Drones casing property/tresspassing- peeping drone

george5419

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Feb 24, 2014
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This needs to become a new form of fieldcraft both operating one and evading them .

i could use some input on a nusance drone.-

We have a rural property heavily treed and down a long gated drive.
Have been hearing a drone around the house and buildings. and have captured blured images of it on several surveilance cameras.
damm little things are fast and sneaky.... haven't got a good clear photo of it yet.
There are a few reports from neighbors also observing one- Peeping into windows both day and night.
Im not sure if it is a pervert- watching the ladies or a potential thief casing properties......either way we need to find out where and who the source is. to decide on the next coarse of action.

We need some ideas for removing/ identifying the threat ( besides shooting it down at this moment) detection, avoidance, and defense.
Such as a drone warning system,signal tracing, signal jamming, blocking , hijacking the drones signal , desired result is locating the operator and its ip address.
yes i'm looking into the various tech available, but any one with some practical experience?
most drones opperate on 2.4 mhz or 5.8mhz similar to ham radio and cell phone signal bands


Drones are becoming the new form of surveliance and we need to learn to understand and how to avoid/ minimize detection by them

any sugestions?
 
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lash

Swamp Rat
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Shotgun. #4 buckshot going up to anything good for a duck. Depends on the size of the drone.

There is also Mist netting, used to to catch birds for ornithological science. It's so fine the birds can't see it and they fly right into it. Once you have the drone you have a good chance of determining who is flying it, especially if you bring it to the local authorities.

There is also bird netting if you know where the drone is originating from, a road, a neighbor's place https://bird-x.com/bird-products/netting/ But netting of any kind can get pricey. Might find a deal on eBay or Amazon.

Personally, though, I like the shotgun idea.

I like the idea of the mist nets, but this gives me pause:
The purchase and use of mist nets requires permits, which vary according to a country or state's regulations.
This is probably wise, when you consider the number of wildlife types one could and would catch (and kill) in unattended nets of this type.

I do agree that the drone thing is a thing that has to be addressed.
 

sea2summit

Trying to get past 100m
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Shotgun. #4 buckshot going up to anything good for a duck. Depends on the size of the drone.

There is also Mist netting, used to to catch birds for ornithological science. It's so fine the birds can't see it and they fly right into it. Once you have the drone you have a good chance of determining who is flying it, especially if you bring it to the local authorities.

There is also bird netting if you know where the drone is originating from, a road, a neighbor's place https://bird-x.com/bird-products/netting/ But netting of any kind can get pricey. Might find a deal on eBay or Amazon.

Personally, though, I like the shotgun idea.

Drones are considered aircraft by the FAA, pretty sure if you shoot one down you’ll be in more trouble than the guy operating it inappropriately.
 

W54/XM-388

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I'd suggest you get into PM with Gunfighter and ask him to help you build & use a direction finding antenna setup to track down where the control signals are coming from. That's what you really want.

Disabling it with electronic means is another option but you may want to follow it home to see who is sending it.
 

HeavyAssault

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Guy down the block was doing this sort of thing. We knew who it was, called the Police...It was squashed.

I'd suggest some gathering of your own good quality evidence first. Report the situation(s) to all the right "authorities" . If they don't provide proper "relief", take care of the situation once and for all. If you are not a welcoming party to doing the right reporting....any actions you take could possibly be held against you.

For the video: Some heavy duty braid would have landed that thing easy.
 
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Alpine 338

Lumberjack
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If it were me, I would go out with my inexpensive little short range/short fly time drone... Oh too bad, we had a mid-air collision over my property. If the perp shows up looking for his drone, you call LE. If not, you have a bigger drone to play with.
 

THEIS

Hi, Sincerely
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Hi,

I know this is not going to "go over" well (no pun intended lol) but IF you knock, shoot, net, etc etc a drone down without massive documentation/evidence of it causing "substantial interference with the use and enjoyment of the property." YOU will be the one going to jail!!

"Substantial interference with the use and enjoyment of the property" is to be based off the following:
(b) The determination of whether an unmanned aircraft’s operation over property has caused substantial interference with the use and enjoyment of property shall be based upon a review of the totality of the circumstances, including:
(1) The amount of time the unmanned aircraft was operated over the landowner’s property;
(2) The altitude at which the unmanned aircraft was operating;
(3) The number of times unmanned aircraft have been operated over the property;
(4) Whether the unmanned aircraft recorded or captured audio, video or photographs while in operation over the property;
(5) Whether the landowner has regularly allowed operation of unmanned aircraft over the property;
(6) Whether the operation of the unmanned aircraft caused physical damage to persons or property;
(7) Whether the operation of the unmanned aircraft caused economic damage;
(8) The time of day the unmanned aircraft was operated over the landowner’s property;
(9) Whether an individual on the land saw or heard the unmanned aircraft while it was over the property; and,
(10) The operator’s purpose in operating the unmanned aircraft over the property.
(c) Repeated or continual operation of an unmanned aircraft over a landowner’s property shall not give rise to prescriptive rights in the airspace

Remember...Gas companies, electric companies, underground utility companies, tax assessors, etc etc are all using drones these days for task and they do not have to get your permission to check things out, so what you MIGHT think is some random "privacy" invasion could be gas company monitoring for leaks. Down that drone and be ready to liquidate your assets for legal fees.

And YES they do use them at night for certain tasks.

You can always go through the red tape and apply to the FAA for "Restricted or Special Use" Airspace.

Sincerely,
Theis
 
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george5419

Private
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Feb 24, 2014
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6
hills
Some interesting responses so far...
Yes it has been back ( dogs are wonderful spotters)

let me clarify

"----- ( besides shooting it down at this moment)" , that is currently not the best outcome
we NEED to ID the operator /location to procede accordingly.

yes a freq tracker /directional locator would be helpful if we see it in person
any experience with tracking or monitoring an in use drone ?
anyone with first hand knowledge of the tech in use?
 

WT1

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Regarding using a net. Put something out where the drone has been operating that the drone operator would find interesting, worth more investigation, like the bait in a fur-bearing animal trap, and put the nets around it or in the potential path of the drone so when the operator decides to fly the drone in for a closer look, it flies right into the net.

Just a thought.

Anything such as a freq tracking device or jammer is going to get pricey unless you can get a powerful radio and key it long enough on the correct freq.
 

W54/XM-388

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Anything such as a freq tracking device or jammer is going to get pricey unless you can get a powerful radio and key it long enough on the correct freq.
A frequency tracking device is actually pretty cheap if you make it yourself, basically it's a common skillset that amateur radio operators often practice with, go find where the transmitter is hidden..

If you happen to see the drone and more importantly have a good camera that can snap a picture of it, then your job is way easier as you can go online look up the model or manufacturer and have a pretty good idea what frequency range they use and the signal type so you can tune your foxhunt gear a bit better & go looking.

Now if it's one of the more advanced ones that actually runs off a Cellphone signal then it's a bit more work as you need to get something to spoof the tower handshake signal so you can get the device ids from it & then you'll have to be able to work from there which is a bit on the next level of playing the game (but still doable if you wish).

However in that case you could probably setup something to follow it back to who is controlling it, or tag it so you could track it. You might even have fun building your own mini racing drone and set it up to be able to lock onto a specific signal and follow it and then report back to you.
 

Gunfighter14e2

Rusty Nail
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Just search drone frequencies an everything you will need to know will pop up. The Jammer store can hook you up with all kinds of shelf items for shelf (public) toys. If your dealing with a three letter or better you will have to build your own, but used 18" dishes from Direct TV or Dish work perfect, if you can get a engineered gain antenna in the 2.4-6 Ghz range, Although some bogeyman shit is now in the 10-15 Ghz range with a -70db signal at max power. It's a brave new world, but remember if one asshole dreamed it up, another asshole can fuck it up.
Cheap is a reloaded 12-10 gage rd that uses lead fishing weights crimped onto 4-6 lb fishing line that spreads out quickly. A good drone fishing net like that can be made for less the a buck. Lastly if it's some kid or the local law expect a visit, if it's other than those nothing will happen, but jump on any numbers you find on it real quick, that will lead you to the MFG, an some mfgs do not sell to the public but there is away to find out who bought it direct,... Happy hunting, an remember what is yours only remains yours, if your willing to fight for it. Lots of misconceptions out there involving drones an uncle is not the only one, that likes to spy on you,...
 

Jefe's Dope

Duke Caboom
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As stated, shooting it down or otherwise will bring a world of shit down on you you wouldn't wish upon the drone pilot bothering you and your neighbors. You might as well shoot down a private plane as it's pretty much the same legal ramifications minus the murder.

Whoever claimed you must be over 500 feet to fly over property is wrong. Even referenced they knew this somehow through some sort of legal action. Fact of the matter is most drones are NOT allowed to fly over 400 feet. You can certainly fly over private property, planes do it every day, and the how low they can go is determined by the FAA NOT local law enforcement NOR the state law enforcement.

As mentioned, the FAA controls ALL airspace and rules for flying including drones. Google drone rules and you find about all you want to know. But, I bet you'll be pretty disappointed that you actually have very little to no teeth in stopping them from flying.

"Peeping" into windows is a completely different scenario and is very difficult to do w/ a commercially available drone. The cameras are good but not that good and just like a satellite in space, it can't see sideways w/o REALLY specialized camera equipment that's financially out of reach for just about anyone but large .govs.

Edit: .govs CAN limit where you fly from, i.e. city parks, etc. IF they own and control the property. They can NOT stop you from flying over city parks, etc. IF you are controlling from private property or legal flying locations. The ONLY rule that can stop you from flying over a city park, etc. is if there's a "group" of people. You can still fly over, just NOT the people. The FAA defines "group". Also, notice I reference rules when describing the FAA and flying. That's right, they're rules, not laws. There are laws that apply but most of this discussion will be around the 'rules'. Fixed wing hobby flyers have been dealing with these issues for years. Nothing new except how easy and well the modern drones fly by comparison.
 
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Gunfighter14e2

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using the color of made up law to keep invading people life's for the "good of the children" is going to invite major pus back one day. The gov or anyone does not get to have their way all the time. There are people who have drawn a line an have the ability when it gets stepped over. Those that think they are too strong an keep pushing will reap that they sow, when the time is right for the oppressed to become the oppressor, for If it's a fair fight, you did not plan it right. Used spectrum analyzers let alone, the latest an greatest are not cheap, but neither is freedom
 

Bullfrog08

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Dec 6, 2018
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Follow it home and then go have a talk with the person. If you keep it civil, they will likely stop. I'm sure if you get close to the location and then ask neighbors, they can point you to the home with the drone. It's likely some kid and they just don't realize it is annoying you.
 
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WT1

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You know a law that is written to protect the drone abuser over the person whose privacy is being invaded isn't a just law. It may not even be a law, it could simply be a regulation produced by a large bureaucracy.

As long as your are not hurting anyone, a shotgun or the netting system seems like a good solution to me. Shoot it down if it is continually hovering over your property and then see what happens. Take a stun gun to the wreckage and make sure there isn't any data left retrievable on it. Make a big thing about it on social media if it becomes problematic. All these powder puffs that are screaming bloody murder if you shoot down a drone invading your privacy, well you don't want them on your side anyway.

If it is a commercial drone, you know, the ones they are testing to deliver packages, well that is a different story. But even they need to have some sort of image collection control so as not to be taking pictures in windows and so forth.

That's all I'm saying.
 
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Jefe's Dope

Duke Caboom
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Nobody gives a shit if he shoots it down. Just letting anyone know what's gonna happen if you do. But please post a link here to your "social media" video of you shooting down a drone. That's a spectacular idea which will likely provide several years of entertainment to this thread.
 

Jefe's Dope

Duke Caboom
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And just to stir the pot.

They're actually a quadcopter NOT a drone.

Drone:

MILITARY-DRONE.jpeg




Quadcopter:

6194019_SD.jpeg






 

lash

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And just to stir the pot.

They're actually a quadcopter NOT a drone.

Drone:

View attachment 7161590




Quadcopter:

View attachment 7161592






So, from your own link, they ARE actually drones. Drone being a general category of unmanned flying vehicles and quadcopter being a specific sub-category of drones.

“Drone” is a broad term used to describe any kind of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). As such, it can be used to describe both UAVs that are remotely controlled and those that are controlled by onboard computers. These types of aerial craft can look either like a small airplane or like a helicopter. They generally have two characteristics that set them apart as drones: They are engine-controlled, and they can fly for long periods of time.
“Quadcopter” is a more specific term used to refer to a drone that is controlled by four rotors. It is also called a quadrotor or a quadrotor helicopter. The rotors on the quadcopter each consist of a motor and a propeller. In addition, these UAVs are always controlled remotely instead of being controlled by a pre-programmed, onboard computer. Quadcopters resemble helicopters, but balance themselves by the movement of the blades and not by the use of a tail rotor.
In view of these definitions, it is accurate to think of drones as a broad category and quadcopters as a specific type of drone within that category. There are many other types of UAVs (such as tricopters, hexacopters, and octocopters) that also fit the general description of a drone. A drone can only be considered a quadcopter, however, if it has four rotors.
 

TheGerman

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Dig trench

Put material over it to make it a dugout

Place something crazy nearby that anyone with a drone would want to come and look it; blow up doll, something. Do this in an area that bottlenecks down a bit in the airspace and they need to bring the drone down to less than 10 feet to really get a look at

Either come out of the dugout with a net or have a falling net rigged

Enjoy free drone
 

forrestgump01

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As stated, shooting it down or otherwise will bring a world of shit down on you you wouldn't wish upon the drone pilot bothering you and your neighbors. You might as well shoot down a private plane as it's pretty much the same legal ramifications minus the murder.

Whoever claimed you must be over 500 feet to fly over property is wrong. Even referenced they knew this somehow through some sort of legal action. Fact of the matter is most drones are NOT allowed to fly over 400 feet. You can certainly fly over private property, planes do it every day, and the how low they can go is determined by the FAA NOT local law enforcement NOR the state law enforcement.

As mentioned, the FAA controls ALL airspace and rules for flying including drones. Google drone rules and you find about all you want to know. But, I bet you'll be pretty disappointed that you actually have very little to no teeth in stopping them from flying.
I'm not the one who has it backwards and wrong, and yes I have had someone charged and convicted of trespassing with a drone. he was given a warning by the police chief the first time but was too stupid to listen. what I stated earlier is a fact. If you want to fly your drone over 400 ft then it has to be registered with ffa and follow all there regs.
The ffa ruled a long time ago that all private property owners own the airspace over there property up to 500 ft. there is a 500ft ceiling for helicopters and 400 ft ceiling for airplanes. So if your flying around and HARASSING someone with your drone over there property and less than 400 ft then you ARE trespassing.
Believe what you want and if you don't then bring your drone to my property and see how fast I have the local law enforcement serving you a warrant.
Now i will emphasize the fact that doing a simple fly over at 300 ft verses hovering around (harassing) at 20 ft around buildings , is two TOTALLY DIFFERENT different things.
And yes when you go to court you are going to need a hell of lot of documentation (not arguinging that).
Yes your right you cant just shoot down a plane with people in it , but at the same time someone can't just show up with a helicopter at your property hovering around at 100ft.
 
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forrestgump01

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as far as shooting one down , the question is.........was the drone acting in threatening manner , coming toward you .
"I had no choice officer , I was in fear of bodily harm to myself and my property. "
 

WT1

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Shooting one down suggests it is close enough for you to hit with a good cloud from a shotgun to begin with and if it is that close, it is within the definition of an invasion of privacy or airspace as others have mentioned (under 500 feet). Net it or shoot it down. I don't think there is any other real debate. If it over 500 feet, then you are SOL unless you have a way to jam its control frequency.
 

Jefe's Dope

Duke Caboom
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I'm not the one who has it backwards and wrong, and yes I have had someone charged and convicted of trespassing with a drone. he was given a warning by the police chief the first time but was too stupid to listen. what I stated earlier is a fact. If you want to fly your drone over 400 ft then it has to be registered with ffa and follow all there regs.
The ffa ruled a long time ago that all private property owners own the airspace over there property up to 500 ft. there is a 500ft ceiling for helicopters and 400 ft ceiling for airplanes. So if your flying around and HARASSING someone with your drone over there property and less than 400 ft then you ARE trespassing.
Believe what you want and if you don't then bring your drone to my property and see how fast I have the local law enforcement serving you a warrant.
Now i will emphasize the fact that doing a simple fly over at 300 ft verses hovering around (harassing) at 20 ft around buildings , is two TOTALLY DIFFERENT different things.
And yes when you go to court you are going to need a hell of lot of documentation (not arguinging that).
Yes your right you cant just shoot down a plane with people in it , but at the same time someone can't just show up with a helicopter at your property hovering around at 100ft.
Your English teacher must of sucked or gone mad.:geek:


  1. Fly your drone at or below 400 feet when in uncontrolled or "Class G" airspace. This is airspace where the FAA is not controlling manned air traffic. To determine what type of airspace you are in, refer to the mobile application that operates your drone (if so equipped) and/or use other drone-related mobile applications. Knowing your location and what airspace you're in will also help you avoid interfering with other aircraft.

Can my neighbor fly a drone over my property?

Yes, it is legal to overfly a neighbor's, or a stranger's, property if it's not in an otherwise restricted area. The airspace over a property is an easement and the FAA allows planes and helicopters to fly over it, generally above 500′ for piloted aircraft, up to 400′ for drones.
 
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Jefe's Dope

Duke Caboom
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I'm not the one who has it backwards and wrong, and yes I have had someone charged and convicted of trespassing with a drone. he was given a warning by the police chief the first time but was too stupid to listen. what I stated earlier is a fact. If you want to fly your drone over 400 ft then it has to be registered with ffa and follow all there regs.
The ffa ruled a long time ago that all private property owners own the airspace over there property up to 500 ft. there is a 500ft ceiling for helicopters and 400 ft ceiling for airplanes. So if your flying around and HARASSING someone with your drone over there property and less than 400 ft then you ARE trespassing.
Believe what you want and if you don't then bring your drone to my property and see how fast I have the local law enforcement serving you a warrant.
Now i will emphasize the fact that doing a simple fly over at 300 ft verses hovering around (harassing) at 20 ft around buildings , is two TOTALLY DIFFERENT different things.
And yes when you go to court you are going to need a hell of lot of documentation (not arguinging that).
Yes your right you cant just shoot down a plane with people in it , but at the same time someone can't just show up with a helicopter at your property hovering around at 100ft.
Your English teacher must of sucked or gone mad.:geek:


  1. Fly your drone at or below 400 feet when in uncontrolled or "Class G" airspace. This is airspace where the FAA is not controlling manned air traffic. To determine what type of airspace you are in, refer to the mobile application that operates your drone (if so equipped) and/or use other drone-related mobile applications. Knowing your location and what airspace you're in will also help you avoid interfering with other aircraft.

Can my neighbor fly a drone over my property?

Yes, it is legal to overfly a neighbor's, or a stranger's, property if it's not in an otherwise restricted area. The airspace over a property is an easement and the FAA allows planes and helicopters to fly over it, generally above 500′ for piloted aircraft, up to 400′ for drones.

Now who do I believe? The official FAA site citing rules or some random person on the internet who claims otherwise? Unless the airspace over your house is "restricted air space" and you didn't bother to mention it.

I'm not defending an idiot w/ a drone. I'm only bringing facts to the thread. I'm still down with you videoing yourself shooting one done though. Post it here and on social media too. :geek:
 
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forrestgump01

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Your English teacher must of sucked or gone mad.:geek:


  1. Fly your drone at or below 400 feet when in uncontrolled or "Class G" airspace. This is airspace where the FAA is not controlling manned air traffic. To determine what type of airspace you are in, refer to the mobile application that operates your drone (if so equipped) and/or use other drone-related mobile applications. Knowing your location and what airspace you're in will also help you avoid interfering with other aircraft.

Can my neighbor fly a drone over my property?

Yes, it is legal to overfly a neighbor's, or a stranger's, property if it's not in an otherwise restricted area. The airspace over a property is an easement and the FAA allows planes and helicopters to fly over it, generally above 500′ for piloted aircraft, up to 400′ for drones.
ya my English teacher sucked , but probably hasn't sucked near as many as you have.
Like I said believe what you want , I don't need to argue, as I have had first hand experience with what someone can and can't do with a drone on your property . I will leave you with an open invitation to bring a drone to my neck of the woods and fly around on private property out here . it's a very small town and our law enforcement is extremely board out of there mind and would love to spend some time with you !
 

regency

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1. the camera on the drone is not going to be able to see into windows
2. the drone can not fly low altitude very far away from the one piloting it because trees, houses, hills block signal, if I want to fly it into someones back yard, I better have a direct line of sight or I'll lose reception
3. most drones have data logging, if you shoot it down the drone owner will have all the evidence he needs
4. shooting down a drone is a federal crime

my advice would be to not pay it any attention
 
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Downtown

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I think what's being confused here is the difference between over flying someone's property and low level harrassment. A good case can be made for many different types of harrassment, even from public property.
 
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W54/XM-388

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Texas surprisingly has some rather overly strict laws regarding bothering folks with drones and improper photography with drones.
 
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WT1

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Create a drone trap, just like an animal trap. Put out a sign on the road that says "Nudist colony meeting tomorrow night at 6pm." Then you will probably lure in all of the drones in the entire county. Invite friends over and tell them to bring shotguns and all the shells they have. When the drones start showing up, it's party time! (y)
 
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