Bipod facing forward or backward?

IronmanDaremo

Libtard Snowflake
Minuteman
Sep 9, 2019
61
35
24
Maryland
I've seen both positions being used in various images both here and on the rest of the interwebs. What is the advantage of having the legs fold forward - assuming the bipod only has a 90 degree rotation capability.

Is it so that when you load the legs, you don't run the risk of them collapsing in from the spring? I've been working on loading my Harris bipod at the range before taking my shots, and didn't think there was ever enough pressure to cause the legs to fold back?
 

brianf

Private
Belligerents
Apr 8, 2010
1,817
1,679
219
42
NY
correct harris legs fold forward so they dont collapse when rifle recoils

if loaded correctly on a low recoil or heavy rifle you can get away with them folding toward the trigger/back, but that is not the "correct way" and asking for trouble sooner or later

other bipods that have a locking pin like a atlas etc, the direction is user preference
 

IronmanDaremo

Libtard Snowflake
Minuteman
Sep 9, 2019
61
35
24
Maryland
Got it. I'm shooting an RPR 6.5CM, so recoil hasn't been an issue. I'll flip it around for the next time I go to the range.

Thanks!
 
  • Like
Reactions: TACC

ShtrRdy

Gunny Sergeant
Belligerents
Sep 17, 2011
2,146
387
189
65
High Plains
correct harris legs fold forward so they dont collapse when rifle recoils

if loaded correctly on a low recoil or heavy rifle you can get away with them folding toward the trigger/back, but that is not the "correct way" and asking for trouble sooner or later

other bipods that have a locking pin like a atlas etc, the direction is user preference
I'm sorry, but that just doesn't make sense. If recoil pushes the rifle back, and the legs rotate to the front, (e.g. Harris), then the legs could collapse given this argument.

I believe the Harris legs folding forward is so you can put some pressure into them without the chance of collapsing.
 

Romeo458

Private
Minuteman
Sep 20, 2019
50
52
24
My legs fold forward on all my rifles so I can load the bipod. That is the way that I was taught to use a bipod. If their legs fold backwards I cannot do this.
 

brianf

Private
Belligerents
Apr 8, 2010
1,817
1,679
219
42
NY
I'm sorry, but that just doesn't make sense. If recoil pushes the rifle back, and the legs rotate to the front, (e.g. Harris), then the legs could collapse given this argument.

I believe the Harris legs folding forward is so you can put some pressure into them without the chance of collapsing.
A rifle should only recoil a very short distance if at all when proper fundamentals are had.

if you try and load a bipod with legs folding toward the rear/trigger...hope you like cleaning dirt out of the bore
 

lash

Swamp Rat
Belligerents
Sep 28, 2012
4,958
3,695
219
60
Central Florida
A rifle should only recoil a very short distance if at all when proper fundamentals are had.

if you try and load a bipod with legs folding toward the rear/trigger...hope you like cleaning dirt out of the bore
By the same token, if you are loading the bipod hard enough to overcome the spring tension on a Harris bipod, then you should probably revisit your fundamentals.
 

chevy_man

Sergeant of the Hide
Belligerents
Minuteman
Jan 25, 2019
399
227
49
Harris folds forward to absorb the recoil. It's why the design is so easy to shoot well, as you can be lazy. They don't need to be loaded, as the legs can rock against the springs instead of hopping the legs.

Any of the locking designs you must load up and take the slack out. That slack lets it rock in the recoil instead of hop. It's also why they're much more critical on needing to be loaded against recoil.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lash

Dthomas3523

Well Calloused Knees
Hessian
Online Training Access
Belligerents
Jan 31, 2018
4,958
5,020
119
South Texas
Harris folds forward to absorb the recoil. It's why the design is so easy to shoot well, as you can be lazy. They don't need to be loaded, as the legs can rock against the springs instead of hopping the legs.

Any of the locking designs you must load up and take the slack out. That slack lets it rock in the recoil instead of hop. It's also why they're much more critical on needing to be loaded against recoil.
Sounds good on paper. But Harris bipod are notorious for “hopping” because people don’t load them properly.

Bipod still needs to be loaded, Harris or not.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 308pirate

Dthomas3523

Well Calloused Knees
Hessian
Online Training Access
Belligerents
Jan 31, 2018
4,958
5,020
119
South Texas
Harris folds forward to absorb the recoil. It's why the design is so easy to shoot well, as you can be lazy. They don't need to be loaded, as the legs can rock against the springs instead of hopping the legs.

Any of the locking designs you must load up and take the slack out. That slack lets it rock in the recoil instead of hop. It's also why they're much more critical on needing to be loaded against recoil.
Also, fwiw, your understanding of what happens to the system under recoil is flawed.

Bullet goes one way, rifle goes the other. Any “hop” is because the shooter isn’t behind the gun properly. Either they give the gun a running start, or they are too tense and don’t absorb the recoil properly, and the gun takes the path of least resistance which is usually down and away from the shooter (causing a high left reticle jump for right handed shooter). That’s what causes the front of the rifle to “hop.”

Loading the bipod has very little to do with the mechanics of the bipod. Loading the slack out is a product of getting behind the rifle to properly manage recoil.
 

chevy_man

Sergeant of the Hide
Belligerents
Minuteman
Jan 25, 2019
399
227
49
Also, fwiw, your understanding of what happens to the system under recoil is flawed.

Bullet goes one way, rifle goes the other. Any “hop” is because the shooter isn’t behind the gun properly. Either they give the gun a running start, or they are too tense and don’t absorb the recoil properly, and the gun takes the path of least resistance which is usually down and away from the shooter (causing a high left reticle jump for right handed shooter). That’s what causes the front of the rifle to “hop.”

Loading the bipod has very little to do with the mechanics of the bipod. Loading the slack out is a product of getting behind the rifle to properly manage recoil.

I didn't say it was right, but I've seen quite a few get away with it. Maybe because we have grippy rubber mats on our shooting benches the Harris feet grab.

I've had to explain to quite a few how to shoot an Atlas after they swear they broke a scope after switching from a Harris or clone.
 

acudaowner

Major Hide Member
Belligerents
Minuteman
Dec 26, 2018
1,407
724
119
for the tables that give enough room I like forward shorter tables back as long as I can lean into it a bit .
 

IronmanDaremo

Libtard Snowflake
Minuteman
Sep 9, 2019
61
35
24
Maryland
Flipped it around when I got to the range yesterday, loaded it properly, and shot at 200 yards. Felt much more reassured that things were working the way they were supposed to that way!

Average ended up being .872 MOA for twelve 5-round groups. Only my third time at the range on the rifle, first time out to 200 yards. Best group was 1.25" at 200 (.625 MOA).

All from the bench though .... still need to get prone and work on that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: seansmd

C4N4DIAN

Private
Minuteman
Aug 16, 2019
31
23
12
The integrated Bipod of the Steyr Scout folds "Backward" and you need to be very careful when loading it as to not make it fold.

it is never correct and potentially dangerous to fold a bipod "backward" unless it is a fixed position like the Atlas.
 

Diver160651

Who cares
Belligerents
Feb 7, 2013
3,790
2,608
219
BELMONTCA
A lot of the hunters do it because they don't want them to catch on everything

But it's wrong, a Harris is designed to fold forward, not backward.
Hunters do it because they don’t really know..

Most hunters in thick brush either don’t use a bipod or if they do a long one that can’t fold backwards because gets in the way..

I hunt and shoot matches. Often, I am afraid to say “I am a hunter” just for the lack of marksmanship many casual hunters display. Generally and historically (not always) hunters can not shoot all that well or really understand their weapon systems past the distance the average lady can hit a golf ball. I say this as a super generalized statement. The ones that put in the time and have good field skills often do the same same with the rifle side. These are the ones that can shoot :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: lash

blindeye

Private
Minuteman
Feb 23, 2018
22
11
6
Ohio
I like to load a Harris bipod on a gas gun. I find it easier to stay on target by doing this to reduce the movement from the bolt moving. With a bolt rifle I try to settle the rifle without as much load in the bipod. Is this a poor practice?
 
Last edited:

zog

Private
Minuteman
Aug 21, 2019
55
8
12
61
But Harris bipod are notorious for “hopping” because people don’t load them properly.

Bipod still needs to be loaded, Harris or not.
Since this is the stupid question forum, I'll ask . . . . . what is "loading" a bipod? Sounds like it means you need to be sure that it's got forward pressure, so legs are canted rearward from the stock to the feet, when you pull the trigger, so it can give a little with the recoil?
 

IronmanDaremo

Libtard Snowflake
Minuteman
Sep 9, 2019
61
35
24
Maryland
Watch some of Lowlight's videos. See how he always lifts the stock and settles into the rifle? Applying mild forward pressure so you create a solid connection b/w you and the rifle. This is the "loading" of the bipod. If the bipod does not have a stable surface to bite into, it will move. That is also why you can get different "feet" for some bipods; to dig into the surface.
 

zog

Private
Minuteman
Aug 21, 2019
55
8
12
61
Watch some of Lowlight's videos. See how he always lifts the stock and settles into the rifle? Applying mild forward pressure so you create a solid connection b/w you and the rifle. This is the "loading" of the bipod. If the bipod does not have a stable surface to bite into, it will move. That is also why you can get different "feet" for some bipods; to dig into the surface.
Thanks. I think I got it now but it only leads to the next stupid question - How do I find lowlight videos? I see from above that lowlight is HMFIC of this stuff , but didn't see how to find any videos.

And, well OK, the next stupid question - I'm purty sure I figured out MFIC, but what is H?
 

IronmanDaremo

Libtard Snowflake
Minuteman
Sep 9, 2019
61
35
24
Maryland
"Head mfer in charge".

You can go to Youtube, search Lowlight/Sniper's Hide, and subscribe. Tons of good videos on precision shooting. Online training unlocks more videos and really informative stuff (I still need would like to sign up, just haven't yet).
 

zog

Private
Minuteman
Aug 21, 2019
55
8
12
61
"Head mfer in charge".

You can go to Youtube, search Lowlight/Sniper's Hide, and subscribe. Tons of good videos on precision shooting. Online training unlocks more videos and really informative stuff (I still need would like to sign up, just haven't yet).
OK thanks. I figured it could've been Head, Highest, Holy, Honored, Heavy, Hotshot, or maybe all of them.

I will definitely go to the online training, thanks.