Dissapointed in Lapua brass.

vigildom7

New Hide Member
May 15, 2018
51
16
8
Albuquerque, New Mexico
#1
So I bought my first 200 peices of lapua 6.5cm brass after understanding it's the king of brass. Well the first box about 1/4 had lots of burs in the flasholes.
And the 2nd box almost half had a lot rough burs in the flash holes. After paying more than a dollar a peice I would think the QC or overall quality would be better.
Did I get a bad lot or? Should I contact lapua?
 

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BLKWLFK9

come at me bro
Feb 13, 2017
492
172
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#2
That is very unlike lapua. I would contact either the place you bought them from or lapua directly. You will get replacements and i bet the new ones wont look like that.
 

whatsupdoc

Duck season
Dec 12, 2017
357
198
43
Long Island NY
#3
I have been running two different lots of 6.5 Lapua brass and the holes are good, possible you got a bad batch.
With that being said I am no Lapua fanboy but my one lot has been fired 16 times and has only needed trimming twice.

I would contact them and see what they have to say, they may not know.
 

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
4,809
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#4
I’d just deburr those flash holes and run it, but that is not characteristic of the brand. Drilling is supposed to prevent that but who knows. I’d call them up and maybe they’ll give you some brass
 

Strykervet

Resident Phoenix Eye and Dim Mak Instructor
Jun 5, 2011
2,961
1,118
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42
Pierce County, WA
#6
I got 2000 pieces .308 and all where shit tight. I did get a few out of the first 1000 that had some kind of flawed case mouth that wouldn't just iron out and I sent them a picture and they went ahead and figured how many I'd need if all 2000 were like that, doubled it, and sent me that.

Quality mfg.'s stand behind their stuff IME. They're no different.
 

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
4,809
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#7
Lapua doesn’t drill, they punch according to their rep
Really?? I read for years they drilled and that’s why the flash holes never have shards in them.

Edit- just went to another forum and apparently it is a misconception that they are drilled, and I wasn’t the only one who thought so. They are indeed punched, but they still rarely need to be deburred. It’s not a very painstaking step to deburr them at all
 
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Xander3Zero

Just a normal dude.
Aug 10, 2017
480
142
43
Rhode Island
#8
Just contact them, they will get you sorted out.

I had a single defective piece in a box of 223 recently; it had a huge gouge up the side of the case that was clearly caused by an issue during manufacturing. They promptly sent me about 10 new cases, some sticks, a hat, and a t-shirt. They were also adamant about learning what lot # the defect was in so that they could track it down for their QC, which shows that they care about this stuff.
 

vigildom7

New Hide Member
May 15, 2018
51
16
8
Albuquerque, New Mexico
#11
So this is the response I got.

Dominic,
This is not uncommon for any manufacturers brass. Cartridge case preparation should be done anytime you buy new brass. Flash hole reaming , primer pocket uniforming , case neck sizing ETC. Need to be done before any loading of the cartridge case is started. The trick is getting the proper tools. For flash hole deburring for the .060 flash hole of our 6.5 CREEDMOOR cartridge cases or for any cartridge case with that size flash hole. I suggest you use the SINCLAIR INTERNATIONAL FLASH HOLE REAMING TOOL # 749-005-418. For primer pocket uniforming ( small rifle) get the 749-003-709 small rifle/pistol carbide primer pocket uniformer and either the 749-001-607 handle or 749-001-880 power screwdriver adaptor ( I suggest this one). These tools will help remove the burrs , properly size the flash hole so your decapping pin in your die does not stick and uniform the primer pocket depth for more consistant ignition (this should be done with each reloading of the cartridge case. Flash hole deburring just needs done one time) Another great source for quality reloading tools is PMA TOOL on the web! Hope this helps Dominic. If you have any more questions please feel free to contact us at any time!

Take care,
 
Likes: Culpeper

Max

Descendant of John Adams
#13
So this is the response I got.

Dominic,
This is not uncommon for any manufacturers brass. Cartridge case preparation should be done anytime you buy new brass. Flash hole reaming , primer pocket uniforming , case neck sizing ETC. Need to be done before any loading of the cartridge case is started. The trick is getting the proper tools. For flash hole deburring for the .060 flash hole of our 6.5 CREEDMOOR cartridge cases or for any cartridge case with that size flash hole. I suggest you use the SINCLAIR INTERNATIONAL FLASH HOLE REAMING TOOL # 749-005-418. For primer pocket uniforming ( small rifle) get the 749-003-709 small rifle/pistol carbide primer pocket uniformer and either the 749-001-607 handle or 749-001-880 power screwdriver adaptor ( I suggest this one). These tools will help remove the burrs , properly size the flash hole so your decapping pin in your die does not stick and uniform the primer pocket depth for more consistant ignition (this should be done with each reloading of the cartridge case. Flash hole deburring just needs done one time) Another great source for quality reloading tools is PMA TOOL on the web! Hope this helps Dominic. If you have any more questions please feel free to contact us at any time!

Take care,
That was from Lapua?
 

Max

Descendant of John Adams
#15
Not the response I would have expected. I thought their brass was a little higher on the totem pole. They charge enough. My Nosler brass is prepped and weight sorted."Flash holes are deburred and checked for proper alignment" https://www.nosler.com/brass/ . I use that in my 30-06 hunting rifle and I'm very happy with it. The last batch of .308 Lapua Brass I bought, the pockets opened very fast. Again disapointing for the money.
 
Likes: 1J04
Feb 13, 2017
3,496
3,593
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Camano Island, Washington
#17
I prep all my brass, including Lapua (which is all I use). Stop and consider how much time you spend prepping yours. No manufacturer can afford to do the same thing for free. If they did offer it as an option, the brass would cost at least 3 times as much. Simple economics.
 

Max

Descendant of John Adams
#18
I prep all my brass, including Lapua (which is all I use). Stop and consider how much time you spend prepping yours. No manufacturer can afford to do the same thing for free. If they did offer it as an option, the brass would cost at least 3 times as much. Simple economics.
Nosler is more but not 3X....."Flash holes are deburred and checked for proper alignment" https://www.nosler.com/brass/ .
 

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
4,809
1,982
113
#19
Nosler is still imperfect. I had to ream the primer pockets on an entire box of 300 WM because the primers were sitting too high
 

Max

Descendant of John Adams
#20
Nosler is still imperfect. I had to ream the primer pockets on an entire box of 300 WM because the primers were sitting too high
Did you contact them? They certainly advertise their product as ready to go. I have had great luck with Nosler in my 30-06. It actually has surpised me how long it lasts in that rifle compared to my 308 Lapua brass.
 

mijp5

Gunny Sergeant
May 7, 2009
4,809
1,982
113
#21
Did you contact them? They certainly advertise their product as ready to go. I have had great luck with Nosler in my 30-06. It actually has surpised me how long it lasts in that rifle compared to my 308 Lapua brass.
I didn’t bother because it wasn’t hard to fix. At the time, there were almost no choices for good 300 wm brass readily available
 
Likes: Max
May 12, 2006
793
113
43
The Big Country
#22
So this is the response I got.

Dominic,
This is not uncommon for any manufacturers brass. Cartridge case preparation should be done anytime you buy new brass. Flash hole reaming , primer pocket uniforming , case neck sizing ETC. Need to be done before any loading of the cartridge case is started. The trick is getting the proper tools. For flash hole deburring for the .060 flash hole of our 6.5 CREEDMOOR cartridge cases or for any cartridge case with that size flash hole. I suggest you use the SINCLAIR INTERNATIONAL FLASH HOLE REAMING TOOL # 749-005-418. For primer pocket uniforming ( small rifle) get the 749-003-709 small rifle/pistol carbide primer pocket uniformer and either the 749-001-607 handle or 749-001-880 power screwdriver adaptor ( I suggest this one). These tools will help remove the burrs , properly size the flash hole so your decapping pin in your die does not stick and uniform the primer pocket depth for more consistant ignition (this should be done with each reloading of the cartridge case. Flash hole deburring just needs done one time) Another great source for quality reloading tools is PMA TOOL on the web! Hope this helps Dominic. If you have any more questions please feel free to contact us at any time!

Take care,
I’m very disappointed in that response and I’m not even the one with the faulty brass. Guess when it’s time to replace my Hornady brass I’ll give Alpha a try.

John
 

Jammer Six

New Hide Member
Nov 5, 2018
23
6
3
Seattle
#26
I don't trust any manufacturer of any component.

It's my face, the chamber will be right next to it, and I inspect every component from every manufacturer before loading. Then I either correct anything that needs it or jettison the components; it's such an embedded part of my reloading that I don't even notice which brand sent me which defect anymore. They've all made mistakes, they've all sent me something that wasn't perfect.

I would say better to buy factory ammunition than rely on a component manufacturer to be perfect.

On another note, I don't buy components based on their reputation, I buy components based on reloading manuals. When I start loading for a new bullet (which is always the first component I pick) I match the rest of the brands to the recipe in the reloading manual.
 

Xander3Zero

Just a normal dude.
Aug 10, 2017
480
142
43
Rhode Island
#28
I don't trust any manufacturer of any component.

It's my face, the chamber will be right next to it, and I inspect every component from every manufacturer before loading. Then I either correct anything that needs it or jettison the components; it's such an embedded part of my reloading that I don't even notice which brand sent me which defect anymore. They've all made mistakes, they've all sent me something that wasn't perfect.

I would say better to buy factory ammunition than rely on a component manufacturer to be perfect.

On another note, I don't buy components based on their reputation, I buy components based on reloading manuals. When I start loading for a new bullet (which is always the first component I pick) I match the rest of the brands to the recipe in the reloading manual.
Dude the OP got some brass with "less-than-perfect" flash holes. Yes, many of us are surprised because we all use Lapua brass and normally the flash holes look pristine, but this is not something that could be considered any type of safety concern. Let's not blow this out of proportion...

OP, that is definitely not typical of Lapua brass. You may be able to return the box of brass to the distributor that you bought it from if you are unhappy with it. If not, I would suggest two options.

First option, you can just go through the extra step of deburring the flash holes (which you only have to do once for the life of the brass) and then load it up and enjoy. Second option would be to not even worry about deburring the flash holes, and just load it and shoot it anyways. Flash hole deburring is certainly not necessary to produce accurate and consistent ammo.

Despite the flash holes looking a little less than perfect in your batch, Lapua brass is still one of the most consistent brass you can buy and it will serve you well.
 

Jammer Six

New Hide Member
Nov 5, 2018
23
6
3
Seattle
#29
"Dude", I didn't say it was a safety concern. I said because of safety, I don't trust any manufacturers, and none of them deliver perfect products.

We actually agree-- it was a mistake, and as mistakes go, it was a pretty small one.

I would say don't blow Lapua's reputation out of proportion. None of them are run by gods.
 
Likes: Max
Jul 29, 2014
1,049
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#30
"Dude", I didn't say it was a safety concern. I said because of safety, I don't trust any manufacturers, and none of them deliver perfect products.

We actually agree-- it was a mistake, and as mistakes go, it was a pretty small one.

I would say don't blow Lapua's reputation out of proportion. None of them are run by gods.
so trust factory ammo to be perfect before individual components?

also, reloading manuals? you're kidding right?
 
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JSTARSZ

Lefty's Rule
Feb 6, 2008
2,081
124
63
Wolftown
#33
By cat you mean female friend?
You beat me to it. It hit my brain and then I read the next input and thought -ah, beat me to it.

The brass I have come to love is Norma brass. I have been buying the 130 Gr Norma loads and using the brass. The ammo is super accurate and it leaves me with awesome brass.
 
Likes: Max

spife7980

Full Member
Feb 10, 2017
4,104
1,037
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Central TX
#35
Did I read somewhere that Norma makes Nosler or vice versa? That basically they are the same brass?
I think that they did but then nosler acquired silver state armory and I think they do it all there now? Might still outsource some, not sure. Thats just the latest Ive heard and Im sure is in some part wrong given that its the internet lol
 
Likes: Max

MarinePMI

Battery Operated Grunt
Jun 3, 2010
2,775
1,212
113
San Diego, Ca
#36
Norma (in the past) definitely made the Nosler brass (I have photos of the brass shipping drums from Norma on the Nosler loading dock). Today? Not sure, as it's been awhile since Nosler started selling their own headstamped brass.
 
Likes: Max