.223 M40 tribute

pmclaine

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.308 receiver I picked up here. Really clean have the .308 bolt stashed as a spare.

Picked up the old school .223 bolt here.

Barrel is a Bartlein. Think I went 1:7.7 left the chamber up to the builder - Raven Rifles.

Stock is an @deptaylor production. Good guy hasn't been around much.

@deptaylor also provided the buttplate and old school sling swivels

BDL metal is off a 1968 rifle I had made into my M40A1ish.

Scope base is one @USMCSGT0331 provided to me.

Scope will be a green Leupold M40 3-9X replica with mil dot reticle.

Trigger is an old Remington tombstone variety.
 

pmclaine

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That is going to be sooooo much fun. Do you have a specific bullet in mind?

77 SMKs or 77 Nos CC.

Was just getting some gear ready to shoot the 5x5 @garandman is warbling on about using my AR.

Looked at what my current load is

22.9 of 8208XBR with WSRP, WCC 1X brass and Nosler CC 77 grainers.

I think 2.26 was the OAL

Give those a try to start.
 
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Greg Langelius *

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Use Lin-Speed. It is an extra-thick form of BLO. It does the job in less time. A little heat can ease the drying/curing time; the extra thickness slows drying. Read the reviews on the Amazon page for extra tips/tricks, etc.

One drop, hand rubbed to generate friction heat and allow it to spread more, then some warmth (not necessarily heat) during the drying curing.

Another trick, when starting out, wet sand the stock with 120 grit and Lin-Speed. the dust generated becomes a grain filler that does not in any way impede the view of the wood grain. The process forms something that looks a bit like mud. Leave it standing on the surface and allow it to dry/cure thoroughly. Then cut it down with more 120 grit and Lin-Speed. The grain will fill ever so much faster.

This is what I used in The Corps back in 1966 on my M-14 stock.

During final inspection before Embarkation for 'Nam; Gen. 'Brute' Krulak grabbed my rifle, commented very favorably on it, asked me what I used (I lied, and said, "Raw linseed oil, Sir!"; the only thing I could say without encountering a reprimand, I'd been a baaad boy.), and the Company Commander promoted me on the spot after the formation to Lance Corporal. So don't rat me out...

After the formation, I was directed to sand it all down to a dull finish, to prevent reflection and becoming a more tempting target.

So I have good reason to recommend it, and it's even period-correct for that M-40 Clone.

LOL!

Greg
 
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pmclaine

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Use Lin-Speed. It is an extra-thick form of BLO. It does the job in less time. A little heat can ease the drying/curing time; the extra thickness slows drying. Read the reviews on the Amazon page for extra tips/tricks, etc.

One drop, hand rubbed to generate friction heat and allow it to spread more, then some warmth (not necessarily heat) during the drying curing.

Another trick, when starting out, wet sand the stock with 120 grit and Lin-Speed. the dust generated becomes a grain filler that does not in any way impede the view of the wood grain. The process forms something that looks a bit like mud. Leave it standing on the surface and allow it to dry/cure thoroughly. Then cut it down with more 120 grit and Lin-Speed. The grain will fill ever so much faster.

This is what I used in The Corps back in 1966 on my M-14 stock.

During final inspection before Embarkation for 'Nam; Gen. 'Brute' Krulak grabbed my rifle, commented very favorably on it, asked me what I used (I lied, and said, "Raw linseed oil, Sir!"; the only thing I could say without encountering a reprimand, I'd been a baaad boy.), and the Company Commander promoted me on the spot after the formation to Lance Corporal. So don't rat me out...

After the formation, I was directed to sand it all down to a dull finish, to prevent reflection and becoming a more tempting target.

So I have good reason to recommend it, and it's even period-correct for that M-40 Clone.

LOL!

Greg

Your method is solid but Im going with time and friction.

Got 6 coats on as of this AM.

The oil Im using is burrowing deep into the wood, the stock is like a sponge drinking it up.

Im getting three coats a day right now because the wood is drying it right up.

Ill be hitting it to the point the oil starts to stay on the surface than I cut the amount applied a little bit and keep trying to light that thing on fire through hand friction.

Nothing finer than an oil finished stock, looks great, easy to maintain.
 

sirmixalot

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wood stocks are art work! never get bored of looking at them
 

Defender3

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I'm going to try that Williamsburg on my A4 stock. It's been neglected and I suspect it will absorb that oil like a black hole.
 
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kraigWY

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Back in the 70s the USAMU Sniper School was mainly set up to produce sniper instructors. To get accepted I had to provide a letter saying I would come back to my unit and start a sniper program. I did from the AK NG, but also attached a letter from my Department, (Anchorage Police Dept) indicating the same thing.

The AMU put out a guide for LE Counter Snipers. In the Guide they had a list of recommended rifles. Top of the List was the Remington 700 BDL Varment, in 223, with a Fixed 6-8 power, wide field. Sighted in for 250 meters, which gave you the ability to make head shots up to 300 Meters. Of course back then the rifle was 1:12 which worked great for the M193.

I got home and set the rifle up as suggested, carried it the rest of my LE Career. It was perfect for urban LE. Never saw a need for the 308 in civilian Police work.

Still have that rifle.


 

sirmixalot

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the wood stock rifles never get old. The Winchester M70 from the Vietnam era is another I think looks good in wood
 

kraigWY

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Oh, you're talking about real rifle. The Model 70s are my all time favorite rifles.

1949 Made Model 70 in 30-06, one of my most accurate rifles even at 70 year old.



AMU Model 70 Tgt Rifle, 308, I got from the CMP Auction site. Another Shooter.

 

pmclaine

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All this hand rubbing makes me long to shoot my new shooter.

Next best thing bring out the big brother....

MaWhinney over run.....

m401.jpg

m402.jpg

Last 15 rounds of 42.1 I4064, 1XFGMM, 168 SMK, WLRP

m403.jpg

Needs a zero adjustment but with new ammo coming on line not now.
 

pmclaine

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That stock looks like it has some really nice figure in it. Cant wait to see it finished.

Its looking kind of dark right now.

Kind of looks like one of those old school burl wood pipe bowls but you have to get up to it to see it.

It will be another week or so.

The park job on the metal is dynamite.

If I could only unlock the secret to making it "green" like old WWII milsurps.

I think the only answer is cosmoline, blood, sweat, tears, coal tar based cleaning products and time to get that patina.
 

sirmixalot

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Those are beauties. Wood stock rifles are pure art. The one rifle I like in a Fiberglass McMillan is a heavy barrel 40x in 22lr. I like them made into Marine Sniper configurations. This M70s about are awesome! I agree that the M70 with steel butt plate makes a mans gun
 

pmclaine

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Got it all together today.

Anticipating shooting it Saturday which almost guarantees I get an over time or something and cant shoot it.
 
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cornhusker86

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I understand that what I'm about to say runs counter to your stated goals for this build, BUT that grain is just begging for some glossy goodness! ;)
 

pmclaine

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I have a glossy one in .308 win. The finish on this one is Pure Tung Oil....

7097904

The new one is a cold pressed raw linseed oil. Its a more GI finish. Im hoping it will turn "red" with some sun and useage.

EDIT - Sorry forgot I included pics of the .308 already in this thread but who doesnt like gratutitous M40 pictures?
 
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pmclaine

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Im hoping it turns the color/sheen of my Model 70/Unertl pictured above.

Only reason I bought that rifle and spent the money rebuilding it was I fell in love with the color of the stock at Cabelas
 
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pmclaine

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I'll have to get on the hunt for some 77 SMKs.

I have a shit ton of Noslers in 55 and 77 grain flavor that were all intended for the carbine and they work "good enough".

When it comes to sorting by weight I prefer to do it post loading.
 
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pmclaine

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Is your rifle bedded? I was thinking those groups might shrink up if the rifle was bedded, and or pillered.
Just a thought.
It's fully bedded.

Those groups will shrink up just fine if I shoot a load tailored for it not my 16 inch carbine which is what that ammo was made for.

I think it's a little anemic at 22.9 of 8208XBR, and let's not forget the barrel has all of 50 rounds or so through it. It will be a different gun at 200 rounds.
 
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sandwarrior

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It's fully bedded.

Those groups will shrink up just fine if I shoot a load tailored for it not my 16 inch carbine which is what that ammo was made for.

I think it's a little anemic at 22.9 of 8208XBR, and let's not forget the barrel has all of 50 rounds or so through it. It will be a different gun at 200 rounds.
What bullet weight?
 

pmclaine

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Most times I see people list there 8208XBR loads they are running 23.3 +/-.

Its a great powder for running in a Dillon.

Thinking of switching my .308 over to 8208 from 4064 next go round.

Tired of tiny logs of 4064 falling over my loading bench.

The tiny short cuts of 8208XBR dont get hung up in the drop.
 

sandwarrior

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Unless you are running a .223 Wylde, 5.56 Nato chamber or have significant erosion, 23.2 gr. is the max for a 77 gr. bullet in a straight up .223 Rem.

I'm not saying more powder can't be used, but you definitely have to work up to it in each individual rifle.

PMC,

It's only been in the last couple years that I've seen 4064 with Enduron technology. Which is pretty much how Hodgdon (who now owns IMR) makes all the "Extreme" powders. They have better applications of burn retardant, that allows you to run at max with less chance of overpressuring due to heat, i.e. outside air and long strings of fire. It's not intended to run over their numbers. But, there isn't really good guidelines as to where/when to stop with a good thing. Knowing the "why" in each case of each rifle would help. If you can get the "new" 4064, you'll find it meters as well as anything. The old stuff as you said, is like mini-logs.
 

Flint62a1

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When you finished your stock, was it strictly hand rubbed? I have in the past used 600 grit sand paper and the oil to help fill the pores. I just finished the third hand rubbed coat, and I like the way it looks, open pores and all. It looks better with every coat!
Thanks,
Kevin
 

pmclaine

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I just hand finished.

Probably could have made it look "prettier" adding some stock finishers pumice or some very high grit sand paper but I was going for GI finish on the .223.

It will finish itself with use and additional oil.

My .308 I used tung oil and got a real deep shine finish.
 
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