Beefy w00t!

hlee

Sergeant
Jul 14, 2012
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#6
The chance of getting real Wagyu or Kobi beef in America is about the same as busting Madonna's cherry.
No necessarily. Wagyu beef cattle are raised in the US, both crossbreed with angus (American style Kobe beef) and as pure bred animals. There is also an American Wagyu Breeders Association.
 

diverdon

Constitutionalist, by choice
Dec 21, 2011
3,299
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#8
No necessarily. Wagyu beef cattle are raised in the US, both crossbreed with angus (American style Kobe beef) and as pure bred animals. There is also an American Wagyu Breeders Association.
But Wagyu and Koby are not recognized trademarks in the US so any beef (including holstien) can legally be marketed as Wagyu. I'll admit that most often you will get prime Black angus but it is not the same as Wagyu. In Wagyu the fat has two differences. One, the marbling is in much smaller globules and it has a much lower melting point. I had a friend who visited Japan on food industry business tell me that when they gave him a small piece of Kobe beef fat to hold in his hand that after a minute it almost completely liquefied.
 
Likes: Bender
Nov 10, 2010
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#9
But Wagyu and Koby are not recognized trademarks in the US so any beef (including holstien) can legally be marketed as Wagyu. I'll admit that most often you will get prime Black angus but it is not the same as Wagyu. In Wagyu the fat has two differences. One, the marbling is in much smaller globules and it has a much lower melting point. I had a friend who visited Japan on food industry business tell me that when they gave him a small piece of Kobe beef fat to hold in his hand that after a minute it almost completely liquefied.
Beings that a cow's internal body temp is 101.5 and your buddies hand is colder does that mean the fat in a Kobe cow is in a liquid state at all times?

Hey I am just asking.
 
Likes: Bender

hlee

Sergeant
Jul 14, 2012
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#11
But Wagyu and Koby are not recognized trademarks in the US so any beef (including holstien) can legally be marketed as Wagyu. I'll admit that most often you will get prime Black angus but it is not the same as Wagyu. In Wagyu the fat has two differences. One, the marbling is in much smaller globules and it has a much lower melting point. I had a friend who visited Japan on food industry business tell me that when they gave him a small piece of Kobe beef fat to hold in his hand that after a minute it almost completely liquefied.
To that point, “certified black angus brand” doesn’t mean shit either- it’s just marketing. Beef buyers buy every black cow that runs through the auction ring- and pay a premium for that black hair. None of those cows are delivered with a pedigree showing their parentage. I don’t know first hand what they do to “certify” the cattle as “angus,” but I’m pretty confident it’s “yep, that cow’s black, angus it is.” That angus (even “prime”) is being sold as wagyu makes me lol. Like all specialty items, if you don’t know what you are buying, you are asking for a counterfeit.
 

hlee

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Jul 14, 2012
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#12
I guess it would mean just that, which does seem odd.
I’m not calling your buddy a liar, but I think he wanted to make a distinction that’s not really there. That said, I cut open a deer I shot in NY state a few years ago that had 2 decidedly different types of fat. Around the circumference of the body it had the hard fat (opaque , almost crumbly) that I (as a TX deer hunter) am accustomed to. But, around the hips and shoulders it had globs (BIG globs) of translucent fat- the consistency of loose jello- that I had not seen before. I’m sure- to northern hunters- this is a common sight, but our TX deer generally don’t fatten up like that.