Building the Perfect Reloading Room

Fitz.

Nothing Interesting
I'm a mechanical engineer. I have a personal CAD license, Solidworks.
I'm looking at building a reloading bench.

If Y'all are into reviewing tearing apart and making sure it's the best that it can be I'll be your CAD monkey.

Upon completion I'll provide detail drawings and BOM.

Fitz.
 
A few years back I finished my basement after spending more than a few years designing my reloading room in my head.

36 total feet of bench. Two rows of outlets. One above the bench and one below. If a machine requires electricity, that cord is run through the bench top and into the outlet below to keep clutter down to a dull roar. In the 1050s, the spend primers also go through the benchtop and into a can below.

The cabinets were heavily reinforced to allow bullets to be stored and to make them more rigid and stable.







 

YukonRob

Sergeant of the Hide
Moving for the first time in 20 years... here is the start to my new gun room. 64E4FF4C-DB52-4BFB-AA61-C34AC4AF1393.jpeg
This bench is my “reloading side”, the other half of the room will be for working on rifles. 728EB8C7-B950-487A-97D9-6A69479B07BB.jpeg
I’ll probably work on getting all my crap in there, start the process of figuring out where and how I want stuff to be arraigned.
I can’t make such a huge commitment to a layout/configuration as Sihr or Orcan did right out of the gate, I’m reserving the right to redo or change major layout parameters. That means no wood paneling or major ascetic considerations until I’m sure I won’t be moving benches, walls, wiring etc.
 
A few years back I finished my basement after spending more than a few years designing my reloading room in my head.

36 total feet of bench. Two rows of outlets. One above the bench and one below. If a machine requires electricity, that cord is run through the bench top and into the outlet below to keep clutter down to a dull roar. In the 1050s, the spend primers also go through the benchtop and into a can below.

The cabinets were heavily reinforced to allow bullets to be stored and to make them more rigid and stable.








Incredible set up!! Very, very nice. Even a Prometheus!
 

Airw4ves

Sergeant of the Hide
New home owner so dont mind the unfinished basement. I have learned a lot building my new bench, as its my first time building anything out of woodshop class in high school (like 10yrs).
Always wanted an “heirloom” quality bench, and I think I’ve done pretty well with it so far. I still have the shelves to do, and will be finishing them up once it warms up, but for now it will do just fine. Top is 2” thick Ash, and I swear weighs 200lbs. Im 6’5” so the bench is definitely a custom height, but I love it.
Cleaned up and finished pics will come when mother nature is cooperates.

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So I’m in the middle of building my new reloading room. Still need to finish up wiring and the do insulation and drywall ect. For bench tops I was thinking maybe concrete. Like the kitchen concrete counters. Can put color in them ect and a sealer . What you guys think ?
 
I have hoarded thousands of pounds of reloading components and gear.
More stuff will not make you happier, but buying more stuff always seems to offer hope of more happiness.
My reloading room is packed with stuff to the ceiling on 3 sides, and to the level of the windows on the 4th.
I have a mobile reloading setup that is in my camper or alongside my computer.
The reloading room is a storage area for a lot of presses, bullets, brass, and dies.
Exception: For cartridge conversion I have to work in the reloading room.
Exception: For turning necks, I have to go into the shop for the big lathe. turning case neck on lathe 20180201_080830.jpg
 

Nodakplowboy

Sergeant of the Hide
In the middle of last summer, the Child Bride and I made a 100 mile westward move from a small rural community to a slightly larger rural community. I left my shop/reloading room of 30 years behind. We live in a rented house, and will not probably settle here after we pull the retirement pins. I took over a space in the basement and built my new loading area. Nothing fancy, but very functional. New remodel job won't start until next week, took the day to spruce up the space and assemble tools and scales. Getting closer... P2150733.JPG

During the move, I found these gems. Aging myself... P2150732.JPG

Nosler #1, Sierra #1, Hornady #2, Hogdon #23 ($4.95). All bought new between 1974-78. I have Hornady #1 somewhere, my first loading book. Might have lent it out to somebody.

Still some winter left, time to start loading.
 
A few years back I finished my basement after spending more than a few years designing my reloading room in my head.

36 total feet of bench. Two rows of outlets. One above the bench and one below. If a machine requires electricity, that cord is run through the bench top and into the outlet below to keep clutter down to a dull roar. In the 1050s, the spend primers also go through the benchtop and into a can below.

The cabinets were heavily reinforced to allow bullets to be stored and to make them more rigid and stable.







Hoser,

How thick are those countertops and did you have to reinforce the underside for the presses?
 
Hoser,

How thick are those countertops and did you have to reinforce the underside for the presses?
They were the standard thickness. I glued and screwed a layer of 3/4 inch thick plywood on all of it to level it all out. Then screwed 2x8s on the top of the cabinets so the countertop would have something solid to bolt up against. I used screws coming up from the bottom to attach the countertop to the cabinets.

Long story short, after the plywood and 2x8, the bench top is about 4 inches thick to minimize flex and movement.
 
So I’m in the middle of building my new reloading room. Still need to finish up wiring and the do insulation and drywall ect. For bench tops I was thinking maybe concrete. Like the kitchen concrete counters. Can put color in them ect and a sealer . What you guys think ?
I use concrete countertops in most of my house builds, yes you can dye them or stain them but they still need to be sealed. I wouldn’t recommend them for a loading bench though because it’s going to be difficult to mount anything to them. Also the concrete tends to warp slightly as it sets up and could create problems on a loading bench.
 
I use concrete countertops in most of my house builds, yes you can dye them or stain them but they still need to be sealed. I wouldn’t recommend them for a loading bench though because it’s going to be difficult to mount anything to them. Also the concrete tends to warp slightly as it sets up and could create problems on a loading bench.
Roger that.