Building the Perfect Reloading Room

Mike 556

Sergeant of the Hide
Jan 31, 2018
549
1,235
93
Northeast PA
Im planning on building another bench along the right wall so I can add another press and maybe some case-prep stuff, to keep it separate from the loading bench. I also want to add a quick change track to the new bench so I can move stuff around as I please.







Great looking setup! Better looking pup! :)
Mike
 
Likes: svthuh

MountainHunter

Sergeant of the Hide
Jan 22, 2018
114
36
28
Montana
This setup is working out pretty well for me, a lot better than my last one that was a mobile bench that I had to work from both sides.

It's probably not as fast as a progressive but I'm able to go from an unprepped case to a finished round in the time it's taking the Chargemaster to throw 42 grains of 4350, about 25 seconds.

I'm pretty much sick of my RCBS presses that I got from my uncle though. I got them from him 10 years ago and I have no idea how long he had them before that. I'm thinking I need to try a COAX.





 
Likes: Terry H

scott_gresham

Online Training Member
Jan 1, 2018
113
59
28
42
Argyle, Texas
thesuicidebunny.net
"Fill'em and Kill'em" Yes ! great. Love it. @scott_gresham

Those hinged stool seats are wicked nice.
Thanks! Those were actually left over from our kitchen remodel. My wife had bought three of those for under our bar in the kitchen, and they didn't work well with the size of the bar overhang, so I lucked into them!
 
Likes: BLKWLFK9
Jan 23, 2010
2,782
2,229
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Morley IA
My reloading area is in the living portion of our home. I used a bench I had built for years when I was shooting pistol comps and LRP rifle stuff, but the bench just didn’t fit in. We live in a renoed country home that was built in 1895 but the basement is not suitable for precision equipment (damp). I stopped pistol comps about 4 years ago and decided to downsize a bit. I wanted to be able to continue to load pistol and rifle but on a smaller bench. I wanted the bench to look like a piece of furniture and fit in with the rest of the room.

I followed this thread and others looking for ideas. I finally came across the bench that Terry H built, and with his permission, stole his design. Hired a retired cabinet maker who is also a shooter, and put together a plan, settled on a price, materials, etc... A few months later, I’m kind of “moved in”.

Solid White Oak construction, 100 lb rated slides, 5/4” top with T track (I have multiple presses mounted on aluminum plate), 3/4” Maple drawers, etc... It’s built Hell for stout and HEAVY.

E82876C2-49A9-472B-956E-06FD4515F1B4.jpeg A493EF7D-450C-4E70-A9E3-9016B33326B7.jpeg CAA4B83E-A6C1-4733-BEF8-FD51A989DA60.jpeg F8C2BF98-84BC-4BF4-9014-0EC323A052A7.jpeg 69474A65-E00A-4882-A5A9-6E36C12A7DE3.jpeg 6FE06AE8-5160-4F8B-8325-11F307307CFF.jpeg
 
Jul 20, 2017
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My reloading area is in the living portion of our home. I used a bench I had built for years when I was shooting pistol comps and LRP rifle stuff, but the bench just didn’t fit in. We live in a renoed country home that was built in 1895 but the basement is not suitable for precision equipment (damp). I stopped pistol comps about 4 years ago and decided to downsize a bit. I wanted to be able to continue to load pistol and rifle but on a smaller bench. I wanted the bench to look like a piece of furniture and fit in with the rest of the room.

I followed this thread and others looking for ideas. I finally came across the bench that Terry H built, and with his permission, stole his design. Hired a retired cabinet maker who is also a shooter, and put together a plan, settled on a price, materials, etc... A few months later, I’m kind of “moved in”.

Solid White Oak construction, 100 lb rated slides, 5/4” top with T track (I have multiple presses mounted on aluminum plate), 3/4” Maple drawers, etc... It’s built Hell for stout and HEAVY.

View attachment 6911334 View attachment 6911335 View attachment 6911336 View attachment 6911337 View attachment 6911338 View attachment 6911339
That turned out fantastic!!
 

RNWRKNP

Sophisticated Redneck
Dec 13, 2017
1,376
1,634
113
PHX, AZ
My Sophisticated Redneck reloading rig for when it’s 100 and holy shit it’s hot in the garage. Gave my wife a choice, I can build something permanent in the house or I can do this. God bless her for putting up with me and this is where I landed. Gorilla platform $29, left over wood $0, left over tech screws $0, left over wood screws $0, reloading in the AC........priceless😎

6F48281B-6F93-4261-8FA6-349D14D47FA7.jpeg
 
Likes: Sinocopa

mcfred

Sergeant
Feb 17, 2011
749
77
28
SW USA
Right now a Metal exterior door. with digital deadbolt and digital keypad. as you probably know, safe doors are crazy expensive!
A heavy metal fab shop might be able to fix you up real nice for a fraction of the cost of a retail pre-hung 'Vault' door. Only issue is that the onus is on you to design things unless your fabricator is good at design and working on-the-fly. Also, check craigslist for such things. I know a guy that got a smokin' deal on an older 1600lb vault door/jam that was reclaimed from some former jewelry store's demolition. *Insanely* cheap. It was serious overkill, but for the price, it was impossible to beat.
 

USMC0811

New Hide Member
Jan 20, 2018
12
10
3
Windsor, CO
A heavy metal fab shop might be able to fix you up real nice for a fraction of the cost of a retail pre-hung 'Vault' door. Only issue is that the onus is on you to design things unless your fabricator is good at design and working on-the-fly. Also, check craigslist for such things. I know a guy that got a smokin' deal on an older 1600lb vault door/jam that was reclaimed from some former jewelry store's demolition. *Insanely* cheap. It was serious overkill, but for the price, it was impossible to beat.
Funny you mention this, I actually have a buddy who is designing one for me. He owns a metal shop. Gonna be sweet!
 

TITUSROCK

New Hide Member
Jul 10, 2018
3
3
3
How do you like that Hornady Iron press?
I’ve only been reloading for a year and this is the only press I have ever used so please keep that in mind.

I like it so far but do have trouble with long straight wall revolver cartridges (.460S&W) with keeping the case aligned when entering the sizing die. In talking with Hornady about this minor issue they confirmed that with the tolerances they use because it was designed as a “precision rifle press”, this could be a problem. Other than that I had to monkey with the auto prime to get it to feed consistently but again, more of an inconvenience than issue.

The selling point for me was the open front which is awesome. A little pricey but it is one heavy duty press!
 

Pixel_wasted

Shepard_of_fire
Sep 19, 2017
22
2
3
Peoples Republik
After find this thread,and seeing the you tube video,now i need to redo mine.i found a gladiator garageworks 6 ft,with attached 6 ft power strip that has at least 6-8 outlets.got it for 150 on a returned clearance.i have twin 650’s mounted and with that i am pressed for space.8 foot would be perfect.but so would kicking the wifes car out of the garage
 
May 9, 2008
511
1
18
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Co. Durham, North of England
padom Awesome! I think I'm gonna try and build a 48" replica of this. I may bother you for additional photos come spring time.
Hi, I know it might be a bit late... But I believe you can get a set of plans for a really great reloading bench/storage combo from American Reloading Organisation (?) not entirely sure of the name, but you can google it. It’s an industry organisation, but the plans are free and it looks like a REALLY good bench.
I got the plans, bought the lumber, never built the bench... Kids came & took over my life!
Now that they both shoot, I might re-visit this & put them to work reloading for me...
 

ken4570tc in WY

Sergeant of the Hide
Aug 30, 2018
213
66
28
63
Wheatland, Wyoming
Wow, what a thread !!!

Since I've only been a part of the forum for a few days, I saved the reloading room thread for a whole day to absorb. I've moved too frequently during my youth and 20+ years in the military to setup a nice reloading area. Now that I'm 63, full time retired and have a home across the street from the mortuary my next move shouldn't be far. Since I'm counting on modern medical science to help keep me reloading and shooting till I'm 150, I'll get going on my reloading area. I have a few thoughts to offer for consideration that I didn't see in the thread. The first would be that if there is any overhead or same floor plumbing the time will come when floor level water will happen. I suggest that all benches and cabinets have water resistant plates under them to hold them up 3/4" to 1-1/2". The simplest and most economical way is to use outdoor composite decking boards to cut, mill, shape, stack in whatever way is needed to get everything that can wick water or rust off the floor. Bench legs, wood or metal need this protection and if you have press board cabinets or closets you can imagine that they quickly become trash once water gets to them. Second, build modular, I mean that whatever you put in should be small enough it can be taken out without having to demolish it or the building. You can still make it in bolt together sections that have the appearance and utility of a very large work area. Keep in mind door widths and the ability to move around tight corners, narrow hallways and stairwells. Make the bench tops removable, if your laminating add blind nuts so it can be bolted down from underneath. If using butcher block or some other thick solid you can add wood-to-bolt threaded adapters. Half or more of the weight can easily be in these tops. Third, consider not wasting space on swinging cabinet doors use sliders. They are much lighter in weight and don't require the movement of tall or large objects such as bikes and stools or progressive equipment. Things are uncertain in life, many a retired person thought that they were in their last home only to find out their beloved spouse is deciding they need to live closer to the kids and grand kids.
 

Defender3

Online Training Member
Mar 8, 2010
206
121
43
NoVA
I don't know about perfect, but it works for me. I put some Rockler T-tracks in the top so I can easily swap out presses or equipment.
 

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Defender3

Online Training Member
Mar 8, 2010
206
121
43
NoVA
Looks hell for stout and very practical. Nicely done 👍🏻
Thanks, I honestly thought Hitlery would win so I wanted to stock up on reloading stuff, which meant I needed someplace to put it all. I had loads of wood and just needed the plywood, drawer glides and stools. Sketched it out on a pad and built it in place. It will be staying here when we move. ;)

Defender3,

I like the bobble heads to keep you company and supervise.
Yes! Uncle Si keeps me straight while the Trumpster continues to annoy HH6.
 

ken4570tc in WY

Sergeant of the Hide
Aug 30, 2018
213
66
28
63
Wheatland, Wyoming
How many of us have old, obsolete or multiples of equipment that could be sold at a club or range flee sale with some of the proceeds going to the club, range or kids shooting programs? I couldn't help but notice four different balance scales in one of the photos.
 
Apr 4, 2013
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I've got a question for you guys that have been reloading for a while. What is a good bench top height to be at? Background-

I built a new house this summer, now moved in, and I'm starting to eye up the future gun room. I have no reloading experience, so when it comes to building my bench I'm looking at tons of pictures and gathering ideas. My lack of experience means that I don't know how tall a bench needs to be. I'm about 5'9" for reference. Do any of you have a high bench that you sometimes stand and sometimes sit?

Your advice is appreciated.
 

ken4570tc in WY

Sergeant of the Hide
Aug 30, 2018
213
66
28
63
Wheatland, Wyoming
I've got a question for you guys that have been reloading for a while. What is a good bench top height to be at? Background-

I built a new house this summer, now moved in, and I'm starting to eye up the future gun room. I have no reloading experience, so when it comes to building my bench I'm looking at tons of pictures and gathering ideas. My lack of experience means that I don't know how tall a bench needs to be. I'm about 5'9" for reference. Do any of you have a high bench that you sometimes stand and sometimes sit?

Your advice is appreciated.
Your best bet, to get the correct height for you, is to go to the kitchen counter with your tape measure. Set your hands on the counter then raise them to what you think would be the most comfortable working height for you with elbows bent. Measure from the floor to the chosen height above the counter. Depending on your height and arm length you will probably end up at about 38 to 42 inches. I like mine at 40 inches. The kitchen counter would be to low for me to work at comfortably. Take into consideration what equipment you'll be using and the amount of travel up and down your arm will need to operate the press. You don't want to have to bend over on the down stroke of the lever when standing. For sitting you can adjust the height on a good office style stool to accommodate the finished height of the bench.
 
Likes: sirhrmechanic

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
Feb 23, 2010
11,304
15,603
113
54
The Snobbiest Town in The Snobbiest State in the N
Kitchen counter height is good... And get yourself a stool with adjustable height. I worked off of desks, kitchen counters, card tables.... finally built my room at the same height as kitchen counters. I forgot the exact number, but there is a spec. And with a stool and standing... works great.

That said, I am average height. If you are short/tall.... work accordingly.

I understand Frank's reloading bench is built on a shoeshine box. But that's just him.

Cheers,

Sirhr