CZ 455 pillar bedding questions

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#1
So I decided to pillar bed my CZ 455 Varmint with Thumbhole stock to improve accuracy as much as possible. I wanna use devcon steel for gluing in the pillars and "glas" bedding the action. I found the action can move 2-3mm front to rear. Rifle is in .17 HMR and im getting like 1 MOA groups which is not acceptable for me. So I'm not quite sure what to use for the pillars yet. First option is lamprod M10 thread or aluminium tubing with 1mm wall thinkness. So the problem is the action screw holes are like half open as you can see in the picture. I'm affraid I may ruin the stock because I don't got a drillpress that drills really straigt holes. Will the 1mm aluminium tubing be sturdy enought to withstand the force from tightening the action screws? That way I could just use some sand paper to open up the hole in the stock because the outer diameter of the tube ist just 8mm and the action screw hole is 7mm. Any help would be apreciated. Thanks guys!

 

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heartburn

New Hide Member
Feb 16, 2018
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#2
PM Don

I know he is retired but he may be able to source some pillars and give you some suggestions on how to approach the 455 pillar/bedding. His SH username
djdilliodon
 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#5
Thanks! But there is no way to get them to europe. But I know someone that could make some for me on a lathe if really needed. As already said I'm affraid to drill such a big hole in the stock
 

Tucker301

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Feb 13, 2015
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#6
Yeah, I missed the part about you being in Europe.
A Forstner bit will give you the cleanest hole in wood.
I believe many a pillar has been fashioned from lamp rod.
 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#7
Was also thinking about using a forstner bit if I really have to drill. If I use a normal metal drill it might help center itself a little but it wanders out of the hole I think.
 
Dec 17, 2013
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West Babylon, NY
#8
33/64” piloted counterbore, make sure the spacing is correct, and drill it. Be sure to face the pillars off at the proper angle as the guard inletting to prevent aftermarket guards that are solid from bowing. Do it right or don’t do it at all!
 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#10
33/64” piloted counterbore, make sure the spacing is correct, and drill it. Be sure to face the pillars off at the proper angle as the guard inletting to prevent aftermarket guards that are solid from bowing. Do it right or don’t do it at all!
I won't use a aftermarket guard so does it really matter? I would just make it flush with the wood. Getting such a counterbore in that size will not be easy here. Maybe a forstner bit and some lamprod will also do? I might can also get steel tubing in the same dimentions as the aluminium tubing. The guy in that thread linked below used steel tubing with even less was thickness however this seems really thin.

@want2learn

I saw this post but I need to enlarge the holes anyways the tube he is using is almost 8mm outer diameter the holes only got 7mm.
 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#14
It should but its way more sensitive from the sides than steel. I really see no point in using carbon tubing. Weight savings also don't matter. Steel or aluminium is also more shock resistent I think. But still interesting idea.
 

Nodakplowboy

Online Training Member
Mar 4, 2017
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#15
Was also thinking about using a forstner bit if I really have to drill. If I use a normal metal drill it might help center itself a little but it wanders out of the hole I think.
If you have a drill index and a drill with a good chuck, you can drill out the stock holes 1/16" at a time until you reach the proper diameter. Support the stock well, drill from the bottom, use slow rpm's. Each time you move up in bit size, slowly run the drill in reverse for a few turns. This will bevel the hole a bit and help prevent material tear out. Go slow and let the bit self center, very mild down pressure. On the final pass, increase rpm's and make a couple of passes, this will clean up the hole.

Sharp clean bits are a given.
 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#16
I will buy the drills I need new so they are sharp. I got a cheap drillstand and a cheap electric drill. So you sugest I just use normal HSS metal drills?
 

Nodakplowboy

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Mar 4, 2017
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#17
Any good quality set of bits with a 118 degree cutting angle should work. I'd suggest you not use the drillstand, the bit will self center if you go slow and let it follow it's own path. Some practice on scrap would give the feel of it.

In regards to your drill. it's the chuck that's important. Chuck up a bit and spin it at different speeds watching the tip of the bit. If it wobbles at all, stop. Buy, beg or borrow better equipment. If you stay with the DIY path, a good drill and bits will be used a lot. Good equipment pays for itself many times over rather then junk that just gets one in trouble.
 
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brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#18
Yeah the drillbit wobbles around thats not good... But if I buy or borrow a good handdrill will the bit not just slip out the side of the hole?
 

Nodakplowboy

Online Training Member
Mar 4, 2017
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#19
Good point. You can:
1). Front hole, try slowly spinning bits by hand
2). Use a round wood rasp on both front and rear, go slow and check size often
3). Take your chances with gear on hand
4). Take to somebody who is properly set up with a mill and knows how to use it.

I've done all of the above with varying degrees of success. Finally bought a good heavy duty drill press, life got better.

I'm out of ideas, maybe someone else has more thoughts on the matter.
 
Apr 21, 2012
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#20
It ain't hard to accomplish.
I used 1/4 inch inside diameter brass nipple.
Belt sander and file to size nipple to length needed.
Opened up the screw hole using 100 grit sandpaper wrapped around a small steel rod.
2 part 5 minute heavy duty epoxy to set.
I've done it 3 times, easier each time.












Take your time, check fit constantly until satisfied.
 
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brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#21
That looks really good. And I think sanding the hole bigger is the safest way. What outer diameter are those brass things? I also orderd some lamprod. Maybe I can get some steelpipe also so I don't need to enlarge the holes as much. I also orderd something similar to devcon a that I can get in europe...
 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#23
Need to see if I can get something like this at the local hardware store. Do you attach the pillars to the action first I guess? I wanna pillar and glas bed it in one step.
 
Apr 21, 2012
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#24
I epoxy dot shimmed the action before doing the pillar job.
That let me establish the position of the barrel in the channel
and the final location of the receiver before doing the pillar work.
After pillaring did final bedding of receiver, dot shims peeled out.

This was the 455 American...dot shims are visible

 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#25
Interesting idea! I will wrap the barrel with tape and leave a contact point at the tang and remove the other wood thats touching the receiver
 
Apr 21, 2012
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#26
Epoxy dot shims are a fast and easy way to stabilize a receiver.
5 minute epoxy applied at the exact point of support wanted.



With the barrel tape wrapped thick enough to center in the channel
just before the epoxy sets the waxed receiver is set in place and the action screws tightened to 10 inch-lbs.



The dot of epoxy flattens and exactly fills the void making a perfect fit shim.
The dot shims can be done one at a time or several at once.
By waiting for the epoxy to start to gel, there is no drippy mess to deal with.

With the receiver tightly fitted to the inletting by the dot shims, it's easier to create and install the pillars.
Add a couple dots at the rear corners of the tang and the receiver won't shift position each time you remove and install.




This is a 455 American with the open inletting before pillaring.
Dot shims along both sides of the inletting ensure an exact fit before fabricating the pillars.
Dot shims alone do improve accuracy on the 455 stocks due to the slop created at the factory.

 
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brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#27
That looks like a pain to get out again. I will remove wood anyways so I can get some epoxy between the reciver and the stock.
 
Apr 21, 2012
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#28
Actually, as long as you don't sand the finish of the barrel channel or inletting
the epoxy shims peel right out using a sharp edged pry. They look like fake fingernails when removed.
 

brake17

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Jul 9, 2018
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#29
Have done it now used just a dremel tool and it worked great. Did turn out better than expectet for the first time I did this. Hope it improved accuracy but I will see.
 
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