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Thread: Bullet Price History

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    Bullet Price History

    Just want to gauge how price of bullets have risen over the past few years. How much was 1000 Sierra MatchKing 175 gr in 308 Winchester 5 and 10 years ago?
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    Re: Bullet Price History

    don't know about those but I use to buy the rainier ballistics 45 acp 230 for $65/1000 now they are $115/1000, that is my cost as a dealer.

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    Re: Bullet Price History

    Originally Posted By: attherange
    don't know about those but I use to buy the rainier ballistics 45 acp 230 for $65/1000 now they are $115/1000, that is my cost as a dealer.


    Is $65/1000 5 years ago price?
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Benjamin Franklin


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    Re: Bullet Price History

    I know it's a bit further back than you wanted, but this is from a 1993-4 Weidners catalog


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    Re: Bullet Price History

    So today (1000) 175 SMK's costs roughly $290. However, $167 in 1993 is roughly equivalent to $256 in 2011 if you account for inflation.

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    Re: Bullet Price History

    That comes up to about 3% per year price increase for this bullet. Reasonable comparing to other goods I guess.
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Benjamin Franklin


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    Re: Bullet Price History

    Dollar numbers really don't count, what matters is how long we have to work to buy what we want. Component prices have kept pace with inflation over the last 50 years. Reloading tools are actually less 'costly' now than in the 60's.

    Brief lesson in economics and our currency:

    Inflation was invented by really big industralists and bankers in the teens and early 1920's. They came up with the idea of a Federal Reserve system, which is not federal at all, where they would control the power to 'invent' money; real money is not printed, as such, it's just a changed number on banking ledgers,cash is simply away for us to deal with small items at the retail level. The idea was sold to congress as a way to placate the working classes when they saw steady increases in their pay as 'getting ahead', the cost/pay inflation target rate was 3% per year.

    The whole scam was intended to keep people away from the lure of rapidly growing world communism while continueing to transfer the creation of wealth from workers to the ultra-rich; govenment bought into their scheme against us and politicians remain in the pocket of big banks. For over a hundered years the average worker's salary had been about $1 a day and it was enough. Without recognising their cost of living was almost exactly keeping pace with the ever larger numbers on their pay checks, and people felt things were going along fine. Labor unions distort things for small segments of society but at the expense of others, it all works out in the averages. A average day's pay now obtains somewhat more of some things but that's because of advances in methods that increase production without so much labor cost. We look back at pay 50 years ago and marvel at 'how well we're doing', especially since the cost of living has gone up so much!
    ** Common sense is an uncommon quality. **