Brass Annealing Guide

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<iframe width="500" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fiIrLvAUh6o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 
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Steelhead43XGunny Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/14/2014
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Helpful vid. Thanks.

I got a buttload of 260 brass that I need to anneal and hope to start this week.

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shotdown

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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/14/2014
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Very useful video. I'm using the same setup and caliber brass. However, my time is at 3.8 sec compared to their 3 sec. I do use a slower flame speed so I believe that is the reason why.

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gixxerk8XSergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/14/2014
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Got my bench source yesterday and ran my first batch of 308 lapua brass today. Looks like I need to lower my flame just a tad to get lower on the brass. Loaded round is new brass. 650 and 400 tempilaq looked ok. Any input appreciated



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Steelhead43XGunny Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/14/2014
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Orkan, do you use tempilaq or go strictly by what your sacrificial cases tell you?

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orkan

XFirst Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/14/2014
(13 votes)
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Stricly what my cases tell me. Each case has slightly different alloys in it. Temp paint does not tell the whole story.

As for flame height, yeah, I'd go a little lower on those. You want to get about 1/4 way down the case from the shoulder. Keep the torches level, (not angled) and the flames crashing into each other at the mid-point where the brass sits.

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Steelhead43XGunny Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/14/2014
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orkan wrote:
Stricly what my cases tell me. Each case has slightly different alloys in it. Temp paint does not tell the whole story.

Thanks.

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shoot4fun

XFirst Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/15/2014
[HR][/HR]I use temp paint on the head to keep me from overheating. The neck gets what the case tells me. I use a couple of throw away cases for testing. My R-P 260 brass is about 3.8 seconds also. There is no uniform answer for how long you need to anneal because of differences in brass and flame temo. I clean all my brass in SS media before annealing. After I resize I use corn cob for final finish and removal of any lube left from the sizing process.
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ValhallXSergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/15/2014
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THe video is quite decent and you give some good pointers.

For anyone that is starting out annealing, the first thing i'd advice to do is simply read up on some good information, so you atually have a grasp of what your actually doing and want to achieve.

here is a few decent ones.

accurateshooter.com/technical-articles/annealing

bisonballistics.com/articles/the-science-of-cartridge-brass-annealing



As for adviing people not to use Tempilaq, because cases does not have the exat same metallurgy is really not a sound advice.

First off you should ensure that your case neck get to a high enough temperature, for the brass grain structure to change sufficiently, witch is what you want to achieve in the first place, and that certainly wont happen below 600 F, regardless of metallurgy.

Secondly using too high a temp will permanently ruin your brass even if it is just for a few seconds.

The Tempilaq will give you some very good indicators as to what is actually happening with the brass.



Using both your eyes and Tempilaq is highly adviced, if you want to do it correctly.







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orkan

XFirst Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/15/2014
(11 votes)
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Valhall wrote:
As for adviing people not to use Tempilaq, because cases does not have the exat same metallurgy is really not a sound advice.

First off you should ensure that your case neck get to a high enough temperature, for the brass grain structure to change sufficiently, witch is what you want to achieve in the first place, and that certainly wont happen below 600 F, regardless of metallurgy.​
That's your opinion, and you are happy to voice it. Though it is just like every other bit of annealing advice given in most places: Overly complicated.

Each brand of brass and each lot number from those manufacturers will react slightly differently. The point at which they start burning off metals from the alloy will vary in time, but the point just before that is correctly annealed. Period. You say "regardless of metallurgy," but that's the entire topic at hand. I had my process vetted by a professional metallurgist that works for one of the worlds largest oil companies and makes ridiculous money. He knows more about brass alloy than anyone I've ever talked with in my life. If you want to use your paint sticks, go right ahead. People following my method will experience a faster setup time and a certainty of process that they would not experience otherwise... and it's easy to do.

You quote specific temperatures, yet say that every brass is different. That doesn't track does it? My process allows you to identify what each type of brass specifically behaves like. Finding exactly where you start ruining the brass, and allowing you to back off from it to ensure a perfect annealing temperature every time regardless of brass type. There IS no better method. I've spent several years looking for one, and no one has written anything or produced any evidence of it. I've been advocating this type of setup for the last several years, and those that heed the advice report back with excellent results every time.

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Steelhead43XGunny Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/15/2014
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[HR][/HR]Thanks orkan, Just annealed 50 of my oldest cases.
12 firings on them, sure made a difference when I sized them and bullet seating feel was a lot more consistent.
Went outside and shot 2 groups of 5, didn't hurt anything but that brass was showing vertical issues at distance.
Looking forward to trying them past 1000.

5 seconds with single torch, Win 243 brass sized to 260.
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orkan

XFirst Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/15/2014
(9 votes)
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Excellent! Anneal about every 3 firings or so at least, and you'll have more consistent release. I have a machine, so I anneal every firing... because it's easy. ;)

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goodgorillaXSergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/16/2014 Last edited 12/16/2014 by goodgorilla
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Do you anneal before or after resizing? I would guess before.

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orkan

XFirst Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/16/2014
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Anneal before resizing. The heat will tend to move the metal around a bit as it's being stress releived, so sizing will get them all uniform again before trimming.

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BigMahi2

XFirst Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/16/2014
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Awesome video Orkan, I wish I saw this when I first started out. A few years ago (even now) there's a bunch of misconceptions and I learned the hard way (standing cases in water, heating till red, drying in the oven, and what not...).

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tho98027XSergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/16/2014
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Orkan, what's your opinion of dropping the cases in water after annealing. Seems like some do it and some don't. Does it matter? Great vid by the way.

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orkan

XFirst Sergeant
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/16/2014
(9 votes)
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Doesn't matter at all. I don't quench.

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PenguininXPrivate
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Re: Brass Annealing Guide
12/17/2014 Last edited 12/17/2014 by Penguinin
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And the reason not to quench is simply that the brass is thin enough and the batches are large enough that the brass is cool by the time you are ready to begin the rest of the process?

Now I have also heard some shinanigans about you shouldn't quench brass becuase it would work harden it, but from what i understand about brass is that you will not recieve really any hardening in the brass since brass work hardens only when being cold worked yea?

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Just thought you guys might be interested in my homemade annealing machine.



<iframe width="500" height="281" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Jv75-9p9yFA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 
Feb 17, 2017
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Colorado
#4
Very good information. I am trying to decide on what the best annealing machine or method to start with. May start out with tempilaq, cordless drill and propane torch as I have everything. Any opinions on best annealing machines for weekend warrior and cost?
 
Apr 7, 2017
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San Diego, CA
#6
IRT: "I'm using the same setup and caliber brass. However, my time is at 3.8 sec compared to their 3 sec. I do use a slower flame speed so I believe that is the reason why."

Isn't the real question: what temperature for how many seconds? I'm looking for numbers on different calibers and even different manufactures to know how long and at what temperature to run my .223 Lapua brass through the home made annealer. Does anyone know of sources for this info? Thanks!
 

orkan

Primal Rights, Inc.
Oct 27, 2008
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#7
If you listen to what is said during that video, you will see that you are not asking the right question. Each type of brass is different, and each flame type and conditions are different. So, if you use the method I describe in the video, it will account for all of those variables and ensure proper annealing. Time and temp vary. The moment a specific piece of brass is correctly annealed, is shown by the flame color change which comes after it. Simple, and effective. If you read this thread and watch that video, all of the answers are right there in front of you.