DIY powder storage

Rangemaster

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I built this for less then thirty dollars and it is lined with 1/2” hardy back and has doors on both sides with two layers of hardy back in the middle. All the wood was from jobsite pickup, only things I bought as the hidges, caster wheels and hardy back board.
 

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Strykervet

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I was using a Stack-On locker until I filled it with ammo, now it's all in the closet. I'd like another stack on though and plan to go back to doing it that way. The actual listed lockers for this stuff aren't much different.
 

Jackomason

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When I worked at cabelas in highschool back in Canada, I seem to remember that the feds didn't want them storing powder in a metal cabinet. The idea is that wood doesnt build pressure like metal does.. anyway all this to say that this is a great idea!
 

Eric_F

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Looks really nice! Lots of reloaders don't think a flammable cabinet is needed at all, but after years in chemistry labs it just feels wrong to me. There are some YouTube videos demonstrating wood flammable cabinets perform impressively. So I found these plans, and built a couple versions. http://finishing.tips/wooden-flammable-storage-cabinets/

A 1“ nominal thick wall wood cabinet is actually required by NFPA for >20 lbs powder. Not sure for who/when that would apply, but it makes me feel better.

First I built a mini version for primers, just cheap poplar though. Latch is only as a pull, it only seals from spring pressure on the hinge. Then I built a larger version for powder, from solid red oak. I don't have my plans handy, but it's the depth of a 12" nominal board and 16" tall, I think about 18" wide.
 

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Sean the Nailer

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The thing is, just to cloud the discussion,,,, is the focus on "storage in case of fire" OR "storage in case of burglary/theft?"

Those would be two totally different parameters, no? So how does one prevent access AND fire, efficiently?
 

Eric_F

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The thing is, just to cloud the discussion,,,, is the focus on "storage in case of fire" OR "storage in case of burglary/theft?"

Those would be two totally different parameters, no? So how does one prevent access AND fire, efficiently?
Who are you concerned about stealing your gunpowder? I would only worry about my kids, and I just have the powder cabinets on high shelves and a (normal) lock on the door for that.
 
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woogie_man

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Now that is impressive!! Just noticed the left side of the picture under the table....with all the turrets loaded up.

Very nice
 

Eric_F

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That's quite the effective demo, especially since you can tell that vividly all these years later.

I'm conscious of not wanting to build up pressure (also since I was in Boston for the marathon attack, that's always what it reminds me of) so neither of my cabinets above have latches, it's just the hinge spring pressure holding the door shut. They wouldn't be effective at stopping burning for long, but it could slow a small fire and it's definitely better than nothing.
 

Sean the Nailer

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Excellent write-up Greg, and Thank You for that. I truly didn't know that the typical 'ammo can' was designed to burst as such. That really puts a different lite on my own view of personal ammunition storage.

My whole life growing up, my father was a fireman. We all know that firemen (firepeople?) die at work fighting fires every year. The last thing I want to do is create a scenario where there is further endangerment. The conflict that I also have, is 'petty theft' and B&E's happen a LOT more now than they did 20-30 years ago. Add to that the cost of powder AS WELL AS the limited availability of it (too often) and that stuff is precious. So access prevention is paramount, too.

It's a balancing act. As far as I'm concerned, electrified razor-wire and minefields are your friend. (I hate thieves).

But yeah, the 'bursting' ammo can really helps with the ammo storage conundrum. Cool.

It ain't so easy being a 'responsible' adult, is it?
 

Eric_F

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A great friend, now long deceased, was quite the handloader. His basement had a concrete block enclosure in the corner 's what prompted me to look into safe storage, codes, etc., surrounding ammunition fabrication. While they may vary in small part with locale, they all usually follow nationally recognized standards, and all (once the details are understood) make excellent sense.
Okay, you prompted me to look up my state code. Nothing local I found, but MN state code matches the NFPA code for personal use. I'm guessing that if you had a house fire, your home insurance could come back and say you were breaking state law which contributed to the fire and refuse to pay?
 

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Rangemaster

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Okay, you prompted me to look up my state code. Nothing local I found, but MN state code matches the NFPA code for personal use. I'm guessing that if you had a house fire, your home insurance could come back and say you were breaking state law which contributed to the fire and refuse to pay?
That is why I made a wooden box. Its setup on rollers or wheels to quickly be moved.
 

Greg Langelius *

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Guess all you want.

Posts deleted. Anyone looking for advice on storing powder and ammo won't be reading about it from me, ever again.

Brought this up once before, and the trolls came out to prove how much wiser they are than I.

Wood's legal, OK. Consider the wisdom of encasing flammable goods within a flammable box.

Your choice.

Greg
 
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Greg Langelius *

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Back on topic, That really is a very impressive shop; I only wish I could do the deed that extensively.

My bench and such was already a medium blue when I arrived and mounted up the old Dillon RL550b.

But the shop area got a bunch of stuff moved in, and about half of it is still in the moving boxes (I have two avocations, the guns, and stick & tissue rubber powered free flight model aircraft). The model aircraft stuff is what's still in the boxes.

The model stuff was going to go into the spare bedroom - AKA my Day Room.

Then the rest of the family began moving in. Now, we have three times as many folks living here, and it's been a scramble, and not to mention, very expensive. Several are finding residences elsewhere, but I'll still have all the bedrooms occupied when that's all over and done with.

I may not live long enough to actually get that Day Room back...

Family...

Greg
 

Rlandry

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Good idea for powder storage if you are concerned about explosions. All of my powder and primers are stored on shelves in a wal-in closet in the room that triples as reloading, office, and junk storage. I won't say how much I have, just that I won't be inviting the Fire Marshall over for pie and coffee. LOL
 

CATM15

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Do you have some kind of system in place to combat moisture? I have my “cave” in the basement and it’s like a sauna down there in the summer time.
 

Geno C.

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Do you have some kind of system in place to combat moisture? I have my “cave” in the basement and it’s like a sauna down there in the summer time.
Close off the powder/gun area and run a dehumidifier
 

CATM15

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Close off the powder/gun area and run a dehumidifier
Yeah I’ll be getting a dehumidifier soon. The problem is all the water pipes for my unit run through the ceiling of my basement and create a ton of moisture so idk how effective it will be
 

Geno C.

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Insulating the pipes will cut down on the water that condenses on them. Running the humidity level down helps stop them from sweating too
 
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Sean the Nailer

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Insulating the pipes will cut down on the water that condenses on them. Running the humidity level down helps stop them from sweating too
This is very true. The less moisture in the air, the less will condensate on the cold water pipe. No need to insulate the hot water pipes, really.

Walling in the area and 'dehumidifying' it is the key. That's how we roll here. We have 1 dehumidifier IN the room, and another OUTSIDE the room. Just to ensure balance, redundancy, and peace-of-mind.