 15 on the NF. As I recall, I also had the same issues when I had a SWFA 16x42. Do you think exit pupil has something to do with it?
I was thinking more along the lines of magnification itself being a potential contributor to eye strain, but really don't know... Of course, I'm assuming comparable quality glass and appropriate focus / parallax adjustment.

Consider trying the new scope at slightly lower power and see how your eyes do.
 
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djskit

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I've never had this issue - I think a lot of guys do not property adjust their diopter. I find it difficult myself to get the reticle sharp with a completely relaxed eye - it takes some effort to get it right.

The eye really wants to focus on the reticle, so many don't even notice that when they look through a new scope, their eye has adjusted to focus the reticle - you really have to close your eye, let it relax and check the focus.

Same goes for parallax/image focus. I've found my self focusing on the image and then the reticle - a great recipie for eye strain.

I'd advise you start from scratch on the diopter - dial it was out (or in) and slowly bring it into focus. Look away or close your eye and check it several times.
 

lennyo3034

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I've never had this issue - I think a lot of guys do not property adjust their diopter. I find it difficult myself to get the reticle sharp with a completely relaxed eye - it takes some effort to get it right.

The eye really wants to focus on the reticle, so many don't even notice that when they look through a new scope, their eye has adjusted to focus the reticle - you really have to close your eye, let it relax and check the focus.

Same goes for parallax/image focus. I've found my self focusing on the image and then the reticle - a great recipie for eye strain.

I'd advise you start from scratch on the diopter - dial it was out (or in) and slowly bring it into focus. Look away or close your eye and check it several times.
I think you're right. I actually did that last night, but haven't been to the range yet.
 

Tristian19

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I myself have struggled with same in past. I have noticed it has gotten better without seeing a doctor. FYI: I do not shoot with prescriptions and I do have astigmatisms. I have noticed as of late I do have this issue if I do not get a decent amount of sleep night before range trip. I am head of IT for a corp, not that this means anything but, I work all hours of day and night. Also look at computer screens 24x7.

Some of what I have done differently over past few months.
- I take less shots each range trip BUT
- I take much more meaningful shots
- I take more time between shots
- I usually get up from prone position between shots forcing myself to go through ALL fundamentals for each shot
- If I do not get up I continue to lay on my rig, put my head down and relax my body before next shot
- I no longer pull trigger if
1. I feel ANY tension in my body (shoulders, arms et cetera)
2. Any strain on shooting eye
3. Shot is not worth taking
* No more IFy shots If you get what I am saying

Since above I have noticed I do not have issues unless lack of sleep night before. Then I would say, YES, I can and do experience what I believe I am reading in this thread with respect to eyes.

Also, I have noticed my groups shrink to .3 MOA and better with my 338 Lapua as I have been taking her out since she was delivered two months ago.

Lastly, I track each shot noting in my log book. I make notes on placement and every shot taken. Including but not limited to for each shot:
1. Correct follow through
2. Incorrect follow though
3. Shoulder push
4. incorrect shoulder placement
5. Incorrect cheek pressure (which I no longer apply cheek pressure)
6. Rushing shots
and anything else see

Just my two cents with what I do.

*** I second thanking for creating this thread as well ***
 

Tristian19

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I've never had this issue - I think a lot of guys do not property adjust their diopter. I find it difficult myself to get the reticle sharp with a completely relaxed eye - it takes some effort to get it right.

The eye really wants to focus on the reticle, so many don't even notice that when they look through a new scope, their eye has adjusted to focus the reticle - you really have to close your eye, let it relax and check the focus.

Same goes for parallax/image focus. I've found my self focusing on the image and then the reticle - a great recipie for eye strain.

I'd advise you start from scratch on the diopter - dial it was out (or in) and slowly bring it into focus. Look away or close your eye and check it several times.
A BIG +1

This was something I have neglected until just recently. I have to say it has also helped greatly as well.
 

Hunt

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This is pronounced when in a prairie dog field for a full day. Want to compare glass? Look through various glass when you're tired at the end of the day afield.
 

Tristian19

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On top of my previously mentioned recent changes above I did add two S&B PMII 5-25x56 to my new customs.

Sent from my SM-T217S using Tapatalk
 

SWRichmond

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other factors that I have learned effect my vision during a match:

1. alcohol consumption the day before nearly any amount at all is a negative factor

2. adequate rest

3. sufficient and deliberate hydration the day before the match and during the match especially on a hot day. if you're not peeing several times during the day you're not drinking enough.

4. spending too much time on the rifle trying to read mirage. I use my left eye in the spotting scope for scoring and to make mirage calls and then confirm mirage in the rifle scope to shoot and watch the target go down. glancing around gently in between shots. when the wind is changing constantly this is actually a lot of hard work and I get tired.

5. nutrition is a factor. eat quality and supplement where necessary.
 
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neiltus

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Lots of good advise here.

I shoot 2-3x a week, but rarely shoot using an optic. Rarely as in maybe once every month or so-few dozen shots over maybe an hour. Never for an extended time.

I took a class and after 5+ hours it got the best of me. I could see things going bad with eyes and concentration as the day progressed. End of the day, I was finished.

I don't see how guys can go sit on an optic for 10 hours.