Anybody else drank the Crossfit Koolaid?

Sep 29, 2011
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pottsville, ky
#1
I just started crossfit. I have been interested in it for a while and even tried to do some crossfit like workouts at the local gym. I live in a reasonably rural part of Ky and there just wasn't a crossfit box available until recently. I came across this one by accident, and it is about a 30 min drive for me so I consider that reasonable. Kind of a funny story how I found it. A guy at work told me about this restaurant that had this most awesome fried pork tenderloin and egg, with gravy and biscuit breakfast and I went to try it one morning before work and low and behold right behind the restaurant was a damn crossfit box. I skipped on the eggs and gravy and went in to investigate. It took only a few minutes of watching the workout they were doing and chatting with the person at the desk to figure out this was worth a shot at least.
Having said that I am a month in now. Two weeks of beginner classes and two weeks of unlimited on your first month, I just paid up for my second month and went with the unlimited package. I would be interested to hear any advice that you all have, you all being people that also do crossfit, on diet for crossfit and how often you train. I'll preface that by saying I am way the fuck out of shape. like 6'0" tall, 292lbs out of shape. I used to workout a lot and so even though I am carrying about 70 or 80 extra pounds I am not just completely unable to work out. I scale what I need to scale like obviously, pullups, however I bench around 300, and squat in the 350 range, i clean and jerked 205, the other day for a 1rm. this morning I did a 4 mile ruck, with 35lb in my eberlestock. My main goal here is to lose weight obviously but not just numbers off the scale. I just want to get fit, and I think the way the workouts here are designed they provide the most practical and useful type of fitness and strength.
Any advice on frequency of training, and also supplemental training like the ruck I did this morning, is anyone doing that or do you stay just strictly with your crossfit
Proper dieting for crossfit, ie who is doing the paleo, or zone, what do you think of it. I have been trying to stick pretty close to the paleo diet just for its low carb properties. I'll take any advice you all got to give. Thanks Please save all the crossfit hating comments, I like it and I'm gonna do it, so post them if it makes you feel better but I'm not interested in a pissing contest over kipping pullups or whatever else people don't like about crossfit, just how to get better at it and lose some weight. I have an elk hunt coming up in Oct. and I would like to not have to haul anymore weight up that mountain than necessary.
 

-R-

Tactical as F***
Mar 5, 2014
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#2
I went to crossfit a handful of times. Its not for me, I prefer traditional bodybuilding type routines with HIIT and my own circuits for cardio. That being said, I definitely see benefits with crossfit and dont think it is bad by any means. (not starting a pissing contest I promise, just giving a disclaimer for me personally)

The most important piece of advice I can offer is maintain proper form!! I cant emphasize that enough, with any type of training, especially doing circuits that are timed and whatnot. No sense in rushing (or going too heavy) to the point of sacrificing form and getting injured. Frequency of training also depends on your own body, of course you want to push yourself, but listen to your body, muscle needs time to repair and heal itself and overtraining only leads to putting undue stress on your nervous system.

As far as diet is concerned. The basic premise of paleo is very similar to a typical Ketogenic diet (adaquate protein, high fat, low carbs). Google both, weigh the pros/cons and see which one you think you'd have an easier time sticking with. You'll need to establish what works for you as far as specific caloric intake and one may have more foods you like or dislike. The added exercise with a solid diet will yield results.

It is going to be a learning process in which you will need to decide specific factors for yourself based on your own level of fitness and how your body responds to your specific diet/training.

Sorry if this isnt much help, its hard to give someone a cut/paste routine and have it work for them 100% straight out of the gate.

How many times a week are you training now?

Feel free to ask any questions, I may be able to offer some insight.
 
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SuckitTrebek

The rapist for $200
Nov 22, 2005
207
17
18
The Great State of Texas
#5
Crossfit is great for more than a few reasons.

HOWEVER

Diet is 80% of the battle. Fuck all the fad diets, including paleo. Even though I think it's the most common sense "diet" out there.
It's not hard to figure out that anything processed is bad for your body. WOW that cuts out 90% of what most people eat, and there is your start.
 
Sep 29, 2011
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pottsville, ky
#6
I agree 100% that diet is 80% I just kind of use the paleo thing like you say as a guide. It is simply effective for what I want to do because of the low carb aspects of it. I am also portioning my meals ahead of time. Kitchen looks like a damn tupperware factory
 
Jan 20, 2014
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#7
I've been going since November. 35 years old and had not worked out since high school. I lost 25 lbs in 5 weeks. We just did a recheck on our size measurements and lost 10% BF, 2" in the waist and gained in muscular areas. More importantly was the fact that my body felt better, no aching, no foot pains, much more alert, and a lot more energy for my 3 year old. I went full bore, 5 days a week at 5am.

The reason I went this direction was that I knew I needed full guidance. The box opened 1000yds from my house and everyone was new.

Now the important part, you have to go into it with the right mentality. I have to constantly tell myself I'm in it for the health benefit not the competition. If I get hurt, it does me no good long term. I've had to hold back on the macho max out weight lifting stuff, short term. Believe me, I haven't left a WOD feeling like I cheated myself or didn't get a good workout.
 
Jan 20, 2014
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#8
Also to add, I didn't change my diet to much. Believe me I eat extremely bad, but when I started working out I could tell some of the foods I was eating weren't giving me the supplement I needed. As the trainers said would happen, I'm still loosing slightly, but gaining in muscular weight.
 
Feb 9, 2011
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mo
#10
I've been going for a year now. I go 5 days a week and listen my body. If it says take a day off that's what I do. I've lost 70 pounds and went down 4 pants sizes. Like others have said your edit is key. Not just for weight loss but performance too. I also agree with worrying about form and technique over speed. If you get hurt you can't workout. I feel really good these days and enjoy going and pushing myself. I know for sure that you get out of it what you put into it. But that goes for most things in life. Good luck with your journey.
 
Sep 29, 2011
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pottsville, ky
#11
I agree about the yogurt and the not pushing yourself to the point of injury, which I did this morning. I was stretching and popped something in my hip. It isn't real bad but I defenitley pulled or tore something a little. I'm just trying to cut out processed food and starches. No bread, pasta potatoes, except sweet potatoes occasionally, no rice. Stuff like that. If I could drop 70lb that would put me very close to where I want to be.
 
Feb 25, 2007
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SE Michigan
#12
BYS google "free the animal" it's a health blog. That guy is compiling info on adding "resistant starch" to your diet. The idea is with that starch in your diet it changes how your body processes foods like potatoes that usually get turned into glucose. It's interesting, some folks reporting success. I tried it, had mixed results.
 

woojos

Sergeant
May 3, 2013
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#13
Crossfit is great for more than a few reasons.
...and it is a poor choice for a few more than that.

The fact of the matter is that a one size fits all fitness class doesn't fit everyone. The cross fit argument is that you can 'scale' every movement to fit doesn't work in real life.

A 300lb guy doesn't need to be doing box jumps, double unders, and barbell movements with poor form under the coaching of a guy with suspect credentials. A 120lb women doesn't either.

OP there's more effective and less risky methods to get to get to where you want to go.

Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk
 

-R-

Tactical as F***
Mar 5, 2014
123
2
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CA
#14
I agree about the yogurt and the not pushing yourself to the point of injury, which I did this morning. I was stretching and popped something in my hip. It isn't real bad but I defenitley pulled or tore something a little. I'm just trying to cut out processed food and starches. No bread, pasta potatoes, except sweet potatoes occasionally, no rice. Stuff like that. If I could drop 70lb that would put me very close to where I want to be.
Diet is everything. Dont buy into kipping and doing olympic/power lifting for excessive reps under a time limit. That is where injuries come into play. Crossift is the new fad when cross training has been around for a long time. If I were you id focus on HIIT (high intensity interval training) for cardio. Some of the principals of crossfit are sound, but I wouldnt push anything that you feel your health is at risk.

If your goal is to lose 70lbs the cardio is going to be your best friend, HIIT being one of the best out there for burning fat.
 
Nov 8, 2010
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Midlothian, VA
#15
A 300lb guy doesn't need to be doing box jumps, double unders, and barbell movements with poor form under the coaching of a guy with suspect credentials. A 120lb women doesn't either.
A 300lb guy most likely wouldn't be doing box jumps, they would be doing step-ups. They wouldn't do say 30 double unders, they would do 90 singles instead. As for Oly lifts, in QUALITY CF gyms, everyone goes through a fundamentals course on proper movements using a PVC bar. While everyone's movements are monitored, special attention is certainly given to new athletes. A newbie grabbing a copy of Stronglifts or some other plan and going to a regular gym and trying this by themselves is far more likely to have bad form than someone in a properly run Crossfit gym.
 

JimD

Private
Jul 31, 2003
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GA
#16
I like crossfit football better as it has an Olympic lift component everyday and then a WOD. Also has sprinting and more max height jumping. Down side is I have to throw in some runs in as all the running is sprinting.
 

Sierra770

Sergeant of the Hide
Nov 2, 2013
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Atlanta, GA
#17
Lots of wisdom in this thread. Yes, diet is key. Crossfit/Gym Jones/Brassring Fitness/Military Athlete are great programs. HOWEVER.....if you are indeed carrying around an extra 70 to 80 lbs, you are inviting injury into your life trying to go headlong into these programs. Listen to your body and there is no shame in walking away from a particular exercise. The rucking and other cardio is a great idea. Be militant in getting your workouts/rucks/walks in each week and moderate what goes into your body and you will be a different man before you know it.
 
Sep 29, 2011
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pottsville, ky
#18
Yeah I do the box jumps just fine. I usually use the 20"box. I do suck at double unders. I'm fairly athletic for a big guy. I just need to trim off the extra weight. The ruck marching does indeed peel the weight off I have used it before when I was packing around a few extra pounds. I'm down about 8 lbs so far. Crossfit is by far the most practical workout I have ever done. I dont understand the deal with the kipping. I mean if I was still in the military and I needed to get myself up onto a platform or over some obstacle would it not be beneficial to know how to kip and do a muscle up to get yourself over. I guess most guys would just say well fuck I can't get myself over this obstacle with a strict pullup so I guess I'll just stay here and let the bad guys catch me. Nope I bet they would be kipping there ass off. Train like you fight
 

woojos

Sergeant
May 3, 2013
495
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#19
A 300lb guy most likely wouldn't be doing box jumps, they would be doing step-ups. They wouldn't do say 30 double unders, they would do 90 singles instead. As for Oly lifts, in QUALITY CF gyms, everyone goes through a fundamentals course on proper movements using a PVC bar. While everyone's movements are monitored, special attention is certainly given to new athletes. A newbie grabbing a copy of Stronglifts or some other plan and going to a regular gym and trying this by themselves is far more likely to have bad form than someone in a properly run Crossfit gym.
90 singles is just as bad. A fundamentals class where you "learn" highly technical lifts in one day under no load conditions does not imply a competence to do the lifts. Ask any competitive oly lifter and they will tell you they are still trying to learn correct technique. You should also ask yourself why you are doing oly lifts in the first place, especially if they are part of a conditioning WOD.

There's also a difference between using box jumps to train power and speed-strength and using them as a conditioning movement.

I'm not saying there aren't good Crossfit gyms, but they are the vast minority, and I'm urging the OP to apply a great deal of skepticism and discretion about his goals and the methods he is using to acheive them.

It's been said, walking/rucking is great way to lose fat and build a base level of aerobic conditioning. Stretch daily, lift weights and take the time to learn and ingrain correct form before loading them up. If you go the HIIT route, watch your movement selection and choose exercises based on a cost-benefit analysis and this is my main point. You can affect a training response, without putting the wear and tear on your body. The OP already popped something in his hip, and hasn't lost 70lbs yet. There is very little excuse to get hurt in training for baseline fitness.
 
Sep 29, 2011
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#20
The popping in my hip was totally my fault. I'll have to take the blame for that one. It was nothing that was prescribed in class it was some dumbassery on my part. I have a pretty good history on the weight lifting and my form is solid on everything except maybe the snatch. I'll have to admit I had never really seen a need to do that before crossfit but I'll have to say at the "box" Im going to they are very insistent on correct form and they insist that you stay light until they feel your form is acceptable.
 

Lazlo

Sergeant
Sep 22, 2008
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Upstate SC
#22
I've been doing CF since Nov. For reference, I'm 37, 190lbs, run a 7min mile, and bench ~250. Below are a few observations, good and bad:

- Anyone beginning CF that doesn't have experience with Oly lifting should take a course from an experienced trainer. The Lvl-1 certified CF trainers take a weekend course, and that's not enough. If you don't have access to a trainer, buy Mark Rippetoe's "Starting Strength" videos and books for proper form. Regardless, none of the people who are encouraging you at the end of the workout are going to pay your orthopedist's bills.

- In that vein, look at anyone who encourages you by saying "Good Form!", with skepticism for the first few months. A good coach needs to be constantly reinforcing the good and also giving corrections. I'm learning that proper form takes years to develop.

- Diet is more important to managing weight then exercise (in the short term), so do your research. I recommend reading Taubes' "Good Calories Bad Calories" to understand the physiological effects of diet, as opposed to following a particular regimen without understanding why. At an older age, you can do everything right except a few things regarding diet, and never see any real weight loss gains.

- Performing high-rep, complex Oly lifts can be very dangerous, so not getting into the group motivation mentality, and instead listening to your body can help in avoiding injury (see above regarding orthopedist's bills). I managed to walk around with an exertion migraine for about a week after doing 135lb deadlifts to failure. Not a good idea.

- CF box mentalities differ greatly based on ownership, so understand that some are more strength oriented than others. Provided you have a few in your area, sample a couple of boxes to find the right fit. Also, pairing up with someone with a similar build and goals can go along way towards getting your arse in the box on a more regular basis. If everyone there are strength/fitness freaks, you'll naturally feel alienated, regardless of their encouragement.

- I agree with others that some of the exercises, e.g., ring dips, T2B, kipping pull-ups, box jumps; should not be performed if you're significantly overweight. I'd recommend instead substituting an alternate exercise until you've hit your target weight. I've seen people rigging up multiple bands to assist with pull-ups, which completely outweighs the benefits of the exercise.

- Substitute other exercises if you don't see the benefit. For instance, I don't kip on pull-ups, and as a result will not develop proper T2B form either. I do strict pull-ups, and jump from the ground once I achieve failure. If you have a reasonable objection, tell the coach what you'll be doing and move on.
 
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Jan 15, 2009
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#23
If Crossfit gets you motivated and gets you to the gym, then great. I tried it, it's not for me. I don't like the false motivation, the kool-aid, frat-like feel of it all. Either you want to train or you don't. Either you're going to push yourself for that last rep, or you won't. And indeed, the Level 1 trainers don't have nearly enough training to tell you whether you've got good form or not. But as I said, if CF is what it takes to get you working out again, then just be smart, train smart, and stick with it. Once you're in shape and you've got the muscle memory to do the complex lifts, save that $150/month, get a membership at Gold's for $20/month, and buy more ammo!
 

SuckitTrebek

The rapist for $200
Nov 22, 2005
207
17
18
The Great State of Texas
#24
...and it is a poor choice for a few more than that.

The fact of the matter is that a one size fits all fitness class doesn't fit everyone. The cross fit argument is that you can 'scale' every movement to fit doesn't work in real life.

A 300lb guy doesn't need to be doing box jumps, double unders, and barbell movements with poor form under the coaching of a guy with suspect credentials. A 120lb women doesn't either.

OP there's more effective and less risky methods to get to get to where you want to go.

Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk

Really? what more effective and less risky method would better than crossfit, that of course gets results just the same? enlighten me.

You assume that someone with poor credentials is teaching. Which is pretty stupid actually to make such a broad statement.

And it's not a one size fits all. Each individual can change the amount of weight they handle, speed, and number of reps in each exercise. Of course
if a particular excercise isn't good for an individual then they don't have to do that one. What is so fucking backwards about that?

Sure I agree that crossfit isn't for everyone. I, for example am in excellent shape and don't go to crossfit.

But if I had to recommend one program for overall fitness and flexibility it's pretty damn hard to beat.
 
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woojos

Sergeant
May 3, 2013
495
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#25
I don't want to get in a big pissing contest over this, but here's my attempt at a respectful answer:

You say "crossfit" like it is some sort of system, when the daily wods on the crossfit.com can differ very differently from the daily wods in a shitty crossfit gym versus a good crossfit gym. Pretty soon any form of exercise is labelled crossfit and people are drinking the koolaid and defending it vehemently. So if you really want an answer to your question, you need to tell me what "crossfit" is, as every gym does it differently, yet it's all called crossfit. This is why shitty gyms and coaches exist, as they are technically doing the same thing as good gyms and coaches and people, especially novices, don't know the difference and don't seem to interested in learning.

This is what happens when you try to can something and sell it, whether its a physical training program or firearms training program. People drink the koolaid, become fanboys, and don't really think about or even try to understand the reasons why they are doing something. Generally these types of systems don't breed thinkers and adapters who do the bruce lee "adopt what is useful, discard what is useless" and instead just copy what somebody else thought was best, without being able to understand the reasons for why they are doing it.

I can write about 100 general fitness workouts, like daily wods, that would get better results than just starting with the daily wods on the crossfit site, and I do it all the time for people that ask my advice. Most people that have had any success in training themselves, the old way where they figured it out without the internet or someone else telling them what to do, can do this. I used to keep track of 3 or 4 good crossfit gyms that posted what I would call good daily wods for a general fitness/strength level, but I stopped caring and don't remember them. For every 1 of these gyms, there are many more that frankly suck.

The one thing I will mention is the scaling issue... i.e. an individual doesn't have the coordination or fitness to do 30 double unders so do 90 singles instead. This is a broad scaling criterion and if you apply it to everyone, things are going to get screwed up. The concept of scaling is good, however the devil is in the details and sooner or later someone will screw it up.

For an example, I knew a girl in the AF. She was a runner with no upper body strength to speak of at the time. The WOD involved 21 pullups but she couldn't not even with a band or kipping. The coach told her to do 100 negatives instead. Kinda like you can't do 1 double under so its a good idea to triple your volume on a simpler movement. If you versed in a bit of physical training, you will know that it is the eccentric or negative portion of the lift which makes you sore and does the most muscle damage. So this poor girl, did as she was told and did 100 negative pull ups. She got real deal rhabo, which can kill, which put her in the hospital for a few days and then she couldn't move her arms for a month. I'm not making this up.

This about sums up my thoughts: Crossfit is too general a label that refers to both good and bad training programs, there are very good crossfit gyms out there that do their job well and there are also bad ones. People, especially newbs, don't have the experience to tell them apart. Sometimes this gets them hurt.
 
Sep 29, 2013
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Northern Michigan
#26
Back Yard, hope you keep it up. Crossfit isn't for everyone but it has brought alot of people into lifting that previously where sitting on the sidelines. I have been doing crossfit on and off for years, right now I am pretty close ot 3,4,5 with a CJ about 240 currently. What I like is , I don't have to do the programing. Typically I do 2 WOD per day , I try to target my exursion level and just keep it steady. Scale is everything, lots of good comments about scale above. Remember your only trying to better your last WOD, no use trying to compete against someone else. One thing becomes really clear when watching others do CF, everybody is good at something
 

Doc68

Sergeant
Feb 17, 2014
605
1
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3rd rock from the sun
#27
Yeah I do the box jumps just fine. I usually use the 20"box. I do suck at double unders. I'm fairly athletic for a big guy. I just need to trim off the extra weight. The ruck marching does indeed peel the weight off I have used it before when I was packing around a few extra pounds. I'm down about 8 lbs so far. Crossfit is by far the most practical workout I have ever done. I dont understand the deal with the kipping. I mean if I was still in the military and I needed to get myself up onto a platform or over some obstacle would it not be beneficial to know how to kip and do a muscle up to get yourself over. I guess most guys would just say well fuck I can't get myself over this obstacle with a strict pullup so I guess I'll just stay here and let the bad guys catch me. Nope I bet they would be kipping there ass off. Train like you fight
Swimming is a great exercise to use to lose those first 20-40lbs so you wont have as many injuries. It works all of your muscle groups and cardio at the same time. It really does work well. Give it a try.
 

JBNj

Sergeant
Aug 1, 2013
257
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Central Jersey
#30
Did you know crossfit doesn't exist. Brainwashed people who drank the koolaid believe in crossfit. People who have spent their time training know what im taking about. When you take an explosive lift like the snatch or clean and jerk and use it as a cardio element your an idiot. Strength and conditioning coaches don't follow crossfit. they seem to be doing pretty good in producing the best athletes breaking world records. Cross training has been around forever. But crossfit reinvented the wheel? If you can do strict pull-ups than kipping is quite easy. But kipping can/will lead to torn shoulders.

Personally i dont care what programming you choose for yourself. If you like it and its producing results fine. Just realized crossfit doesn't exist. The exercises you do already existed. Crossfit is a brand with marketing to overcharge to exercise. Nothing has changed in fitness for years. You want to get strong? Lift weights and add resistance. Want to have better cardio? Focus on anaerobic and aerobic exercises. Want to be more explosive? Add explosive lifts and then sport specific exercises that are tailored to what you compete or do.

Results crossfit will do for you will be the same as p90x or insanity. It will take a out of shape person and get them in shape and lose some lbs. programs that are a one size fits all is ok for the general pop. But if you want to make the best that you can be then speacilized training is where it's at.

Crossfit trainers aren't specialized for advice on oly lifts. It really takes a lot to know how to identify bad form and explain how to fix it (dropping weight isn't the quick fix) the advice of oly coach would be far better. As a matter of fact the money you spend in crossfit would be better served if you seeked out a strength and conditions coach even if you only see him a few times a month.

I'm not a believer of crossfit. Nope sorry. Strong,fast,explosive men have been around long before crossfit. Crossfit's theme of producing the fittest men is a joke amongst real world athletes. But who am i to judge... Glassman is making a pretty penny for being a overweight out of shape fraud. You have to ask yourself would you take fitness training advice from a fat guy. Nevermind smart trainers switching over to the crossfit image, the $$$ in the fitness industry is lacking but the new koolaid is putting extra bucks in their pocket.
 
Likes: rookie7
Sep 29, 2011
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pottsville, ky
#31
I wonder if all these haters are people who thought they were really in shape then went to a crossfit class and got thier ass handed to them. I agree it is not the be all end all to fitness and it isnt the answer for everyone. There are some downsides but for the most part it is a good program I think. As far as the extra motivation I get from the group kind of atmosphere I like it and after you attend a box for a while and get to know all the people there you would see there is nothing fake at all about the motivation. There seems to be far less asshats with the kind of attitude like the post right above this one displays
 

BoilerUP

Gunny Sergeant
Jan 16, 2011
2,731
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Clark Co., IN
#32
Guy I know that jumped into CF and paleo with both feet gave me all kinds of hell about distance running, wearing *gasp* running shoes instead of the current minimalist/barefoot fad, eating pasta and bread, etc etc etc.

He claimed CF was all about practical movements...like carrying around heavy things and carrying a bucket of water up multiple flights of stairs. Because that's practical.

The benefit of Crossfit is self-evident to anybody that's done physical labor for employment...but the smug cultish attitude of many CFers is unbelievably off-putting. As mentioned above, plyometrics really aren't anything new and essentially that's what CF does.

Also, $120+/mo for membership to a "box" is a freaking ripoff.
 
Sep 29, 2011
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pottsville, ky
#33
It must vary quite a bit from place to place on the price. I was under the same assumption on yhe the cost but I get the unlimited package which is $95 and with a military discount I pay abouy $75. The three times a week package is about $60 and around $45 with the mil/le discount. The pricing is a bit higher than some standard gyms bit the fact that it is small group with a coach/trainer on hand makes it worth $75 a month to me. I do agree some of the trainers are lacking in knowledge but some are really good. The bottom line is it is helping to accomplish the goals that I have set and that is what matters to me
 

JBNj

Sergeant
Aug 1, 2013
257
2
0
Central Jersey
#34
If your seeing results and enjoying yourself on your journey than stick with it. I didn't mean to come off as trying to bash you for doing crossfit. I'm sure their is a great group of people getting together with similar goals and motivating each other can feel rewarding.

It's just my view on crossfit branding,questionable exercise selection and usage, among other things.

Good luck with your goals and keep us updated.
 

haunas

Full Member
Oct 11, 2013
38
0
6
Hawaii
#36
Backyard I hope you attain your goals doing whatever physical endeavor you do. With that said I used to be a CF coach (since 2009) and been avid into CF (since 2007) at a local gym and like what one poster wrote going to one seminar doesn't make you a coach knowledgeable in body movement, body awareness, oly lifting, etc. Seek out gyms where to be a coach there is an apprentice/intern program and where the head coaches have more than just CF certs. As well as ask questions about whatever, diet, rowing, oly lifting, they should be able to know the answer/reason or find out relatively fast. The "boxes" are franchises with little or no oversight from the mothership so buyer beware, esp with respect to programming workouts. As another poster posted there are alot of shoulder injuries due to poor programming as well as more upper body working out compared to our legs being our prime movers...unless you walk on your hands everywhere. Definitely do lots of stretching and try to seek as much information on Kelly Starrett, mobility, etc. Also, a good coach should push you to near the point of failure on a lift then stop you bring you back to correct form then go again.

I also workout wherever and whenever so if no CF gym then base gym is fine doing lifts, crosstraining which is the same thing in my opinion.

To loose weight I suggest you look at zone paleo. I have done paleo before and done well on it and wanted to try zone with paleo since I was a coach at the time and worked even better and since being out of the game. My wife and I started doing it together and I have been having great weight loss so far. Hit me up if you have questions.
 
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SuckitTrebek

The rapist for $200
Nov 22, 2005
207
17
18
The Great State of Texas
#37
Fuck the paleo diet. Matter of fact fuck every other diet out there too.

What ever happened to just eating a well balanced diet, staying away from processed foods and added sugar? That's all the fuck anyone needs.

Candid shot from a buddies gopro camera coming off of an obstacle during the Central Texas Tough Mudder May, 3 2014.

Yep, no fad bullshit diets here (or crossfit for that matter). I seem to be doing alright.

 
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pottsville, ky
#38
Welll some of us arent that geneticaly lucky. I mean I'm sure you have to work to stay in shape but I have a good friend like that. We were in the army together for about 5 years. He could eat fucking microwave pizzas between meals for a snack and never had to go to the gym and the son of a bitch looked like he could be on the cover of mens fitness. I had to continually starve myself and do extra pt on my own to be able to beat the tape test. Some people are just born with a body composition that lends itself to being easier to maintain
 

SuckitTrebek

The rapist for $200
Nov 22, 2005
207
17
18
The Great State of Texas
#39
There's always someone that says "genetically lucky". Or my personal favorite is that I have a "high metabolism" hahahaha

No..............I eat right and work out. Simple as that. I suggest more discipline in the diet and gym. Anyone can get to where I am.

Your first problem is that you starved yourself. Which if you know first thing about eating right has a horrible effect on the body.

WELL BALANCED DIET is key.
 
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Sep 29, 2011
239
1
18
39
pottsville, ky
#40
I'll agree with that. Starving yourself does not work however that seemed to be the popular answer in the army at the time. Hell I don't even need to get to where you're at. I just don't want to be fucking fat anymore. This shit sucks and it is much easier to get there than one would think
 

SuckitTrebek

The rapist for $200
Nov 22, 2005
207
17
18
The Great State of Texas
#41
I don't think it's easy bro. The formula to get there is easy. The discipline to do it is hard.

myfitnesspal.com

Subscribe to a calorie counting website. weigh your portions. Nothing processed and no sugar added at all. That means no candy, soda, sugar in your coffee, nothing from the frozen food section except frozen fruit, no fast food or eating out of any sort. With the exception of myfitfoods. NO ALCOHOL.

If your doing all that. You will lose weight, it's guaranteed. Exercise just speeds it up!

Lots of lean meats, chicken breast, turkey breast, fruit and vegetables every day. I could stand to gain weight so I don't count calories as much. You would need to weigh your portions and count calories. So get a digital scale.

At least 90 ounces of water daily.

And there are no "cheat days" That is for the mentally weak. Your system operates 24/7.

Fuck paleo. Greek yogurt is awesome for you.
 
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haunas

Full Member
Oct 11, 2013
38
0
6
Hawaii
#42
Sure as shit sounds like zone and paleo/Robb Wolf/Mark's Daily Apple. Though I do agree I don't follow it super strict and more a Robb Wolff variation since sweet potatoes, yogurt and other non-Paleo items are good for you. Personally I don't care the name as long as it gets the results, I and others would like. Each there own results are more important then trying to impress anyone with the hooplah bullshit and great pic of you too....sexy. Oh and if you think genetics/science/biology has nothing to do with it better go back to HS biology and learn about homozygous and heterozygous dominant and recessive genes. FYI, sickle cell anemia is a GENETIC disorder passed genetically but for the purposes of continuing on the gene- (theres that word again) -pool in malaria stricken regions.
 
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bhoges

Sergeant
Nov 11, 2003
768
25
28
Plainview,NY
#43
At 42 Ive been doing crossfit for 2 years now and Im in the best shape ever. Ive always trained but got so bored of regular lifting. I really enjoy the olympic lifts and found I don't need to waste time of lots of exercises I used to do. Its not for everyone and there are a lot of cross fit haters of there. Use good form and you won't get hurt. Im sore after every wod. The hardest part is trying to keep up with the 20yr olds. Pretty cool when I beat their times and the girls are hot!
 

baue

Full Member
Jun 22, 2014
37
0
6
Colorado Springs
#48
Most of the operator types on AD seem to do crossfit (the ones I know at least), and from that I draw the conclusion that it is an effective workout. That being said, you need to be athletic and not a moron (don't drop the weights on yourself) to avoid getting hurt. People who say you can get injured more easily than other workouts are full of shit, you can get injured all the same doing oly lifting if you try to push too far. It really comes down to what you like best/what is best for you. I used to strictly do running/pushups/abs (to look good) and I know that crossfit pushes me to the next level. Do what's best for you and make the decision for yourself, dont listen to all the idiots (including me) on here. I recommend having a solid base athetically before starting crossfit, but I don't believe it to be necessary. All that being said, getting into shape is 80% diet anyway so that may be another place to look.

EDIT: Forgot to add that I also still supplement crossfit 5 days a week with running at least 4 days a week and I typically just try to stay low-carb and generally eat healthy but have no real "diet" per se.
 
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#49
I also still supplement crossfit 5 days a week with running at least 4 days a week and I typically just try to stay low-carb and generally eat healthy but have no real "diet" per se.
+1

I just recently started supplementing my daily Crossfit sessions with a run 2-3 times a week and it's made a huge difference. Crossfit is all about intensity and you'll see improvements in strength and endurance over time, but for me personally I found that over the first year my cardio was the number one thing holding me back. Now that I've added in a variety of runs that last anywhere from 30-60 minutes, up and down hills, cross country or just on flat roads, I find that I'm able to get through WODs faster. So much so that I used to barely be able to get through Murph in an hour and now I'm in the 45 minute zone.
 
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